Curing, pounds and ounces.

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Much of what I cure is bacon, buckboard bacon, Taylor Pork Roll, or Canadian bacon... all of which will fried in a pan at high heat like bacon. So it is all "bacon" from the way I cook it.
Because of this, and the USFDA stance on carcinogenic nitrosamines developed by frying bacon with nitrAte, I personally want to comply with the USFDA FSIS guidelines that all commercial producers are held to in the US: zero nitrAtes allowed in bacon, and just 120ppm nitrite for pumped or immersion cured.

So to me, THAT is a huge difference between cure1, and Tenderquick which contains nitrAtes. One allows me to comply with bacon health and safety guidelines, the other doesn't. I realize as a non commercial maker, I don't have to comply... but if family or guests ever knew about USFDA bacon cure limits, and I had to admit I wasn't following them... well, no one would ever eat my charcuterie again, I'm pretty sure.
Don’t get too caught up In it all. I know this can all be confusing, but really curing meat is a straightforward process. Yes, nitrates are not necessary for short term curing, but nitrates are a bit more complicated than that in process. So yes, nitrite is all you need. Relax a bit and make some successful bacon. This is really easy, and fun as well as safe.
 
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Don’t get too caught up In it all. I know this can all be confusing, but really curing meat is a straightforward process. Yes, nitrates are not necessary for short term curing, but nitrates are a bit more complicated than that in process. So yes, nitrite is all you need. Relax a bit and make some successful bacon. This is really easy, and fun as well as safe.
Don't dismiss it that easily.

After the "bacon is bad" scare in the 70's and 80's, the USDA narrowed it down to the formation of nitrosamines from any nitrAtes and excess nitrItes in cured meats that get cooked at high heat.
Nitrosamine formation is the reason ALL commercial injection cured meat must use only nitrIte and have a cure accelerator (usually sodium erythorbate) to insure depletion to the 120 ppm level.

I have no idea why Tender Quick is still on the market.
 
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My better advice is to have 2 scales in house.
1 unit that goes to higher levels (mine goes to 15#) and can give readings in pounds, ounces, grams, and kilograms. I paid $30
2 a micro scale that goes down to milligrams. I paid $15 to get the calibrating weight
 
Maybe go back to post #1 and read it again! This thread had a simple question from a newbie, and this has turned into way more than teaching someone new the basics! Granted I understand it now but when I was new it would have confused the hell out of me.
And for the record...not many years ago they said eggs were bad for you also...

Ryan
 
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I have a very simple system I use for curing bacon.

1 kg meat

100 ml water
25 g sugar
16 g salt
3 g Cure #1

Mix water and cure ingredients together. Pour into bag with pork. Evacuate most of the air and seal. Flip daily. Smoke or cook after 7 - 10 days.

This 10% brine can also be injected for thicker meat cuts or quicker curing.

You can also edit the salt and sugar slightly for more sweetness/saltiness. Do not adjust amount of cure #1 per kg.

JC :emoji_cat:
 
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It also requires a higher temp than you keep a normal fridge at so the nitrate converting bacteria can grow in sufficient numbers, no?
I have not heard that. I've done decades of curing in my beer fridge which is 37°-ish. I do know that if your fridge gets into the low 30°s the curing process slows down.
I have no idea why Tender Quick is still on the market.
Marketability, and the 'ol "We've always done it that way" philosophy. And... the fact home cured products don't have to comply to the same rules as commercial curing operations do. You may recall a sister product to TQ called Morton Sugar Cure. It was sweeter and came with a spice packet to add if needed for a particular recipe. Over time, the price of sugar rose so much that Morton discontinued it. Almost immediately several other companies introduced their version of a sugar cure mix.

Big game hunting is very popular where I live and TQ is everywhere, and anytime I mention Cure #1, a typical reply will mention "my Grandparents..." or "... our family recipe". It's funny but my Grandparents used it too.
 
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Much of what I cure is bacon, buckboard bacon, Taylor Pork Roll, or Canadian bacon... all of which will fried in a pan at high heat like bacon. So it is all "bacon" from the way I cook it.
Because of this, and the USFDA stance on carcinogenic nitrosamines developed by frying bacon with nitrAte, I personally want to comply with the USFDA FSIS guidelines that all commercial producers are held to in the US: zero nitrAtes allowed in bacon, and just 120ppm nitrite for pumped or immersion cured.

So to me, THAT is a huge difference between cure1, and Tenderquick which contains nitrAtes. One allows me to comply with bacon health and safety guidelines, the other doesn't. I realize as a non commercial maker, I don't have to comply... but if family or guests ever knew about USFDA bacon cure limits, and I had to admit I wasn't following them... well, no one would ever eat my charcuterie again, I'm pretty sure.

Don't dismiss it that easily.

After the "bacon is bad" scare in the 70's and 80's, the USDA narrowed it down to the formation of nitrosamines from any nitrAtes and excess nitrItes in cured meats that get cooked at high heat.
Nitrosamine formation is the reason ALL commercial injection cured meat must use only nitrIte and have a cure accelerator (usually sodium erythorbate) to insure depletion to the 120 ppm level.

I have no idea why Tender Quick is still on the market.
Uh oh. 120ppms and nitrosamines, sodium erythorbate and insuring depletion! Maybe I should just keep buying bacon at Kroger.
 
Uh oh. 120ppms and nitrosamines, sodium erythorbate and insuring depletion! Maybe I should just keep buying bacon at Kroger.
LOL making bacon is a fairly safe process so long as you follow some simple guidelines.
 
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Uh oh. 120ppms and nitrosamines, sodium erythorbate and insuring depletion! Maybe I should just keep buying bacon at Kroger.
The evolution of bacon through say the 1900's sort of sets the stage for the levels of charcuterie that exists today. Both in the custom meat markets and at home. My grandfather cured bacon in a 'salt box' and I suspect salt petre was the curing agent of choice, but it was still an eyeball kind of craft that was dominated by men, at least in my family. In the last 10 or 15 years, everyone I know that cures meats at home has really stepped up their game. But speaking of grocery stores... even their bacon has evolved so that shoppers have a variety of choices from the pre-packaged bacon over by the hot dogs, to the deli-bacon in the meat case. This VIDEO from Benton's is a good example of how a company sticks to the old school method of salt curing, and heavy smoke to make a wonderful product.
 
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Well T Tybo , If you want more info I believe disco disco has some videos of curing bacon. I think it's in the hot smoking bacon forum, or do a search. It's not as complicated as you think, any other questions feel free to send me a private message!

Ryan
 
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The evolution of bacon through say the 1900's sort of sets the stage for the levels of charcuterie that exists today. Both in the custom meat markets and at home. My grandfather cured bacon in a 'salt box' and I suspect salt petre was the curing agent of choice, but it was still an eyeball kind of craft that was dominated by men, at least in my family. In the last 10 or 15 years, everyone I know that cures meats at home has really stepped up their game. But speaking of grocery stores... even their bacon has evolved so that shoppers have a variety of choices from the pre-packaged bacon over by the hot dogs, to the deli-bacon in the meat case. This VIDEO from Benton's is a good example of how a company sticks to the old school method of salt curing, and heavy smoke to make a wonderful product.
Benton's makes a very good bacon and country ham. I've been there a bunch of times. Smells phenomenal in there
 
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