Seasoning new smoker

Discussion in 'Charcoal Smokers' started by razorbackjack, Jan 6, 2016.

  1. razorbackjack

    razorbackjack Newbie

    Bought an Old Country Wrangler horizontal at Academy today. Looked at four different stores and found the one with the best welding job, a great seal and free of rust. Not all of the OC Wranglers are consistent so I had to check a few out. Anyway, I need to season the sucker before I do anything else. I noticed some sticky manufacturing gunk (?) in the bottom of the cook chamber. So, should I burn real hot to try and get rid of it BEFORE wiping with lard (or spraying Pam)? What I've heard more commonly is to lard or spray FIRST and then burn some wood. I've also heard some folks wash with water first, but I'm apprehensive as I am paranoid of rust. Any ideas on all this is GREATLY appreciated. Thanks much!
     
  2. valleypoboy

    valleypoboy Smoke Blower

    I'm far from an expert here, but I'd avoid Pam. Lard doesn't sound bad, but if you have it, some flaxseed oil is by far the best oil for "seasoning" cast iron so I'd think it would be best here too. When I got my ok joes, the inside was coated in oil already, though I have no idea what type.
     
  3. bbqwillie

    bbqwillie Smoking Fanatic

    I'm no expert either but I've always just used a good quality vegetable oil and a paint brush. Pour the oil in a bowl and paint everything on the inside, grates included. I do this while the fire is starting. Then I shut the door/lid once the fire is started and the heavy smoke has subsided. I leave the intake and exhaust wide open until I hit 200# and then I damp down the intake to hold between 200#-250#. I leave it like that until the fuel runs out. I consider it seasoned at that point.
     
  4. bill1

    bill1 Smoke Blower

    I wouldn't assume the "gunk" is food-grade anything but could be just about any cutting fluid or grease.  So first I'd wash good and then immediately coat with cooking oil and do your seasoning/heat treating.  You're not going to rust in the few minutes between washing and coating with a food-grade oil product.     
     

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