Low sodium bacon

  • Some of the links on this forum allow SMF, at no cost to you, to earn a small commission when you click through and make a purchase. Let me know if you have any questions about this.
SMF is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.
I'm very new to all of this and have been extremely pleased with the outcome of my bacon making experiences thus far using the .25%, 1.5%, .75% recipe. If I wanted to lower the salt to 1.25%, do I need additional curing time beyond the 10-14 days?
Absolutely YES. Go 3 weeks minimum.
I was planning on 3-4 weeks last fall with my 1% batch, but with complications it went almost 7 weeks.
No sign of bad meat and I haven't poisoned the couple dozen people that have sampled it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SmokinEdge
I'm very new to all of this and have been extremely pleased with the outcome of my bacon making experiences thus far using the .25%, 1.5%, .75% recipe. If I wanted to lower the salt to 1.25%, do I need additional curing time beyond the 10-14 days?
Remember Charles that you are .25% and 1.5% all in salt, that’s 1.75% sodium. So if you dip to 1.25% salt and .25% cure, that’s all in 1.5% sodium, and your 14 day cure time is still fine.

However if you cut salt to 1.0% and go .25% cure you are then all in at 1.25% sodium and yes add 7 days at that point.

Absolutely YES. Go 3 weeks minimum.
I was planning on 3-4 weeks last fall with my 1% batch, but with complications it went almost 7 weeks.
No sign of bad meat and I haven't poisoned the couple dozen people that have sampled it.
John, you can also trim that cure back to at least .20% it’s just a half percent but is perfectly fine. I’ll run some numbers for you, but you really only need about 100ppm nitrite to make a beautiful product.
 
...
John, you can also trim that cure back to at least .20% it’s just a half percent but is perfectly fine. I’ll run some numbers for you, but you really only need about 100ppm nitrite to make a beautiful product.
Thanks, Eric.
I've been thinking about that with the longer cure times. It will be a balance with the reduced sodium driving the nitrite into the meat.
My last dry cure was 2 pork tenderloins and they were perfect. Added your black forest rub to one of them and my wife was a happy camper.

Commercial bacon is around 125 ppm nitrite and erythorbate and very wet injected with a very short curing time.
Maybe the starting point?
 
Thanks, Eric.
I've been thinking about that with the longer cure times. It will be a balance with the reduced sodium driving the nitrite into the meat.
My last dry cure was 2 pork tenderloins and they were perfect. Added your black forest rub to one of them and my wife was a happy camper.

Commercial bacon is around 125 ppm nitrite and erythorbate and very wet injected with a very short curing time.
Maybe the starting point?
Commercial is injected and limited to 120ppm and yes must use a cure accelerator such as erythorbate. But with a dry rub, you can also shave some of that cure number off, that’s just to cut a little more sodium if you want. But you certainly don’t have to run cure at 156ppm. You can go down around 70-80ppm but with your already low salt, I’d keep it around 100ppm and north. May help your salt / sodium struggle a little.

And since it’s a dry rub, no erythorbate needed.
 
SmokingMeatForums.com is reader supported and as an Amazon Associate, we may earn commissions from qualifying purchases.
Clicky