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Hypothetical Brisket question?

Japan_Dave_

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Hey All,

I am doing my first brisket this weekend and I planning out how and when to cook it.

With that said and the fact that it is nearly a 22 lbs brisket that is rather thick I am guessing it is going to take some time and I was planning of starting the night before.

Cooking Params:
Pit Temp: 225
Internal temp: 200-203
Spritz: After 3-4 hours in, then every hour
Spritz: Apple cider vineger
Wrap: when internal temp hits 165
Wrap: Butcher paper, 2 layers

Since I will be running over night and it is an offset I am going to need to tend to the fire all night,
OK, my question:
What if I fall asleep for a few hours and say I let the pit temp drop to 160 degrees?
Will this affect the meat or will it just make cook time longer? I am using common sense and will say it will only affect the cook time, but I wanted to ask the experts and see what everyone has to say.

Cheers
 

sawhorseray

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Why not cut the time down and smoke the brisket at 275º-280º. That's what Aaron Franklin runs the smokers at in his restaurant, he seems to have some fair brisket success, briskets do fine at that temperature. Even at the increased temperature a 22 pound packer is going to take a ton of time. I wouldn't even try a packer that size on my offset because I know I'd never be able to stay awake long enough to get the job done properly. If I were to take something like this on I'd start it on my electric Pro 100 the night before and set the alarm for every couple of hours to get up and change the chip pan, then change it over to my SQ36 offset in the morning after I'd had some decent sleep and knew I was going to stay awake to tend the fire. If you fall asleep how do you know if you'll wake up in time to save the fire? Another option you may want to consider is going with chilerelleno chilerelleno 's extreme hot and fast brisket method here, it's what I'd do were I in your position. Good luck! RAY

 

MJB05615

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That's a big Brisket you got there. I agree with Ray, if you sleep through the fire going totally out, you may be in trouble. I've done some 19-20 pounders on my MES 40, electric. I always set my alarm to go off every 2 hours so I can add more wood chips and check on the AMNPS is still going as well. Say I start at 10pm, then checking every 2-3 hours through the night. Once it hits the stall, usually by 12-1pm the next day, then I get caught up on my sleep. Or, as Ray said, check out the high temp hot and fast methods mentioned. I haven't tried yet, but sounds very doable if the end result is good. Let us know how it goes.
 

Japan_Dave_

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Why not cut the time down and smoke the brisket at 275º-280º. That's what Aaron Franklin runs the smokers at in his restaurant, he seems to have some fair brisket success, briskets do fine at that temperature. Even at the increased temperature a 22 pound packer is going to take a ton of time. I wouldn't even try a packer that size on my offset because I know I'd never be able to stay awake long enough to get the job done properly. If I were to take something like this on I'd start it on my electric Pro 100 the night before and set the alarm for every couple of hours to get up and change the chip pan, then change it over to my SQ36 offset in the morning after I'd had some decent sleep and knew I was going to stay awake to tend the fire. If you fall asleep how do you know if you'll wake up in time to save the fire? Another option you may want to consider is going with chilerelleno chilerelleno 's extreme hot and fast brisket method here, it's what I'd do were I in your position. Good luck! RAY

Unfortunately in Japan brisket is just not available and I was able to secure a USDA prime brisket on the net but, it was 22 lbs. In a perfect world I would have gone with smaller cut for sure. I am going to do my best to stay awake to tend the fire, but I need to know if I am in trouble if let it slip to lower temps for some time? I tested the smoker and it only drops to about 160 after about 5 hours, so I have some time to wake and get things started again if needs be.
 

Hijack73

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I'm new here, and I don't know what the consensus is on stuff like this, but I've had to finish things off in the oven more than a few times. A big chunk of anything is only going to take on so much flavor from smoke, and after a time, any cooker becomes nothing more than an oven. So I personally don't mind starting a cook over fire then putting it in a pan in an oven. I have both suspended the meat on a rack and just let it sit in the pan. I cannot even imagine what that piece of meat cost you and if I were in your shoes I'd start it on the smoker 4-5 hours before bedtime, put it in an oven to sleep a few hours, then if you really want to finish it on the offset, bring it back up and finish as you normally would. The answer in my years of smoking to your "what happens if" is that you would PROBABLY be ok. But if you swap outdoor steady heat with indoor steady heat, what's the difference. Think of it as a big electric smoker that you let the chips die in.

I have had to go out, in due to monster thunderstorms that cause flash floods, refire, bring it back up, and finish the cook outsider more than once. I have a habit of doing a rack of ribs in the last few hours of a brisket (or some tasty sausages) so it's worth that refire. If I'm not doing something smoky the last few hours of a cook, and weather goes poop or i just get pooped, that indoor smoker sans smoke works 100% of the time.
 

Japan_Dave_

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I'm new here, and I don't know what the consensus is on stuff like this, but I've had to finish things off in the oven more than a few times. A big chunk of anything is only going to take on so much flavor from smoke, and after a time, any cooker becomes nothing more than an oven. So I personally don't mind starting a cook over fire then putting it in a pan in an oven. I have both suspended the meat on a rack and just let it sit in the pan. I cannot even imagine what that piece of meat cost you and if I were in your shoes I'd start it on the smoker 4-5 hours before bedtime, put it in an oven to sleep a few hours, then if you really want to finish it on the offset, bring it back up and finish as you normally would. The answer in my years of smoking to your "what happens if" is that you would PROBABLY be ok. But if you swap outdoor steady heat with indoor steady heat, what's the difference. Think of it as a big electric smoker that you let the chips die in.

I have had to go out, in due to monster thunderstorms that cause flash floods, refire, bring it back up, and finish the cook outsider more than once. I have a habit of doing a rack of ribs in the last few hours of a brisket (or some tasty sausages) so it's worth that refire. If I'm not doing something smoky the last few hours of a cook, and weather goes poop or i just get pooped, that indoor smoker sans smoke works 100% of the time.
Unfortunately, if you have seen a Japanese electric oven you would be lucky if you could fit a whole small chicken in it. Just not an option, I am going to have to do this the hard way. No questions asked.
 

Chasdev

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Don't think it will be 22lbs after you trim the fat, you should get at least 3lbs of fat, probably more.
225 will take 20/24 hours, I advise against it unless you can do it in a pellet cooker or gravity feed smoker, that's too long for one person to tend fire.
I've done brisket at 225, 250, 275 and after having a 275 cook suffer a temp run-away to 400 and seeing the results I've switched to "hot and fast" and I like the results better.
Dark thick bark and tender juicy meat.
Try 350, use a drip pan and add water after 4/6 hours and spray with apple juice/apple cider vinegar every hour. Cook to 205 internal.
If you have time, let it rest in an insulated cooler/box for 4 hours but remember that hot meat continues to cook after removing from the cook chamber so pull before 200/205 if you are going to "hold" or rest the meat in an insulated chamber as it will over cook.
It's hard to say exactly what temp and how long but consider carry over cooking when deciding on what temp to pull and how it will cool off.
Many pitmasters who are considered to be "in the know" hold cooked briskets in a 160 degree resting oven for hours and hours before serving and the longer the meat rests at a safe temp, the more tender it gets.
 

Magic Meat

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Hey All,

I am doing my first brisket this weekend and I planning out how and when to cook it.

With that said and the fact that it is nearly a 22 lbs brisket that is rather thick I am guessing it is going to take some time and I was planning of starting the night before.

Cooking Params:
Pit Temp: 225
Internal temp: 200-203
Spritz: After 3-4 hours in, then every hour
Spritz: Apple cider vineger
Wrap: when internal temp hits 165
Wrap: Butcher paper, 2 layers

Since I will be running over night and it is an offset I am going to need to tend to the fire all night,
OK, my question:
What if I fall asleep for a few hours and say I let the pit temp drop to 160 degrees?
Will this affect the meat or will it just make cook time longer? I am using common sense and will say it will only affect the cook time, but I wanted to ask the experts and see what everyone has to say.

Cheers
If you have an oven with a temp probe I would 100% finish it in the oven.
I have a Kitchenaid oven that has a temp probe and automatically shuts the oven off once the probe hits the programmed temp.
When I do big cuts I start them at 5am on the smoker, give it the smoke & color and wrap, usually after 8 hours in, then I continue on the smoker until i can't stand it any longer usually about midnight, then i set the oven at 300, set the probe at 200 and go to bed, most of the time it will finish around 5-6 AM and be resting in a gradually cooling oven and it works awesome every time and I still get my beauty sleep lol.
 

unclebubbas bbq

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I would cook it @ 250 until you get the color and bark you are looking for, then wrap it in butcher's paper and stick it in the oven to finish.
 

SmokinVOLfan

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Sounds like you have a pretty good game plan. Make sure you got plenty of beer on hand since this will be a long smoke! Since you don't have the option of finishing this in the oven due to the size I say go for it but at a higher temp if possible. I agree once you trim you will probably get 3 or more pounds of fat off of it so that will decrease the size. If you crash for a couple hours and the smoker temp drops it wont kill you just increase your time. Good luck with this and post some pics for us!
 

schlotz

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Personally would not use apple cider vinegar. 50/50 Kosher salt & freshly ground black pepper and have at it. Some will spritz others won't, I prefer not to spritz. I'm going to bet trimming will remove closer to 4 pounds of fat still leaving 1/4" on the cap. Definitely go with 270-280º for smoker temp. With that it should start getting done somewhere around the 15-16th hour. BTW: 200-203º IT is ONLY a guide line. Every piece of meat can be different. I've had them get done anywhere from 198-210º. The true test of being done is to probe the flat in many places especially in the thicker parts and when it feels like going in & out of a jar of peanut butter it's time to pull. If you are going to be serving dinner I would give yourself plenty of extra time and would plan for getting done 4 hours early. Once pulled, let it rest open on the counter until the IT drops approx 8º (indication the cooking has ceased) then re-wrap and put in a cooler with towels. It should keep just fine.

Good Luck!
 

Japan_Dave_

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I just pulled the meat from fridge and I am pretty sure this is not a brisket, although it is shaped like one with what even looks like the point. The thing is there is not much fat on this thing and I can't see two types of meat in it. It is labeled "Shoulder" in Japanese which I am guessing is what you guys call Chuck??? Like I said before, it is really hard to get brisket here in Japan and anything you can buy is always online so no seeing the cut before buying.

Anyways too late now, I switched my plan to pulled beef and try for some nice bark.
 

Magic Meat

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I just pulled the meat from fridge and I am pretty sure this is not a brisket, although it is shaped like one with what even looks like the point. The thing is there is not much fat on this thing and I can't see two types of meat in it. It is labeled "Shoulder" in Japanese which I am guessing is what you guys call Chuck??? Like I said before, it is really hard to get brisket here in Japan and anything you can buy is always online so no seeing the cut before buying.

Anyways too late now, I switched my plan to pulled beef and try for some nice bark.
Pictures man..pictures.. dress that thing up nice and give us a photo shoot!! lol
 

Magic Meat

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Joined Jun 25, 2020
I just pulled the meat from fridge and I am pretty sure this is not a brisket, although it is shaped like one with what even looks like the point. The thing is there is not much fat on this thing and I can't see two types of meat in it. It is labeled "Shoulder" in Japanese which I am guessing is what you guys call Chuck??? Like I said before, it is really hard to get brisket here in Japan and anything you can buy is always online so no seeing the cut before buying.

Anyways too late now, I switched my plan to pulled beef and try for some nice bark.
It might be a weird high cut brisket or something interesting, like 50% chuck or something intriguing...I think they might cut meat different in Japan..I really want too see !!
 

Japan_Dave_

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It might be a weird high cut brisket or something interesting, like 50% chuck or something intriguing...I think they might cut meat different in Japan..I really want too see !!
When I open it up I will post some pics, won't be for a few hours though.
Cheers
 

tallbm

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Hi there and welcome!

In any case whether it is a brisket or clod or a giant chuck I really think you should smoke at a 275-285F temperature.

At a 275F my unwrapped briskets take a little over an hour a pound and I don't open the smoker until the thermometer tells me to check for tenderness.

SO a 22lb brisket at 275F that would likely take me about 23-24hrs and I don't ever open my smoker to spritz or anything.
If you go 225F you will be tending a smoker for 36hrs or more I believe!!!

Also, a brisket, chuck, clod, pork butt, pork ribs, and some other cuts absolutely do not care what temp they are cooked/smoked at so again I recommend cranking it up!

If there is little to no fat (trimmed brisket or a chuck) I would place in foil once the bark and color are real good, then splash with some sort of liquid and wrap to finish the cook. This should keep it from drying out BUT also give you great smoked bbq beef rather than a roast beef flavor which happens if you wrap too early.

Next, plan your timing very well. Knowing at a constant 275F smoker temp it would take me in my super constant and efficient smoker about 24hrs or so before it got tender and was done.
Always plan to finish 4 hours early so that if you do finish early then good you tightly double wrap in foil, then tightly wrap in 3 bath towles and place on the counter and 4 hours later it will be piping hot and ready to slice and eat!!! If you dont finish 4 hours early... you have 4 hours of buffer to work with before eating time hahaha.

Finally, a brisket is done when it is tender, never on time or temp. The internal temp (IT) will tell you when to check for tenderness, start checking around 200F IT for tenderness by stabing ALL OVER with a kabob skewer. When it goes in like butter ALL OVER then its tender, therefore done. If not tender, wait another degree or 2 and check for tenderness again.


I hope this info helps man and honestly the biggest mess up is people not giving it enough time so I suggest you pick a good hotter temp with the info provided and plan accordingly and give yourself plenty of buffer because even reheated brisket is just as amazing or often even more amazing (having rested) than when its first made. :)
 

Japan_Dave_

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Hi there and welcome!
Thanks.
In any case whether it is a brisket or clod or a giant chuck I really think you should smoke at a 275-285F temperature.
Yeah, re-thinking cooking temp and I was going to try 275F.

I didn't realize but it also says that it is a Chuck Eye Roll in Japanese as well.

Here are un-opened pics.
2020-08-14 12.26.28.jpg

2020-08-14 12.26.42.jpg

2020-08-14 12.26.53.jpg
 

Japan_Dave_

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Unwrapped with rub on. Basic S & P with some garlic flakes. Trimming only took off about 1/2 lbs, there was virtually no thick fat of this thing.

2020-08-14 15.52.37.jpg


2020-08-14 15.52.42.jpg
 

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