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Natural gas conversion - Cuisinart 3-in-1 5 burner grill

njusa31

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Joined Jul 5, 2020
Hi,
I am looking for suggestions around how to convert my Cuisinart 3-in-1 grill to natural gas. The manual is vague and recommends using Embers conversion kit if the grill supports dual fuel.

I bought a Embers conversion kit but when I opened up the grill flame nozzle, realized that the orifice doesn't come out using the orifice tool provided in the conversion kit. Has anyone got success with converting this grill to natural gas? Any tips?
 

daveomak

SMF Hall of Fame Pitmaster
OTBS Member
SMF Premier Member
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Joined Nov 12, 2010
Looking at the chart below, LPG has more pressure on that orifice because the LP gas is heavier than Natural gas...
If your LP burner has a #55 orifice it's about 19,000 BTU's.... If you leave the same orifice in the burner, using Natural Gas your burner will have 7,400-9,700 BTU's depending on the pressure...
I would use the same orifice that's in the burner AND install a needle valve between the pressure regulator and the burner to fine tune adjust the flame..... As you close down the needle valve and reduce the flow to the burner, the pressure drops at the orifice....
ALSO, if you cannot adjust the smoker as cool as you would like, plugging holes in the burner might get you there and that will allow for higher flames so you don't get a flame out....
You need more help with these thoughts, I'm here....
hover over my avatar and click on 'start conversation'...





Propane Burner adjustment.png


Burner BTU reductiion2.JPG







orifice sizes.png
 

njusa31

Newbie
4
0
Joined Jul 5, 2020
Each of the 5 burners are 9600 BTUs. Is it safe to let natural gas flow through the LP sized orifice? Would reducing the BTUs by 50% reduce the ability to grill meats?

Looking at the chart below, LPG has more pressure on that orifice because the LP gas is heavier than Natural gas...
If your LP burner has a #55 orifice it's about 19,000 BTU's.... If you leave the same orifice in the burner, using Natural Gas your burner will have 7,400-9,700 BTU's depending on the pressure...
I would use the same orifice that's in the burner AND install a needle valve between the pressure regulator and the burner to fine tune adjust the flame..... As you close down the needle valve and reduce the flow to the burner, the pressure drops at the orifice....
ALSO, if you cannot adjust the smoker as cool as you would like, plugging holes in the burner might get you there and that will allow for higher flames so you don't get a flame out....
You need more help with these thoughts, I'm here....
hover over my avatar and click on 'start conversation'...





View attachment 452618

View attachment 452619






View attachment 452617
 

njusa31

Newbie
4
0
Joined Jul 5, 2020
Each of the 5 burners are 9600 BTUs. Is it safe to let natural gas flow through the LP sized orifice? Would reducing the BTUs by 50% reduce the ability to grill meats?
I removed one of the orifice and it had a marking on it that said 1.02. Not sure what that means. Is it possible to buy orifices that have the right size hole for natural gas. Do they all have the same standard which would allow it to be threaded into the valve.
 

daveomak

SMF Hall of Fame Pitmaster
OTBS Member
SMF Premier Member
25,801
3,239
Joined Nov 12, 2010
Having a grill and a smoker don't work..... Smoking at 100-140F and grilling at 600-700F can't be done on the same unit.....
 

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