New Member, We Make Smoking Woods!

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I don't know - it's kind of hard to describe. Goes nice with cheese though. Chips or chunks? Neither! I use the broken branches. I age them six months to a year. Branches about the diameter of your thumb. Break 'em up. It's cold smoke so you don't need much.
Awesome that works. Sounds like I need to track down some lilac!
 
Welcome from VT. glad you joined up.



I'm a little fuzzy on what this sentence actually means. Can you describe makes?

Chris
Haha totally, probably should've phrased that a bit differently. What we do is source all kinds of green woods, then we kiln-dry them, process them into chips/chunks/logs/regular firewood/mini splits, and package them.

Our specialty is 6" wood for mini pizza ovens, but we have access to sourcing around the country (and outside the US) with orchards, farms, loggers, and clearing operations so we can get wood that's otherwise very difficult to get your hands on. For example, like sawhorseray sawhorseray mentioned, there's very little hardwood in AZ. We help to eliminate that regionality so people in, let's just say AZ, can try out woods that don't grow in or around AZ or anywhere in the Southwest.

It's all done through FSC certified operations, so we're not actively felling any trees specifically for this purpose. And the kiln-drying makes it so there's no worry about spreading invasive insects across state borders (like in IL, you aren't supposed to ship wood across state Iines unless it's been heat-treated).

I've seen lots of comments that people can't tell the difference between smokes from different woods - and that's true without a doubt for lots of US-based hardwood species. But, there are woods that have extremely noticeable flavors that you'd have no trouble picking out of a lineup. Problem is, they're very hard to acquire. Like fig wood for example is really rare and a big supply is hard to come by. But, it's one of the best woods out there for smoking lobster. Pimento wood is another example - very unique, recognizable flavor used with Jamaican Jerk cooking. There are a TON more just like this, but they're not well known because they're either 1. in low supply, or 2. Grow outside of the US.

My goal is to use our sourcing to make those woods accessible, despite it being somewhat of a niche. Partially selfishly so I can make some unique recipes. But also because it's really awesome seeing what kind of creative recipes people can come up with from woods that have almost never been used or written about.
 
S Smurfsky Thank you for the response. I figured that you were sourcing and distributing various woods, but I just wanted to make sure. Who knows with the advancements in science these days. Maybe someone out there is actually making or developing wood for smoking.

Chris
 
S Smurfsky Thank you for the response. I figured that you were sourcing and distributing various woods, but I just wanted to make sure. Who knows with the advancements in science these days. Maybe someone out there is actually making or developing wood for smoking.

Chris
There are some companies popping up that are making tiny chunks soaked at their facilities in different alcohols (like whiskey, wine, etc). So I guess they “make” them!
I haven’t tried them in a smoker, but I have a container of them and they smell super nice.
 
S Smurfsky , good writeup. And thanks for explaining what Chris gmc2003 gmc2003 was wondering.
When you make/process the wood pieces, do you add anything to enhance the colour, scent etc.
Or is it all natural and no additives. Just chopped , cut and bagged

Thanks

David
Great question. We don’t put in any additives at all.

We do kiln-dry the wood, which eliminates any pests/mold/insects, and lowers the moisture content.

Other than that, it’s the cutting and packaging.
 
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How much do you want? I can ship it to you by the train car load :emoji_laughing: The stuff is everywhere around this area.

Robert

Thanks Robert,
Just enough to do some drums, couple full birds. maybe a few meatloaves, back bacon. and so on and so on.
lol
I will trade you some fallen birch and maple I have all over the yard in piles from the last few storms

David
 
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Hello from Washington State.
There is a great bbq joint I frequent in Mexico, that uses mango wood for smoking.
Any of that on hand?
 
Hello from Washington State.
There is a great bbq joint I frequent in Mexico, that uses mango wood for smoking.
Any of that on hand?
That’s interesting you say that- because we’ve heard really mixed things on that. Some people say it’s great, others say it’s completely unsuitable for smoking. We’d love to try it — what meats does the bbq place cook with it? Everything typical or anything particularly unique?
 
That’s interesting you say that- because we’ve heard really mixed things on that. Some people say it’s great, others say it’s completely unsuitable for smoking. We’d love to try it — what meats does the bbq place cook with it? Everything typical or anything particularly unique?
Typically pork ribs and pulled pork. I think they use it on chicken, too.
 
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