Cabinet Smoker Build: Take 2 (Long, Lotsa Pics, Good Info)

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Hey tx smoker, I'm planning out building a vertical brick smoker and poring through the smoker build threads to figure out what kind of design I want to go with. I was originally thinking of going with an offset firebox, but I got enough feedback saying it would take an offset brick smoker a long time to get up to temperature, so I'm leaning toward a vertical build. I like the look and concept of yours here, you did an amazing job with it!

Do you find that you get a pretty even temperature through the whole cooking chamber? I've also been looking into this kind of vertical reverse flow concept:
View attachment 660343
It looks like, instead of having channels to carry the smoke and heat all the way up the sides and then pull them down through the cooking chamber with a chimney opening at the bottom, you just put two open channels between the firebox and the cooking chamber, and then have a chimney at the top. Could you share why you went with this method after trying your original method, and instead of the one pictured above? I really like the simplicity of your design compared to this other one, and I'm leaning toward take it the way you did, but I'm curious to hear your reasoning. Thanks!
Robert started this thread but also a good way to let him know you have a question ( or any member of this site) use the @ symbol and start typing their name, no spaces and a drop down box will pop up and you can click on their name. So tx smoker tx smoker will show his name also will tag him and give him an alert.

Ryan
 
Thank you for the kind words regarding the smoker build.
Do you find that you get a pretty even temperature through the whole cooking chamber?
As was noted in the thread, I now have perfectly balanced temps top to bottom and front to back. This is due to the placement of the chimney on the top and drawing evenly from all 4 directions.
I've also been looking into this kind of vertical reverse flow concept:
Sorry. Hate to be the bearer of bad news but I see no way in the world that's going to work. It defies all logic and all laws of physics. There is no way the cook chamber is miraculously going to divide itself into 3 sections, 2 with heat and smoke going down then making a beautifully planned and executed 180 degree turn at the bottom and going back up the center of the smoker. Somebody just had fun drawing cute little lines on a picture of that smoker :emoji_laughing: Think about it...when was the last time you saw smoke or heat go down? I would guess the answer would be never because it goes totally against all laws of physics: heat rises, not falls. There is no way to get the heat to drop from top to bottom and as already noted, the cook chamber is going to be pretty consistent with air flow so the concept of 3 sections as are drawn is most likely a farce. I'm not an expert on smoker building but I see no way this is gonna work.
Could you share why you went with this method after trying your original method, and instead of the one pictured above?
I've already addressed the rationale behind not going with the one in your picture: because it's most likely not gonna work and would potentially be a huge waste of time. As for why I went the direction I did, well I honestly don't have an answer for that. I'd never even seen a cabinet smoker before building one so I had no baseline to work off of. First one was built on a wish and a prayer. It didn't work very well so I made adjustments on the second one based on what I'd learned, and the 2nd one works like a dream. I actually have mental plans for another one I'm considering building. If you're close to Texas I'll make you a great deal on this one :emoji_wink:

Robert
 
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Hey tx smoker, I'm planning out building a vertical brick smoker and poring through the smoker build threads to figure out what kind of design I want to go with. I was originally thinking of going with an offset firebox, but I got enough feedback saying it would take an offset brick smoker a long time to get up to temperature, so I'm leaning toward a vertical build. I like the look and concept of yours here, you did an amazing job with it!

Do you find that you get a pretty even temperature through the whole cooking chamber? I've also been looking into this kind of vertical reverse flow concept:
View attachment 660343
It looks like, instead of having channels to carry the smoke and heat all the way up the sides and then pull them down through the cooking chamber with a chimney opening at the bottom, you just put two open channels between the firebox and the cooking chamber, and then have a chimney at the top. Could you share why you went with this method after trying your original method, and instead of the one pictured above? I really like the simplicity of your design compared to this other one, and I'm leaning toward take it the way you did, but I'm curious to hear your reasoning. Thanks!
Hi there. I have a reverse flow cabinet, similar to the one in your post..I love it so far . It's a T&K brand..Check them out online..
 
tx smoker tx smoker thanks for the reply, I appreciate it. For the record, the picture I posted is, in fact, a legitimate smoker design, and daveomak daveomak has detailed a similar build style throughout this forum. You can see it being shown here and here as well. It does not defy the law of physics, it just uses an air tight seal to create a vacuum, and the smoke has nowhere else to go but down to the bottom and through the chimney, causing it to get pulled evenly through the smoking chamber. So, no bad news to bear, it turns out. I am just trying to decide if I want to go that route, or try a style more like yours. It seems a little dismissive to comment on "drawing cute little lines" and "a huge waste of time" about something you do not appear to be familiar with.

At any rate, thank you for giving insight into the perspective behind your build.
 
It seems a little dismissive to comment on "drawing cute little lines" and "a huge waste of time" about something you do not appear to be familiar with.
I will take that as constructive criticism and extend an apology. Looking at that picture you posted, I just could not see how in the world it'd work, but I'll take your word for it. You are correct in that I was/am not familiar with the design but i will say this: if it comes from Dave, you can take it to the bank :emoji_wink:

Robert
 
I will take that as constructive criticism and extend an apology. Looking at that picture you posted, I just could not see how in the world it'd work, but I'll take your word for it. You are correct in that I was/am not familiar with the design but i will say this: if it comes from Dave, you can take it to the bank :emoji_wink:

Robert
Fair enough! I could have been more clear in describing the picture, I failed to realize that not everyone would be familiar with that kind of setup, so that was my bad. I really appreciate your responses and this forum in general, I'm getting a much better idea of what I want to build, and it's so awesome people like you are making these great detailed posts!
 
Looks great, like every thing else you do it's first class , lot of blood sweat and thought went into that build, you will have a lot more builds I foresee lmao, the build it bug has bit you hard lol.
 
Just note that the "S" flow cabinet is a coal burner only, it is based or builds on a pressurized system with the coal burn forcing the exhaust because of the thermodynamic flow currents. These cabinets are often controlled by a PID and fan and therefor became a forced air system. The do work very well but are usually only low as slow cookers and don't do well at roasting temps...... The cabinets that reach roasting temps usually look like Roberts or stumps or a clone.... IE a much hirer coal burn rate and therefore a flow path with less friction and flow directional flow because of the need for a higher breathing fire..... I will further note that Roberts design will also do very well at low and slow......
 
Just note that the "S" flow cabinet is a coal burner only, it is based or builds on a pressurized system with the coal burn forcing the exhaust because of the thermodynamic flow currents. These cabinets are often controlled by a PID and fan and therefor became a forced air system. The do work very well but are usually only low as slow cookers and don't do well at roasting temps...... The cabinets that reach roasting temps usually look like Roberts or stumps or a clone.... IE a much hirer coal burn rate and therefore a flow path with less friction and flow directional flow because of the need for a higher breathing fire..... I will further note that Roberts design will also do very well at low and slow......
That is extremely helpful and makes my decision a lot easier, thank you for clarifying that point!
 
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