Steam juicer verses Straining

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BrianGSDTexoma

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Aug 1, 2018
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So after getting done using my new steam juicer on Mustang Grapes I not crazy about the color. It's a lot lighter. Could just be because its just pulling the juice out which is not purple and leaving the skins pretty much intact. There has to be some water getting into also. Can't really tell about taste as I have not made any jam with it. I went out this morning hoping to pick 5 gallons. Would be enough to make jam, wine and give some to my buddy. I worked hard to get 2 gallons. A lady stopped and talked to me and said was a bumper crop last year. I did my normal method of cooking then straining overnight. Boy the color is a bunch darker. Won't know until tomorrow how much have but guessing 3 quarts. Not going to making wine now. Thinking of mixing half and half light with dark with about 4 quarts of light left over.

I let a friend use the steam juicer for 20 lbs peaches. He really liked it. Got enough juice for 5 gallons wine. I think making wine would be the best use for it.

Look at that beautiful color!

20210810_173920.jpg 20210810_173926.jpg 20210810_173933.jpg
 
I going to check the gravity of both juices. Probably going to be close but that will tell the story. If it close to 1.040 I think will go ahead and do small batch of wine.
 
Like I said all these things are debatable. My Dad makes some killer stuff and you used his exact method. Cook and hang. I plan to try the juicer route. I feel some of the fresh fruit aromas and flavors are cooked off... The standard method is the press but expensive and cleaning/storage fun.

Heads up 1.040 is low even for beer. I think you want 1.080-1.090 or so for wine. https://www.homebrewit.com/pages/hydrometer-basics-for-home-brewing-and-wine-making
 
Like I said all these things are debatable. My Dad makes some killer stuff and you used his exact method. Cook and hang. I plan to try the juicer route. I feel some of the fresh fruit aromas and flavors are cooked off... The standard method is the press but expensive and cleaning/storage fun.

Heads up 1.040 is low even for beer. I think you want 1.080-1.090 or so for wine. https://www.homebrewit.com/pages/hydrometer-basics-for-home-brewing-and-wine-making

I checked this morning on the straining one and it is at 1040. As thick as that juice is need to add some water probably than add sugar to get 1090. The PH is probably going to be pretty low as mustang grapes are very low. . I have some calcium to raise. I going to run some peaches on the steamer.
 
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I think one of the neat things about using wild fruits is that they usually contain enough acidity on their own that they likely do not need help. Peaches and many common fruits are the opposite and are low acid and to make wine with them you'd likely to ADD some acidity. Always best measure to be sure before deciding to add anything. If you take the time to dial in SG, acidity, and use a good yeast, it is almost guaranteed you will have good results. I find all of this interesting but lots of folks don't and skip this and the product suffers. Kinda funny you mention peaches. I had a peach tree at me previous house. I made a few different things with it but the best I did was brandied peaches.
 
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As I already stated, all of these points are questionable. My father prepares some incredible food, and you followed his recipe to the letter. Cooking and hanging I'm going to give the juicer a shot. Some of the fresh fruit scents and flavors seem to have been cooked away... The press is the traditional way, but it is costly and requires a lot of cleaning and storing.


Even for beer, 1.040 is a low number. For wine, I believe you should aim for a pH of 1.080-1.090.
 
One of the nice things about using wild fruits is that they usually have enough acidity on their own and don't require any additional acidity. Peaches and many other common fruits, on the other hand, are low in acidity, so you'd have to add acidity to produce wine with them. It's always a good idea to double-check before adding anything. It's almost certain that if you take the time to adjust the SG, acidity, and yeast, you'll have good results. I find all of this fascinating, but many people do not, and the product suffers as a result. It's amusing that you mention peaches. At my previous residence, I had a peach tree.
 
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I bought mine on e-bay.. about $60 + extra parts.. It works really good...

champion juicer | eBay

I don't believe the seeds get broken.. They get pushed out of the tube with the skins...

No heat in the Champion.. Check out e-bay and look at all what's for sale.. Mine said make offer.. I did and he took it..

Lots of heat in the steamer.. I read up on them and it's like "hot water bath" canning for fruit..
 
I bought mine on e-bay.. about $60 + extra parts.. It works really good...

champion juicer | eBay

I don't believe the seeds get broken.. They get pushed out of the tube with the skins...

No heat in the Champion.. Check out e-bay and look at all what's for sale.. Mine said make offer.. I did and he took it..

Lots of heat in the steamer.. I read up on them and it's like "hot water bath" canning for fruit..
That would be a good price. I will check it out Dave. Thanks
 
I watch a video where this gal was making tomato sauce and said her champion was 45 years old. She uses it all the time. I think she got it new..
 
One of the advantages of choosing wild fruits is that they usually have sufficient acidity and do not require any added acidity. Peaches, like many other popular fruits, have low acidity, therefore you'd have to add acidity to make wine with them. Before adding anything, it's usually a good idea to double-check. If you take the time to tweak the SG, acidity, and yeast, you'll nearly certainly have good results. All of this fascinates me, but many others do not, and as a result, the product suffers. It's funny that you brought up peaches. I used to have a peach tree at my former home. I experimented with a few other recipes, but my favourite was brandied peaches.
 
My friend put up a ton of peach wine using the steamer. He has a tree. He not going to try it for a year. Really wanting to know how it turns out. You hear so much that not suppose to heat fruit for wine.
 
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