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First attempt at Bacon / Canadian Bacon

pops6927

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We always wet-brined our hams and bellies, and always left the skin on.  We would sell it both ways, rind on and rind off, many old timers liked to chew on the rind, same as cooking side pork or salt pork (sidepork is just fresh belly, sliced, salt pork is fresh belly cured but not smoked).  The skin does not impede the curing process at all; regardless if its wet or dry cure.  But, removing the skin is much, much easier after smoking than before smoking, esp. when done hot.  We'd wear rubber gloves and slide the knife under the skin progressively further in until it detached from half the belly, then flip it around and do the other side; skin removed.  You could get very close to the belly from the underside as the skin was hard and the fat soft, making it easy to remove. Sometimes on bellies that were close to the smokehouse wall that got overcooked you could just loosen the skin around the edge and pull the skin off with pliers.  Of course, always be careful, cutting away from you, not toward you; the meat knife could slip and slice through the skin and your fingers too.  
 

Bearcarver

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Will do, Packers Superbowl? 

One thing I have to say is that both of the bacons turned out to be more like a ham, the canadian bacon more so.  Is there something I did wrong?  Or is this just what homemade bacon tastes like?  The sweetness of the brown s ugar and apple wood definately came thru......maybe I am just ruined by mass produced bacon.....
M & B,

Canadian Bacon does taste pretty similar to a very lean ham, especially if you slice it & eat it cold. A little more smoke can help.

The Bacon shouldn't taste like ham.

I had that when I cold smoked a hunk of Bacon for about 8 hours.

In my opinion, when you cold smoke it, you have to do it much longer than you smoke it with some heat.

Nothing wrong with cold smoking--I just think it needs more smoking time than warm smoking needs.

I am basing this on having done some in nearly every temp from 70˚ to 160˚.

This is only my opinion, but my favorite Temp to smoke it in is a gradual rise from 110˚ to 140˚, and removing it when the internal tempo gets to be about 115˚ to 125˚, with a real nice dark reddish brown color.

Try all kinds of ways, and find what YOU like the best. While you're doing that, I doubt that you'll find ANY that aren't better than what you can buy in a store.

Bear
 

cowgirl

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We always wet-brined our hams and bellies, and always left the skin on.  We would sell it both ways, rind on and rind off, many old timers liked to chew on the rind, same as cooking side pork or salt pork (sidepork is just fresh belly, sliced, salt pork is fresh belly cured but not smoked).  The skin does not impede the curing process at all; regardless if its wet or dry cure.  But, removing the skin is much, much easier after smoking than before smoking, esp. when done hot.  We'd wear rubber gloves and slide the knife under the skin progressively further in until it detached from half the belly, then flip it around and do the other side; skin removed.  You could get very close to the belly from the underside as the skin was hard and the fat soft, making it easy to remove. Sometimes on bellies that were close to the smokehouse wall that got overcooked you could just loosen the skin around the edge and pull the skin off with pliers.  Of course, always be careful, cutting away from you, not toward you; the meat knife could slip and slice through the skin and your fingers too.  
Good post Pops!
 

meatnbeer

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We always wet-brined our hams and bellies, and always left the skin on.  We would sell it both ways, rind on and rind off, many old timers liked to chew on the rind, same as cooking side pork or salt pork (sidepork is just fresh belly, sliced, salt pork is fresh belly cured but not smoked).  The skin does not impede the curing process at all; regardless if its wet or dry cure.  But, removing the skin is much, much easier after smoking than before smoking, esp. when done hot.  We'd wear rubber gloves and slide the knife under the skin progressively further in until it detached from half the belly, then flip it around and do the other side; skin removed.  You could get very close to the belly from the underside as the skin was hard and the fat soft, making it easy to remove. Sometimes on bellies that were close to the smokehouse wall that got overcooked you could just loosen the skin around the edge and pull the skin off with pliers.  Of course, always be careful, cutting away from you, not toward you; the meat knife could slip and slice through the skin and your fingers too.  

 But does the rind impeed the smoke on that side of the bacon?
 

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