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Campania Salami (Orange Zest, Fennel, Garlic)

indaswamp

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Be curious as to well the orange flavor holds through the 6 week process.
I used 4.2 grams/Kg. of Fresh Lemon zest when I made the Pistachio and Lemon salami and the lemon flavor was there, though not strong. The 3 grams of dried (which is equal to 10 grams of fresh) orange zest in the Campania should really come through. I was surprised the sticks turned orange after fermentation! I am anxious to sample it!
 

SmokinEdge

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I noticed the orange color. Kinda neat.
I had read somewhere that in about 4-5 weeks the citrus flavor gets lost, or at least it can. In the article they addressed that issue. I’ll have to see if I can find that. In the meantime I’ll be curious how this turns out for you.
 

Mmmm Meat

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Nice shot on that doe in the other thread. I'm looking forward to the next hunting season here. Venison's not my favorite table fare but there's a lot of good looking recipes for whole muscle and fermented venison sausages on the internet. We can only take one deer per year up here in WA so I'll be looking for a big rutty buck just perfect for the grind.
 

SCBBQ

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Look forward to trading some samples with you guys if you are up for it..
 

SCBBQ

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One of my fennel recipes had Sambuca in it - wonder what this recipe with a little bit of Cointreau would do...
 

indaswamp

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Did you use the 2 guys and a cooler recipe?

Liquors have higher alcohol content and the higher alcohol has antimicrobial properties. My understanding is that it is not good for use in salamis.
 

indaswamp

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...

edit-
disregard... the recipe is for 5#, not 1 kilo... And 5# is roughly 2 kilos so the 10 grams sugar is roughly 5 grams per kilo which is the right amount...
 
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SmokinEdge

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too much dextrose ....
cut that back to 2 grams dextrose and 3 grams sucrose.
Agreed.
Where do these people come up with these recipes? 10 grams of T-spx per 5 pounds of mince??? Should be around 0.3 grams for 5 pounds.
10 grams of dextrose or 15 grams sugar????
Clearly a sign of internet recipes posted by people who have no clue. That recipe is straight up nuts.
 

SmokinEdge

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See my edit...
My point on sugar was the interchangeable dextrose at 10g OR 15g sucrose. They are not interchangeable in salami. They both serve a purpose. Include the liquor and the fresh garlic and my view is to cut dextrose way back and forget sugar (sucrose). Anyway they can continue to happily make internet salami. No skin off me. I won’t be eating it.
 

indaswamp

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Some cultures can metabolize both sucrose and dextrose....tspx being one of them. But F-RM-52 can only utilize the dextrose so I dunno why Hank used those two cultures interchangeably with either dextrose OR sucrose.

There is a benefit to using 1/3 dextrose and 2/3 sucrose with a culture that can convert both....the dextrose will give a fast small pH drop while the sucrose will take longer to produce acid giving the flavor bacteria more time to do their work with optimum pH conditions...
 
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SmokinEdge

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Some cultures can metabolize both sucrose and dextrose....tspx being one of them. But F-RM-52 can only utilize the dextrose so I dunno why Hank used those two cultures interchangeably with either dextrose OR sucrose.

There is a benefit to using 1/3 dextrose and 2/3 sucrose with a culture that can convert both....the dextrose will give a fast small pH drop while the sucrose will take longer to produce acid giving the flavor bacteia more time to do their work with optimum pH conditions...
Yup
 

SCBBQ

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I think Hank was recommending SPX on this Finicchiona recipe - and he explained his overuse of cultures some and then again in the question / comment section again- so far in my journey of f 6 batches (so not a lot of experience) , I’ve put half a packet of culture per recipe (12 grams) for around pounds of meat . Might be too much but I’m not aware of a penalty for too much ?
I’ll let you guys know how this recipe turns out in a few months - meanwhile I had success with his other recipe and it turned out great , to me and friends at least ..

 

SCBBQ

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Edit - I see where he recommends either culture in this recipe -
 

indaswamp

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I think Hank was recommending SPX on this Finicchiona recipe - and he explained his overuse of cultures some and then again in the question / comment section again- so far in my journey of f 6 batches (so not a lot of experience) , I’ve put half a packet of culture per recipe (12 grams) for around pounds of meat . Might be too much but I’m not aware of a penalty for too much ?
I’ll let you guys know how this recipe turns out in a few months - meanwhile I had success with his other recipe and it turned out great , to me and friends at least ..

Well....

The only disadvantage to adding too much culture is the logarithmic growth of the culture will be faster. That impacts fermentation time. It also has an effect on the stability of the proteins and fat in the salami as there is such a thing as too much Proteolysis and Lipolysis within the salami. There has actually been research done on this and that is the reason for the dosage recommendations on the packages of different cultures.

For flavor of italy,
I use 1 gram for the first kilo and 0.25g for each kilo after up to 5kg.
If I am making more than 5Kg. then I just measure out 0.25g per kilo.

The initial 1g. is just to ensure I have enough viable culture as recommended by people way more experienced than me.

I bought a 50g pouch of Flavor of Italy and used it to make every salami you have seem me post with the exception of one. So It has lasted a while....I also used it on 125# of snack sticks.....
 

SCBBQ

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Wow - ok will keep that in mind - hopefully won’t impact these 4 current batches too much.
 

Mmmm Meat

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Marianski Bros. book recommends 1/4 tsp T-SPX per 5Kg (11 LBS.) meat. That 25 g packet has enough culture to inoculate 440 pounds of meat. Using that amount ensures that the good bacteria will greatly outnumber and outcompete any bad bugs in the meat.
 

Mmmm Meat

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Regarding the Hank Shaw recipe - other than the obviously wrong amount of culture and the questionable recommendation for dextrose/sucrose use, it still appears to be a safe recipe as far as I can see. I don't see it killing anybody if they follow the recipe accurately. It may end up being a very tart/sour final product, but not poisonous. In my mind, safety is paramount in any salami recipe uploaded to the internet. It all sounds pretty easy and with all the videos on Salami making on YouTube, many people are willing to give it a try without any understanding of how important it is to follow the directions exactly. That is where it might become dangerous.

I get the feeling that some of these headscratcher recipes come from those passed from generation to generation in Italy and eventually, the US. No one changed them much, (even if they don't make sense to us) because they always created as safe and tasty product. In many ways, those generations of Salami makers never really understood how and why the ferment and drying progresses the way it does.
 
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