when is it to cold to cold smoke bacon

Discussion in 'Bacon' started by mattyoc20, Jan 16, 2014.

  1. mattyoc20

    mattyoc20 Smoke Blower

    Just put about 10 pounds of belly in the WSM. I'm looking to smoke til about noon tomorrow. Its going to get down to around 28 in my neck of the woods tonight. Is that going to be an issue? The only think I'm using is the amazen pellet tray lit at 1 end
     
  2. dave17a

    dave17a Smoking Fanatic

    Takes longer the colder. Good color.
     
  3. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Add some heat to keep the temp above 50 if the AMNPS doesn't..... It should if you have a small insulated smoker... Throw a blanket over the WSM if it needs it...
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2014
  4. dave17a

    dave17a Smoking Fanatic

    Good Mahogany color is what you need I should say. Got 36#,s curing now untill next Thursday or so. Good Luck. Dave

    Little blury
     
  5. mattyoc20

    mattyoc20 Smoke Blower

    Why does it have to be above 50 it shouldn't hurt anything being colder right. Just may take a bit longer? Or so I thought
     
  6. shoneyboy

    shoneyboy Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    I'm not trying to :hijack: this thread, but I was always lead to believe that the colder the better.... I just want to see where this goes...... ShoneyBoy
     
  7. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Below is how Marianski describes what cold smoking is and does...

    What was the temp ?? Did the AMNPS keep the temp up ??

    Cold Smoking

    Cold smoking at 52-71° F (12-22° C), from 1-14 days, applying thin smoke with occasional breaks in between, is one of the oldest preservation methods. We cannot produce cold smoke if the outside temperature is 90° F (32° C), unless we can cool it down, which is what some industrial smokers do. Cold smoking is a drying process whose purpose is to remove moisture thus preserving a product.

    You will find that different sources provide different temperatures for cold smoking. In European countries where most of the cold smoking is done, the upper temperature is accepted as 86° F (30° C). The majority of Russian, Polish and German meat technology books call for 71° F (22° C), some books ask for 77° F (25° C). Fish starts to cook at 85° F (29.4° C) and if you want to make delicious cold smoked salmon that is smoked for a long time, obviously you can not exceed 86° F (30° C). Cold smoking assures us of total smoke penetration inside of the meat. The loss of moisture also is uniform in all areas and the total weight loss falls within 5-20% depending largely on the smoking time. Cold smoking is not a continuous process, it is stopped (no smoke) a few times to allow fresh air into the smoker.
     
  8. mattyoc20

    mattyoc20 Smoke Blower

    Thanks for the info.  I smoked my last bacon when it was about 50 degrees outside and it was awesome.  I smoked it for 22 hours with maple.  Due to time constraints I can not smoke, stop, then continue smoking.  I put the bacon in last night at 5pm and plan on taking off today at 2ish.  I guess I will see what the differences is between the two.  Like they say there is no bad bacon, just good bacon and better bacon.  Thanks everyone for the input.
     
  9. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Did you notice what the temp was in the smoker... Maybe the AMNPS kept the temp up.... they do put out a fair amount of heat....
     
  10. mattyoc20

    mattyoc20 Smoke Blower

    I didn't even bother checking.  I wasn't going to throw coals in and fight the smoker to keep temp for 22 hours so i figured it is what it is.regardless of temp, not proper note taking but ah well.
     
  11. mattyoc20

    mattyoc20 Smoke Blower

    I don't really have the color i want and I'm getting ready to leave for the weekend. Would it be a problem if I take it off now and throw it back in the smoker Sunday night?
     
  12. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    No problem at all.... They recommend breaks in smoking.... I think that was so the fire didn't have to be tended all night... Dave
     
  13. mattyoc20

    mattyoc20 Smoke Blower

    Just pulled the bacon after 22 hours of cold smoke and I have these black spots in them. Anyone know what they are? Is my bacon ruined?
     
  14. mneeley490

    mneeley490 Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Looks like soot has dropped down from the top or lid of your smoker. I have found that happens more often when cold smoking. You need to wipe down the inside of your smoker before using again.

    I doubt the bacon is ruined. Just wipe off as much as you can with a wet paper towel, and then dry off the bacon again.
     
  15. mattyoc20

    mattyoc20 Smoke Blower

    These spots were on the bottom of the bacon and I actually wiped down the smoker before putting in the bacon
     
  16. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Were the vents wide open on the smoker.... Is your smoker clean......
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2014
  17. mattyoc20

    mattyoc20 Smoke Blower

    Smoker is clean and I did have the vents wide open.
     
  18. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    The spots look like creosote drops..... maybe something from the food grate ??? Rinse and dry the slabs.. add additional smoke if you feel they need it... see it the spots come off... Hard to tell from here what is going on.....

    Dave
     
  19. centex99

    centex99 Fire Starter

    What temperature is too HOT?  I thought as long as the fat doesn't start melting out, you'll be ok... I'm smoking a batch of bacon today (likely one tomorrow too as I'm using two different woods on this belly)... this one is PMC and going to go about 8 hours (pop's brine, some plain, a bit with garlic, and a bit with garlic+pepper)...

    Smoker has been about 100 most of the day... should be fine, no?  After my 8 hours I'm going to rest in the fridge another day or two and then partially freeze to slice up/package...
     
  20. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Pig fat melting temps.....

    Melting point
    backfat: 30–40 °C (86–104 °F)
    leaf fat: 43–48 °C (109–118 °F)
    mixed fat: 36–45 °C (97–113 °F)
     
    thatcho likes this.

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