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Secrets of Meat Curing and Sausage Making...

daveomak

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Below is one more book I find very interesting....   Has some stuff in it you can't seem to find in todays publications...   Some good explanations also....

The "Freeze 'em Pickle" is a proprietary cure mix they sold...   Based on the addition, they recommend, 1# per 100#'s of meat, and noting the duration meat is stored in barrels or tierces, the cure mix must be around 1.5% nitrite...  They are storing meats for 40 or 60 days or longer, they are equilibrium curing...  I assume, which is stupid to say at the very least, the majority of the cure mix is salt...  other than that, I'm not going to guess...

Many of their method can be used today...   There is a lot to learn from reading this other addition of their books......   Enjoy....

https://archive.org/stream/secretsofmeatcur05hell#page/n5/mode/2up

 

DanMcG

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Thanks Dave, I had this someplace but not in book form.
 

tropics

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Very interesting thanks Dave

Richie
 

Fueling Around

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Found an old (50's?) recipe book that listed "Freeze em Pickle" in the ingredients list.
Search for "Freeze em pickle" resulted in this thread.
Clarification: General web search gave me Frisco Spice as the first result and this SMF thread.
Sorry, still working out this rotation thing
Replaced the photo to make it easier to read
freeze-em-pickle-r.jpg
 
Last edited:

daveomak

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Fueling Around

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Not planning to use the recipe.
Just ran into an unknown term that deserved some research.
The fact a Google search led me to SMF and a post from you said volumes...
"Freeze em pickle"
From what I can tell, it's a 1910's version of cure#1.....

Use cure#1 in it's place with today's recommendations for use...
It was developed by Heller and Co.


...
Freeze-Em-Pickle is still sold today by Frisco Spices of Omaha

Good book to read. Company was around for over 100 years and then disappeared in early turn of the century?

From the description Freeze-Em-Pickle may or may not be a cure #1

The term "sweet" may indicate added sugars.
It probably means the meat doesn't have an off flavor?

Thinking to another common product ... butter.
Today's labels still state "sweet cream" butter.
Way (way way) back butter was often made from old or soured cream.
Taste preference is for butter from fresh or sweet cream.


-John
 

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chopsaw

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Page 8 bottom right under collections .
Took alot of looking ,, man that place has alot of stuff . Interesting stuff , in no certain order . Bookmarked the page .
 

Fueling Around

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Sorry Dave
Thanks Chop.
I had already bookmarked the page on Freeze-Em-Pickle, but posted the home page so people could see the big picture.
Hundreds of products from what I can see.

I've tried emailing them twice for clarification on the pickle, but it gets rejected.
My isp didn't have a good reputation so many firewalls still reject it.
 

daveomak

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OK !!!! Finally found Freeze 'em Pickle....

FREEZE-EM PICKLE R02991 • 50# box/R01937 • 25/1# bags Ingredients:
Salt, Sodium Nitrate (12.0%), Sodium Nitrite (1.50%), Dextrose, with not more than 2% Propylene Glycol and Sodium Bicarbonate added to prevent caking.Use: Up to 1# per 100# meat, and up to 58# per 100 gallons pickle for 10% pump.

If used as a dry rub....

Nitrate.... 454 X 0.12 (12%) = 54 grams per pound .. 54 grams per 100#'s (45,400 g)= 1,200 Ppm

Nitrite ... 454 X 0.015 (1.5%) = 6.8 grams per pound.. 6.8 g per 100%'s (45,400g) = 150 Ppm....

10% pump.....
100 gal. X 8.35 # per gal.= 835#'s water... 835 X 454 = 379,100 g
nitrate 54 g X 58#'s = 3,132 g nitrate
3,132 / 379,100 = 8,262 Ppm nitrate X 0.1 (10% pump) = 826 Ppm nitrate in pumped meat..

nitrite 6.8 g / 54 g = 12.6% nitrite to nitrate...
826 Ppm nitrate in meat X 0.126 (12.6% ratio) = 104 Ppm nitrite in pumped meat..

Salt "appears" to be about 85% +/- with ~15% remaining ingredients... and at a 1% addition rate, you would still, probably, want to add about 1-1.5% salt, depending on recipe....

At $4.75 per pound, I'm not going to order it... I can make my own using cure#2 and salt etc. for about $2.50 per pound...
 

daveomak

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I'm gonna take a guess here....
FREEZE-EM PICKLE was developed around 1900 as a controlled method for curing meat, in place of using pure Salt Petre (er).... potassium nitrate...

It occurs in nature as a mineral, niter. It is a source of nitrogen, from which it derives its name. Potassium nitrate is one of several nitrogen-containing compounds collectively referred to as saltpeter or saltpetre.

Major uses of potassium nitrate are in fertilizers, tree stump removal, rocket propellants and fireworks. It is one of the major constituents of gunpowder (black powder).[6] In processed meats, potassium nitrate reacts with hemoglobin and generates a pink color.[7]

Meat processing
Potassium nitrate has been a common ingredient of salted meat since antiquity[27] or the Middle Ages[28]. The widespread adoption of nitrate use is more recent and is linked to the development of large-scale meat processing.[29] The use of potassium nitrate has been mostly discontinued because of slow and inconsistent results compared to sodium nitrite compounds such as "Prague powder" or pink "curing salt". Even so, potassium nitrate is still used in some food applications, such as salami, dry-cured ham, charcuterie, and (in some countries) in the brine used to make corned beef (sometimes together with sodium nitrite).[30] When used as a food additive in the European Union,[31] the compound is referred to as E252; it is also approved for use as a food additive in the United States[32] and Australia and New Zealand[33] (where it is listed under its INS number 252).[3]
 

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