Ventricina Salami

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MeatCharter

Newbie
Original poster
Jan 31, 2019
9
5
I'm trying to make Ventricina Salami based on the recipe here:

The recipe calls for beef bung which is a little pricey. I'd like to try to use Pre-tied Collagen Casings 100mm instead.

If I'm taking the casing off anyway, would it make a big difference in outcome? Is it worth going to a natural casing? Natural seem like a lot more difficult to work with and are much more expensive.
 
I'm trying to make Ventricina Salami based on the recipe here:

The recipe calls for beef bung which is a little pricey. I'd like to try to use Pre-tied Collagen Casings 100mm instead.

If I'm taking the casing off anyway, would it make a big difference in outcome? Is it worth going to a natural casing? Natural seem like a lot more difficult to work with and are much more expensive.
You can absolutely use a fibrous casing. Most folks do. I don't like beef bungs and prefer fibrous.

You might not have seen, I didn't until recently, but there is a sub forum just for curing and stuff like making salami. It is the best spot for salami posts, I think. Here it is:
 
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You can absolutely use a fibrous casing. Most folks do. I don't like beef bungs and prefer fibrous.

You might not have seen, I didn't until recently, but there is a sub forum just for curing and stuff like making salami. It is the best spot for salami posts, I think. Here it is:
I was trying to find curing subsection prior to posting! Thanks for that.

Cool. Good to know I can go with the collagen/fibrous. I'm just starting to get into this curing hobby, and it's pricey enough!
 
I was trying to find curing subsection prior to posting! Thanks for that.

Cool. Good to know I can go with the collagen/fibrous. I'm just starting to get into this curing hobby, and it's pricey enough!
I will throw this in... 100mm is 4" basically. Really large diameter for a salami. The bigger the diameter, the more difficult the drying!! If you are just starting, and don't have your drying chamber dialed in, I would recommend doing 60mm max diameter. At 4", you almost always get a dry ring exterior by the time center is dry, or more likely center is still mushy. Your production time goes from 6 weeks to like 12 or 15 weeks. If I am doing 4", I don't even attempt to use salami drying methods, I just sous vide cook it like cotto salami and bologna, basic lunchmeats.

You can certainly succeed with a 4" salami, but if just starting I'd stack the odds for easy success my way and go thinner ;)
Maybe indaswamp indaswamp can comment on diameter? My impression is he does 2" mostly?
 
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While what D Dave in AZ is true, Larger size chunks in the salami make drying easier. Water will diffuse to the surface faster. Natural casings help to lessen case hardening as compared to synthetic. But dave it correct-your drying chamber better be dialed in perfectly.
Thank you. If I have my chamber dialed in, would you say the natural casings are still worth it? How much more do natural casing help with case hardening compared to collagen? Any collagen casings better than others?
 
IMO, yes, natural is better than synthetic, but, you will need to be willing to learn how to truss tightly. With synthetic, you can pack tightly with the stuffer and not have to worry about trussing.

Also, you will get better mold coverage with natural....
 
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