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Reheating baby backs. What have you done that works?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I don't want to do this but it looks like I have to. Been asked to do a wedding for 200. Only doing meats. Pulled pork and ribs. Weird thing is dinner is served at !;30 in the afternoon. The actual reception is at a banquet hall elsewhere. The wedding and dinner is at the brides parents home. Due to the early dinner time I'm thinking I will need to do half the ribs the night before. I'm thinking somewhere around 40 racks.

 

So I'm looking for a tried and true method for reheating ribs. A method someone has actually had experience with that works. I will be using roasting pans for reheating.

My first inclination is to cook,cool, and then fridge overnight and reheat at 200 in roasting pan with some apple juice.

Is it just that simple? I'm anal about food quality at my cooking events. Anything short of coming off the smoker and eating

worries me. Especially with ribs.

post #2 of 6

I vacuum seal then put the bag in hot water to reheat. Other than the bark they are as good as the moment they were smoked.

Happy smoken.

David

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by themule69 View Post
 

I vacuum seal then put the bag in hot water to reheat. Other than the bark they are as good as the moment they were smoked.

Happy smoken.

David


Certainly sounds like it would work but that's a lot $$ in vacuum bags for 40 + racks of ribs. I'm guessing my other option is to start the smoker at 3am and then put the first batch of ribs in pans covered in foil and then in the insulated food transporters for a couple hours and then in the roasters shortly before serving. 

 

I like the vacuum bag idea for smaller cooks though.

post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3montes View Post
 


Certainly sounds like it would work but that's a lot $$ in vacuum bags for 40 + racks of ribs. I'm guessing my other option is to start the smoker at 3am and then put the first batch of ribs in pans covered in foil and then in the insulated food transporters for a couple hours and then in the roasters shortly before serving. 

 

I like the vacuum bag idea for smaller cooks though.

yea that's why I bought a chamber vacuum sealer. The bags are a lot cheaper.

Hope it all goes well/ Remember to post a Qview.

Happy smoken.

David

post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by themule69 View Post
 

yea that's why I bought a chamber vacuum sealer. The bags are a lot cheaper.

Hope it all goes well/ Remember to post a Qview.

Happy smoken.

David

 

 

 

 

for 40 racks warming with water is ideal.

 

 

However if you cant do the bags, and have access to an oven, just reheat (covered) unfoil 10 minutes in the oven before placing on the serving table.

post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Just thought I would update this and let you know what I did and how things turned out. I cooked 15 racks of pork loin ribs the night before the wedding. I prepared them just slightly under cooked. I did not cut the slabs but left them whole. Put them in full size steam table pans and covered them in foil. I did put a bit of apple juice in the bottom of the pans.
I boiled some water in a pan. Poured the boiling water in a steam table pan located in the bottom of my Carlisle food transporter. Basically preheating the transporter. I then put the pans of ribs in the preheated transporter. Closed the door and let them set overnight.
Next morning about 5am I put the transporter in the back of the truck and headed out to the wedding site with the smoker in tow. I should mention I opened the door on the Carlisle just long enough to get the pan of water out of the bottom but never peeked at the ribs. I had no idea at this point how the ribs held overnight. It was about 7pm when they were put in the Carlisle the night before.
Got to the wedding site and started to set up. Started the fire in the smoker, set up the roasting pans in the buffet line and started getting the pulled pork warm. The smoker was heated and ready for the next round of 15 racks of more ribs. Now it's about 8am and I still hadn't opened the Carlisle. I figured if they were ruined there's nothing I'm going to do about it now. Dinner was to be served about 1 or 1:30 that afternoon so about 10 I decided to open up the Carlisle and see what I was dealing with.
 
I was amazed to find they were still very warm. I took one pan out at a time and started cutting slabs into thirds or fourths and putting the pieces in the roasting pan to stay warm until dinner. My biggest fear was I was going to dealing with rib mush and would just wind up throwing it in with the pulled pork.
 
These held up very well. I was very pleased. I kept a close eye as people were digging in the roasting pan and every serving came out intact without falling apart even after being in the roaster several more hours. So it worked out better than I expected.
 
Lots of compliments on the food and sounds like I will get 2 more cooking gigs out of that one. Served about 150 on about 40lbs of pulled pork (actual sandwich meat) and 30 racks of ribs. Just enough left overs for the family to keep.  
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