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Quick Brining Question

louballs

Smoke Blower
112
12
Joined Jan 8, 2013
Hey Everyone,

I am just about out of my bacon from last year, so time to start a new batch. I wanted to use pops brine this time instead of a dry cure. I understand the measurements per gallon, but does that have any impact on weight. What I mean is that I plan on brining in a food grade 5 gallon bucket. My belly will be about 12 pounds. Do i use just enough liquid to cover the meat?

Thanks in advance!

Lou
 

mdboatbum

Master of the Pit
OTBS Member
4,068
349
Joined Apr 22, 2011
Originally Posted by louballs  

Do i use just enough liquid to cover the meat?

Thanks in advance!

Lou
Yes. As long as the meat is submerged and the brine is the proper strength, it doesn't matter if the meat is just barely submerged or if it's in a swimming pool full of brine, the effect will be the same.
 

louballs

Smoke Blower
112
12
Joined Jan 8, 2013
Thanks, so just to clarify. As long as the meat is submerged it doesn't matter how much liquid is in there? So 1 gallon of pops brine could theoretically cure 1-5 pounds of meat as long as the meat is covered? The reason I am double checking is because the pink salt to pound ratio is very specific when using a dry rub. Not so with a brine?
 

dirtsailor2003

Epic Pitmaster
OTBS Member
21,620
3,319
Joined Oct 4, 2012
 
Thanks, so just to clarify. As long as the meat is submerged it doesn't matter how much liquid is in there? So 1 gallon of pops brine could theoretically cure 1-5 pounds of meat as long as the meat is covered? The reason I am double checking is because the pink salt to pound ratio is very specific when using a dry rub. Not so with a brine?
Yes you can pack 1-5 pounds in there. as long as it is covered by the liquid. This type of curing is different than dry curing. If the meat is crammed in there move it around daily to expose the meat surfaces to the liquid ( I try and keep mine loosely separated and use multiple containers or more brine). On cuts of meat over 3" you nee to inject. Follow the times laid out by Pops. Also only like kinds of meat in the brine, pork with pork, chicken with chicken, beef with beef.

"Curing times vary with meat, but generally overnight to 2-3 days for chickens and turkeys, 8-10 days buckboard bacon, 10-14 days belly bacon, pork shoulder, whole butts, 3-4 weeks whole hams, 10-20 days corned beef (fresh beef roasts, briskets, rolled rib roasts, etc.)   If whole muscle is more than 2" thick, then inject so it can cure i/o as well as o/i, and/or in and around bone structures, etc.

You can add any other flavorings you'd like, this is just the basic curing brine. 1 heaping tablespoon of cure is about 1 ounce.  The maximum concentration allowed safely is 3.84 ounces per 1 gallon of brine (24 lbs.per 100 gallons: 16 oz. x 24 = 384 ounces, 1/100th is 3.84 ounces).  You can experiment with different concentrations as long as you keep it between those parameters"
 

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