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Paint inside of smoker advice

Trash panda

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Hey guys and girls,

I have painted the inside and the outside of my smoker with red oxide primer.

my question is if I only paint the outside of the smoker with black heat proof paint and leave the inside red oxide will it be safe. I plan to smoke at 120.

I am thinking of burning the inside for three hours to kill any chemicals and hoping this would be safe.

Any advice is really appreciate.

kind regards
Terry
 

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tropics

Epic Pitmaster
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I googled red oxide paint

Is red oxide paint dangerous?
Toxic to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment. Repeated exposure may cause skin dryness or cracking. Vapours may cause drowsiness and dizziness. Other Hazards In use, may form flammable / explosive vapour-air mixture.

I would burn it off and wire brush it back to steel, your smoke will give it a coating
Richie
 

Millberry

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I read this----" red oxide primer is highly flammable and should be used with caution. It must be kept a safe distance away from possible flame sources such as a grill, fireplace or cigarette. It is also hazardous if breathed in, so proper ventilation of working areas is necessary."
BUT--It can be used on fire surround---so maybe I read it wrong. What if you put 2 coats of high heat paint and then have a "burn-off" at the highest temperature you can reach? Anyway--that's what I woud do (but--that don't make it right) We use to re-paint prefabricated fireplace inserts with high heat black paint--no problems at all

Rust-Oleum Specialty
12 oz. High Heat Satin Bar-B-Que Black Spray Paint

  • High heat spray paint resists temperatures up to 1200°F
  • Tough protective enamel offers excellent color retention
  • Covers up to 8 sq. ft. per can for indoor or outdoor use
 
Last edited:

SecondHandSmoker

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Normally, you don't paint the inside of a smoker and just coat it with vegetable oil.
The first time you build a fire in your firebox, the paint is history.
But don't you think that bad stuff is now going to end up in the cook chamber along with your food?

If it were me, I'd burn that hsit ( sic...on purpose) out of there and hit it hard with a wire wheel.
 

Trash panda

Newbie
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Joined Nov 30, 2020
I googled red oxide paint

Is red oxide paint dangerous?
Toxic to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment. Repeated exposure may cause skin dryness or cracking. Vapours may cause drowsiness and dizziness. Other Hazards In use, may form flammable / explosive vapour-air mixture.

I would burn it off and wire brush it back to steel, your smoke will give it a coating
Richie
Thanks buddy I appreciate the advice.
 

Trash panda

Newbie
6
1
Joined Nov 30, 2020
I read this----" red oxide primer is highly flammable and should be used with caution. It must be kept a safe distance away from possible flame sources such as a grill, fireplace or cigarette. It is also hazardous if breathed in, so proper ventilation of working areas is necessary."
BUT--It can be used on fire surround---so maybe I read it wrong. What if you put 2 coats of high heat paint and then have a "burn-off" at the highest temperature you can reach? Anyway--that's what I woud do (but--that don't make it right) We use to re-paint prefabricated fireplace inserts with high heat black paint--no problems at all

Rust-Oleum Specialty
12 oz. High Heat Satin Bar-B-Que Black Spray Paint

  • High heat spray paint resists temperatures up to 1200°F
  • Tough protective enamel offers excellent color retention
  • Covers up to 8 sq. ft. per can for indoor or outdoor use
Thanks mate, I have high heat black paint but I’m starting to think about stripping it back and polishing it up.
 

Trash panda

Newbie
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1
Joined Nov 30, 2020
Normally, you don't paint the inside of a smoker and just coat it with vegetable oil.
The first time you build a fire in your firebox, the paint is history.
But don't you think that bad stuff is now going to end up in the cook chamber along with your food?

If it were me, I'd burn that hsit ( sic...on purpose) out of there and hit it hard with a wire wheel.
Yes I think you are correct I will do this tomoz :)
 

jcam222

Master of the Pit
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I am no builder but I believe most leave it bare metal and you are to season with heat and oil.
 

bill1

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Joined Apr 25, 2015
I only somewhat agree with most of the respondents. I prefer steel or iron fireboxes be left unfinished on the inside (clean well and spray with cooking oil every couple cooks) as well but even the pro builders paint the outside. Many (Smoke Daddy comes to mind) paint the inside of their cook chambers and certainly the outside.

The flammability warnings being quoted are applying to paint as aerosol coming from a sprayer or rattle can. Part of drying/curing is the volatiles (that are the flammable part) outgas away. Fully dried paint is less flammable than meat. I suggest you get (or make) a small grate for your firebox to hold the fuel/charcoal a couple inches off the bottom--the fire burns better with air entering that way. Plus that may even keep your primer/paint from peeling that way. I certainly wouldn't try to remove what you have already. However with that said, I'd do at least a couple "burn-ins" before committing food to it. I think you can trust your nose. If it doesn't smell like fresh paint, even at temperature, it's safe to use. First cook can be a package of hot dogs. You won't be out much.

And btw, I've never seen such a sheen from primer. I think it looks great as is. And you and your dog are quite photogenic too. Keep posting.
 

Trash panda

Newbie
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1
Joined Nov 30, 2020
Yes I think you are correct I will do this tomoz :)
I am no builder but I believe most leave it bare metal and you are to season with heat and oil.
It does seem so, I will Indeed take the inside back to bare.
I only somewhat agree with most of the respondents. I prefer steel or iron fireboxes be left unfinished on the inside (clean well and spray with cooking oil every couple cooks) as well but even the pro builders paint the outside. Many (Smoke Daddy comes to mind) paint the inside of their cook chambers and certainly the outside.

The flammability warnings being quoted are applying to paint as aerosol coming from a sprayer or rattle can. Part of drying/curing is the volatiles (that are the flammable part) outgas away. Fully dried paint is less flammable than meat. I suggest you get (or make) a small grate for your firebox to hold the fuel/charcoal a couple inches off the bottom--the fire burns better with air entering that way. Plus that may even keep your primer/paint from peeling that way. I certainly wouldn't try to remove what you have already. However with that said, I'd do at least a couple "burn-ins" before committing food to it. I think you can trust your nose. If it doesn't smell like fresh paint, even at temperature, it's safe to use. First cook can be a package of hot dogs. You won't be out much.

And btw, I've never seen such a sheen from primer. I think it looks great as is. And you and your dog are quite photogenic too. Keep posting.
Hi Bill, thanks for the feedback, I originally planned to finish it with the 600c no nonsense black paint to seal the primer, now however I have fallen in love with the cherry red so my plan is to seal it with black tomorrow and buy another high heat spray in cherry red for the future.

In regards to the paint inside I will take it back to the steel after a few burns unfortunately as I really don’t want to ruin my brisket.

Im not sure if it would be safe with the primer but I’m not going to look past the fine advise of more seasoned smokers here so I’ll follow there tips.

Cheers Terry
 

Fueling Around

Master of the Pit
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Most primers must be top coated to prevent corrosion (rusting) of the base metal.

Any paint on the upper surface of the fire box will burn off with your first cook.
The transition to cook chamber will also burn off
 

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