Hot knife into butter

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51Phantom

Fire Starter
Original poster
Apr 20, 2021
39
50
Toronto, Ontario CANADA
Hi guys. This is a bit of a stupid question. The term ”the meat is ready when the probe goes in like a hot knife in butter” I always thought that the probe goes into the meat with little to no resistance. Is this correct? When I do this I find the meat tends to be a bit dry. Am I wrong in my thinking?
I did a chuck roast last night that I took off the grill when I thought it was probe tender 205 degrees. It was good but a bit dry. Did I just leave it on a bit too long at 205 or am I wrong in my thinking of the Hot Knife into Butter term?
 
Hi guys. This is a bit of a stupid question. The term ”the meat is ready when the probe goes in like a hot knife in butter” I always thought that the probe goes into the meat with little to no resistance. Is this correct? When I do this I find the meat tends to be a bit dry. Am I wrong in my thinking?
I did a chuck roast last night that I took off the grill when I thought it was probe tender 205 degrees. It was good but a bit dry. Did I just leave it on a bit too long at 205 or am I wrong in my thinking of the Hot Knife into Butter term?
Chucks drying out is a common issue. I smoke mine until I get the color I want then finish them by braising in a pan covered with foil. You'll get better results that way
 
The other thing you can do is wrap it in foil at about 160 and finish it that way. Make sure the foil is sealed tight.
 
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The term 'like a hot knife through butter" is just an analogy so you can comprehend that the feel when probing will be very tender. In reality if a brisket was that tender you would have a hard time getting it off the pit without it falling apart, and it would be hard to slice.

There are better things to compare the tenderness of a brisket to. The feel of a properly baked or boiled potato is one thing most of us can relate to. A couple of better examples to determine 'probe tenderness' are room temperature peanut butter or a bowl of Jell-O. Take note of the resistance when going in, and pulling back out.
 
The term 'like a hot knife through butter" is just an analogy so you can comprehend that the feel when probing will be very tender. In reality if a brisket was that tender you would have a hard time getting it off the pit without it falling apart, and it would be hard to slice.

There are better things to compare the tenderness of a brisket to. The feel of a properly baked or boiled potato is one thing most of us can relate to. A couple of better examples to determine 'probe tenderness' are room temperature peanut butter or a bowl of Jell-O. Take note of the resistance when going in, and pulling back out.
Thanks. I like those examples.
 
Yes.. sounds like you need to calibrate a thermometer and stick with a trusted one... start probing/checking around 190`/195` ...
 
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