Brining turkey

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BrotherVinnie

Newbie
Original poster
Nov 15, 2022
3
1
Do you recommend to still brine a Butterball turkey that is frozen in a brining solution, after it’s thawed out? I’ll be smoking on my offset smoker, spatchcock style
 

noboundaries

Legendary Pitmaster
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SMF Premier Member
Sep 7, 2013
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Roseville, CA, a suburb of Sacramento
To answer your question, yes, thaw the bird then brine.

I throw the still shrink-wrapped bird in a water filled cooler to thaw it. Usually takes 18-24 hours to thaw; half that time if you change the water every hour or so. I don't bother changing the water to thaw.

Then I unwrap the thawed bird, clean out the cavities, dump the thaw water, clean the cooler, put the bird back in the cooler, and add the cold brine to the cooler. Don't over-salt. With poultry brine, more is NOT better.

Enjoy your bird!
 

Marknmd

Meat Mopper
Jun 22, 2022
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222
I've seen every recommendation under the sun.

I've seen people say don't brine a turkey because you'll dilute the wonderful natural flavor of the turkey. I think that was Kenji (he suggests dry brine). Chef Judy Rodgers (credited with inventing the dry brine technique) also suggests dry brine. Chef Jacques Pépin also doesn't brine his Thanksgiving turkey.

I've seen people say brine the turkey because the flavor of plain turkey is too mild - almost bland - and needs enhancement.

I've seen people say don't brine a butterball because it's already brined.

I've seen people say brine whatever you got and it'll be better.

I think people are going to recommend what has worked well for them in the past.

I personally don't wet brine, I usually do dry brine, and I'm very happy with all my smoked turkeys - 30+ years.

Good luck
 
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BrotherVinnie

Newbie
Original poster
Thread starter
Nov 15, 2022
3
1
I've seen every recommendation under the sun.

I've seen people say don't brine a turkey because you'll dilute the wonderful natural flavor of the turkey. I think that was Kenji (he suggests dry brine). Chef Judy Rodgers (credited with inventing the dry brine technique) also suggests dry brine. Chef Jacques Pépin also doesn't brine his Thanksgiving turkey.

I've seen people say brine the turkey because the flavor of plain turkey is too mild - almost bland - and needs enhancement.

I've seen people say don't brine a butterball because it's already brined.

I've seen people say brine whatever you got and it'll be better.

I think people are going to do what has worked well for them in the past.

I personally don't brine and I'm very happy with all my smoked turkeys - 30+ years.

Good luck
Thanks for your input, I appreciate it.
 
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Inscrutable

Master of the Pit
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Apr 4, 2019
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NC
I’ve done it several ways.
At this point, I always spatchcock, usually dry-brine, and usually either mix rub in with the salt or inject something.
 
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