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15.5# bone in rib roast cook

Buddy1969

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Morning all - I've done 6#-8# several time with great success, but never anything this big. Am I being too ambitious trying to leave it whole for presentation purposes? Thinking 6ish hrs to 130 should work, but really am just shooting in the dark. Any advice?
 

chilerelleno

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The only difference is size and time.
You were successful before and you'll be successful this time.
You're overthinking it and worrying about nothing.
 

jaxgatorz

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It will depend on your smoker temp.. I like to smoke my rib roasts at 225. That gives me equal doneness across the whole roast.. In fact, I am throwing a 7 1/2 lb roast on as we speak.. I expect up to 5 hours on mine .. Yours is double the weight..
 

normanaj

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The process is the same regardless of size.Like Chile said the only difference is size and time.Relax and have a few cocktails.
 

SmokinGame

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Interested in what others will offer because I have only done one rib roast that big. I really didn't do anything different from a smaller one, just used a couple probes for IT to insure I was getting a pretty even cook. I was using a Camp Chef pellet and options for placement is limited, but I did rotate it 180 a couple of times.
 

Buddy1969

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Interested in what others will offer because I have only done one rib roast that big. I really didn't do anything different from a smaller one, just used a couple probes for IT to insure I was getting a pretty even cook. I was using a Camp Chef pellet and options for placement is limited, but I did rotate it 180 a couple of times.
You remember roughly how long it took? Understanding there are a lot of variables and I'm going to temp, but just kinda interested in a ballpark idea.
 

SmokinGame

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You remember roughly how long it took? Understanding there are a lot of variables and I'm going to temp, but just kinda interested in a ballpark idea.
It has been a few months, but your 6 hours seems a little short. Of course, depends on your smoke temp. I believe a rule of thumb is around 30 minutes per pound at 250F. That would put yours in that 7-1/2 to 8 hour range.
 

thirdeye

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Morning all - I've done 6#-8# several time with great success, but never anything this big. Am I being too ambitious trying to leave it whole for presentation purposes? Thinking 6ish hrs to 130 should work, but really am just shooting in the dark. Any advice?
The only disadvantage to leaving a 6 or 7 bone roast whole is you only get two end cuts, and some people really favor an end cut. Once you get over 11 or 12 pounds the length/diameter works in your favor and cook time moves closer together. For example, lets say you had an average 8" long pork loin roast and it reaches 145° in 90 minutes. Cooking a 15" or 18" long loin roast will take about the same amount of time because the diameter is about the same, it just is longer. Keep in mind that 'shape' on a rib roast will vary from roast to roast more than my example of a pork loin... so always monitor with a thermometer.

I use a maximum of 250° for my cook times and below are some times from a database of prime rib cooks you could use as a gusstimate for your big day. Don't forget carryover temp, because a large roast will gain a few degrees while resting. To play it safe, don't schedule an absolute sit down time and to really play it safe, while the roast rests, warm up a cast iron skillet on your cooker. If anyone's slice looks too rare for them, zap that slice for a few seconds on each side and serve with the most 'done looking' side up. This fools the eyes into thinking it's more cooked than it really is. Once they bite, they will probably love it. All that said, after a couple of hours if you notice your internal temp rising a little too fast, ramp down your cooker so the internal temp will ease up to your preferred doneness.

10 pound roast - 220°-228° pit temp - 3 hours to reach 120°
11 pound roast (4 bones) - 215° average pit temp - 4 hours 54 minutes to reach 125°
14 pound roast - 220°-250° pit temp - 4 hours 30 minutes to reach 125°
15 pound roast - 220°-250° pit temp - 4 hrs 50 min to reach 127°
19.5 pound roast (prime grade) - 240° pit temp (dome temp) - 4 hours 25 minutes to reach 124°
 

civilsmoker

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The only disadvantage to leaving a 6 or 7 bone roast whole is you only get two end cuts, and some people really favor an end cut. Once you get over 11 or 12 pounds the length/diameter works in your favor and cook time moves closer together. For example, lets say you had an average 8" long pork loin roast and it reaches 145° in 90 minutes. Cooking a 15" or 18" long loin roast will take about the same amount of time because the diameter is about the same, it just is longer. Keep in mind that 'shape' on a rib roast will vary from roast to roast more than my example of a pork loin... so always monitor with a thermometer.

I use a maximum of 250° for my cook times and below are some times from a database of prime rib cooks you could use as a gusstimate for your big day. Don't forget carryover temp, because a large roast will gain a few degrees while resting. To play it safe, don't schedule an absolute sit down time and to really play it safe, while the roast rests, warm up a cast iron skillet on your cooker. If anyone's slice looks too rare for them, zap that slice for a few seconds on each side and serve with the most 'done looking' side up. This fools the eyes into thinking it's more cooked than it really is. Once they bite, they will probably love it. All that said, after a couple of hours if you notice your internal temp rising a little too fast, ramp down your cooker so the internal temp will ease up to your preferred doneness.

10 pound roast - 220°-228° pit temp - 3 hours to reach 120°
11 pound roast (4 bones) - 215° average pit temp - 4 hours 54 minutes to reach 125°
14 pound roast - 220°-250° pit temp - 4 hours 30 minutes to reach 125°
15 pound roast - 220°-250° pit temp - 4 hrs 50 min to reach 127°
19.5 pound roast (prime grade) - 240° pit temp (dome temp) - 4 hours 25 minutes to reach 124°
Bingo!!!! 4 bone and above all take about the same time given a similar diameter cross section....under 4 bone takes less because the distance from the cut ends is less than the diameter cross section.....
 

SmokinAl

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^^^^^^^ What Civilsmoker said!
The thickness of the meat, not the pounds are what matters.
Al
 

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