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Salami

Rmonge00rya

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Hello! First post here. I have been curing my own salami and I have a few questions. My first cure seemed like it was going well, I checked the ph and it looked like it fermented well and it was starting to harden for the first few weeks, but then it softened up and it’s been sitting there soft for like 4 months. Is there any saving it? Should I move it to a new spot or should I toss it? Thanks!!
 

indaswamp

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Hello! First post here. I have been curing my own salami and I have a few questions. My first cure seemed like it was going well, I checked the ph and it looked like it fermented well and it was starting to harden for the first few weeks, but then it softened up and it’s been sitting there soft for like 4 months. Is there any saving it? Should I move it to a new spot or should I toss it? Thanks!!
Need more info....
What was the temperature, humidity, and air speed conditions in the drying chamber? Or did you use a drying chamber?
 

Rmonge00rya

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No drying chamber. I just hung them in my garage. The temperature probably ranged between 50-60 degrees for the first months and now that its hot probably between 55-75 degrees for the last few weeks. The humidity has been between 65 and 80 percent.
 

indaswamp

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The salami more than likely has case hardening which stopped the diffusion of moisture from the center which is why your salami is still soft in the middle. Cut one open and smell it, if it is bad you will know. To attempt to save it, you will have to remove the casing and vacuum seal the salamis then put them in your refrigerator to allow the moisture to equalize, this will soften the outer edge bringing moisture to the surface from the center. Then you can seal in umai bags and return to refrigerator.
 

pc farmer

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75 degrees??? That's not good for the meat. I agree, casehardning.
 

indaswamp

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Also, pictures would help...
Is your salami covered in white beneficial mold? The mold will help moderate moisture loss and help keep the casing moist.
 

indaswamp

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pc farmer is right... anything over 60*F allows for the growth of staphylococcus aureus. And this bug can handle Aw down to 86...
 

Rmonge00rya

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It was probably between 40 and 60 for the first 3 months it was curing. And no it never developed white mold. I probably should have bought a white mold starter and spread it on eh? The hardened casing is interesting- never thought of that... I did a chorizo and ate that already- it was drier in the outside and a bit crumbly and moist on the inside, tasted good though. I wonder if that’s what happened there as well. What are the ideal temperatures to cure? Here are some pictures: 1st one is the salami in question, second is another salami that is hardening, but slower. Thanks so much for taking the time to help!!
 

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