Dry cure bacon calculator

Discussion in 'Smoking Bacon' started by bray, Feb 17, 2016.

  1. bray

    bray Newbie

    Any one know where to get this? There is a better one also? Please help.
    Thanks
     
  2. smokin monkey

    smokin monkey Master of the Pit Group Lead OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Last edited: Feb 17, 2016
  3. bray

    bray Newbie

    Thanks for the info!!!!!👍
     
  4. c farmer

    c farmer Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    I use the Diggingdog farm one
     
  5. dirtsailor2003

    dirtsailor2003 Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    As do I. Made some of the best bacon to date last batch. The biggest difference I did with this batch was letting age 5 days after the cure before smoking and then again letting age after smoking for another week. The white pepper that I added was a hit and we will be doing that again too.

    http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/236348/rubbed-the-belly-its-bacon-time
     
  6. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    FWIW:....

    Dry rubbed cured bacon.....   max ingoing nitrite 200 Ppm.. skin off.....

    Brined / injected / massaged bacon.....   max ingoing nitrite 120 Ppm.... skin off.....

    Skin on.... reduce the ingoing nitrite by 10%....

    These recommended amounts are for US manufacturers by the USDA.... Also, the  USDA does not allow nitrate to be added to bacon  by manufacturers...
     
  7. buckinducks

    buckinducks Smoke Blower

    I had a 7# piece of belly , ended up wet brine. However the overal volume of sugar salt cure the digging calculator told me , did not seem like it would have been enough to spread over the belly. Maybe I am wrong.
     
  8. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    How much of what and what did you do....
     
  9. wade

    wade Master of the Pit OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    It often does not seem a lot when it is spread over belly because of its large surface area. When curing the same weight of back bacon it usually does not all stick and you end up pouring the remainder of the cure into the bag with the meat.

    Assuming that you were after 2.5% salt and 1% sugar at 200 ppm ingoing Nitrite you would have had just over 110 grams of cure to rub in. Once you have rubbed it onto the meat and placed it in the plastic bag the pork starts to produce its own brine as water is drawn out and, providing you turn it regularly, the brine solution evenly coats the entire surface of the meat. 
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2016

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