Are there any house Painters on the forum?

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Bunch of things will do it but agree 80G is pretty coarse and prime suspect. Other factors are be lack of adhesion of top coat, humidity, dust or other contamination.

60-80G is like shaping grit to me, pretty much exterior only for big chips and nasty stuff. Usually ROS/power. 150-200G is my go to for typical paint by hand to feather stuff and remove dust nibs.

LOL forgot I was in beast mode and posted those pics... Here's a shot of the finished. HUGE thank you and shout out to Rich chopsaw chopsaw for the architectural trim guidance!

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I have to paint all the trim in our new to us house, and was wondering if the product "Flood Floetrol" works and if it is worth buying?

If so, how much do you add per gallon?

I'm using Benjamin Moore "Ben" interior acrylic paint and primer Semi Gloss.

Thanks for the pro tips, I'm rolling the old doors until we replace them and painting the door, window trim, and base boards with fine Chinex brisle brushes.

Thanks a bunch.
Dan. painter and decorator london
Just want to ask people's thoughts on repainting a property that has very colourful interior, as I'm not sure how much extra this will cost. I only managed to get very rough estimate so far and I can't DIY. For anyone with experience, anything to consider? I just don't want to get caught off-guard with the pricing later on.
 
Going from one extreme to another is always more labor/coats. First office was walnut stained paneling to white. 5 coats and still was not perfect. Have gone cream to hunter green was 4 coats. All top end paint too. Best solution is to get owner to agree some midway point that is less extreme so labor is typical. If by colorful you mean say vibrant stuff like yellow etc, it won't be too bad, it's the bright to dark (tint to shades) and vice versa. Black to white being the worst. FIL was a master at working with people on this. Lighter colors "turn white" very fast. For that job I would say let's do that color but let's try a shade or 2 darker for first coat and see how you like it. When customers want dark, the opposite. A level or 2 lighter. The key being they realize it's the same color, you're just adjusting the intensity.
 
P paulgeorge If you're painting the entire place the same color get a GOOD quality primer like Sherwin Pro-Block or Ben Moore Fresh Start and have it tinted to the color of the finish coat,if you're doing rooms in different colors this applies to each room and if everything is going to be a light color then you can go with white.Paint and primer in one sounds great in theory but doesn't usually apply in the real world. Proper prep like sanding, caulking,fixing of defects like holes and gouges should be addressed with the proper filler for the surface to be repaired.

Any good painting contractor should tell you these things and include it in his estimate.
 
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Will have to try primer for that one day. Was taught primer was only for raw wood/fixing possible adhesion issues but taht could save some serious dough nowadays.

While I got ya normanaj normanaj what finish would you go with on the newer trimmed wall style? Normally I would say satin but looks basically flat. Have not run any of yet and redoing my office lobby.

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lol
Will have to try primer for that one day. Was taught primer was only for raw wood/fixing possible adhesion issues but taht could save some serious dough nowadays.

While I got ya normanaj normanaj what finish would you go with on the newer trimmed wall style? Normally I would say satin but looks basically flat. Have not run any of yet and redoing my office lobby.

View attachment 689854
Generally you wouldn't need to prime previously painted sound surfaces but with significant color changes it really helps especially on walls.

I'm personally not a big fan of flat on anything other than ceilings. In a commercial situation like rentals etc flat is good because it's easily touched up especially after patching holes and the like.

On a wall like that an eggshell/satin on the panels and a semi on the styles and rails always looks good but that's a personal preference. Any paint with a sheen is recommended for cleanability and durability.
 
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Going from one extreme to another is always more labor/coats. First office was walnut stained paneling to white. 5 coats and still was not perfect. Have gone cream to hunter green was 4 coats. All top end paint too. Best solution is to get owner to agree some midway point that is less extreme so labor is typical. If by colorful you mean say vibrant stuff like yellow etc, it won't be too bad, it's the bright to dark (tint to shades) and vice versa. Black to white being the worst. FIL was a master at working with people on this. Lighter colors "turn white" very fast. For that job I would say let's do that color but let's try a shade or 2 darker for first coat and see how you like it. When customers want dark, the opposite. A level or 2 lighter house painters. The key being they realize it's the same color, you're just adjusting the intensity.
thank you so much for your suggestion
 
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