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Round tip

Munson

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I thought I grabbed a tri tip but it’s actually a 2.5# round tip.

Suggestions on how to smoke it?
Temp/time?
Still reverse sear when done?

Thanks
Munson
 

indaswamp

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Yep..sous vide 125-130*F. I like to go 16-20 hours. And I like to smoke mine to 125^F INT and then sous vide.
If you do not pre smoke it, when cooking sous vide at that temp. range for a long time (+8hrs.) then you need to blanche the bag after you seal the roast in 180*F water for 10 minutes to kill any bacteria that you may transfer into the bag, otherwise, you will be incubating bacteria in the danger zone.
 

SmokinAl

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I never SV below 130 degrees, The lowest I go is 132, just to be on the safe side. If you check the pasteurization charts they don’t go below 130.
Here is a table that daveomak daveomak posted a while back.
Go to post #6.
Al
 
Last edited:

chopsaw

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I'm with Al on the SV temp . 132 is the lowest I go .
 

Bearcarver

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^^^^I'm with Al & Chop:^^^^
When I first started using my SV, I read at a lot of different places not to SV any Meat below 130°, so I never go below 131°--132°.
A few degrees below 132° isn't going to make anything Great happen anyway, so I figure why take the chance.

Bear
 

indaswamp

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If the sealed bag is not blanched prior to being placed into the sous vide water bath, then you guys are correct. But if the bag is blanched in 180*F water for 10 minutes prior to being placed into the sous vide water bath, then you can cook at 125*F for 8+ hours and it will be safe because the blanching has reduced to pathogens to log-5. The surface of the meat, and the entire inside surface of the bag will have been heated above 165*F.
 

Bearcarver

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Afraid Not:

From a safety standpoint, food cooking at temperatures below 130°F (54.4°C) isn't cooking at all, it's just being warmed. The bacteria we are trying to remove from cooking thrive from around 40°F (4.4°C) to 126°F (52.2°C), and they stop growing but don't start dying quickly until around 130°F (54.4°C). That range is known as the "danger zone" (cue Top Gun music) and it's often referred to in food safety circles.

Note that sometimes the danger zone is even considered to be up to 140°F (60°C) but that is based on building in a margin of error for restaurants, not the actual growth and death of the pathogens.

Cooking a piece of meat below 130°F (54.4°C) is the equivalent to letting it sit on your counter. It's fine for a few hours but it's not something you'll want to do all day. A generally accepted safe overall time in the danger zone, from leaving the fridge through cooking and eating is generally considered 3 to 4 hours.

Any piece of food that needs cooked longer than a few hours should be cooked at a minimum temperature of 130°F (54.4°C). If there is only one thing to remember about cooking in general, and sous vide cooking specifically, it's to not have your food between 40°F (4.4°C) and 130°F (54.4°C) for more than a few hours.

Source & The Rest:


Bear
 

Bearcarver

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If the sealed bag is not blanched prior to being placed into the sous vide water bath, then you guys are correct. But if the bag is blanched in 180*F water for 10 minutes prior to being placed into the sous vide water bath, then you can cook at 125*F for 8+ hours and it will be safe because the blanching has reduced to pathogens to log-5. The surface of the meat, and the entire inside surface of the bag will have been heated above 165*F.

And your "Source" is??? Link?

Thanks,
Bear
 

Bearcarver

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chopsaw

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you can cook at 125*F for 8+ hours and it will be safe
I read thru that source , and didn't see the above comment mentioned . Maybe I missed it , but the lowest temp I saw was 131 degrees .
 

indaswamp

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From Douglas Baldwin:
While there are many ways to kill food pathogens, cooking is the easiest. Every food pathogen has a temperature that it can’t grow above and a temperature it can’t grow below. They start to die above the temperature that they stop growing at and the higher above this temperature you go, the faster they die. Most food pathogens grow fastest a few degrees below the temperature that they start to die. Most food pathogens stop growing by 122°F (50°C), but the common food pathogen Clostridium perfringens can grow at up to 126.1°F (52.3°C). So in sous vide cooking, you usually cook at 130°F (54.4°C) or higher. (You could cook your food at slightly lower temperatures, but it would take you a lot longer to kill the food pathogens.)
https://www.douglasbaldwin.com/sous-vide.html

I will concede that 125*F is probably not safe for long cooks in sous vide- especially if the meat is raw.... Should be higher than 126.1*F.
I actually did a sous vide smoked beef roast for t-day. 128*F for 28 hours. The smoke chamber ran 225-260*F but stayed around 230*F mostly. This killed off any pathogens on the surface of the meat. I went stratight from the smokehouse into a vac bag then sealed. Both the surface salt and the smoke helped keep the bacteria at bay I'm sure....

anyways, the roast was excellent. tender like a tenderloin, cut it with a spoon....
 

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