How Long to Cook Brisket Or Misconception of the 1 to 1.5 hours per pound rule

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Smoking is Fun, don't get stressed, it takes time so don't try to rush it.
After a while it becomes second nature and you don't even think about it much.
Today I'm cooking for my neighbors (some of them) the ones I didn't get the last time.
3 pork butts and 2 big ole yard birds. Fun, fun, fun Also made some BBQ sauce to go along with it,

Gary
 
Smoking is Fun, don't get stressed, it takes time so don't try to rush it.
After a while it becomes second nature and you don't even think about it much.
Today I'm cooking for my neighbors (some of them) the ones I didn't get the last time.
3 pork butts and 2 big ole yard birds. Fun, fun, fun Also made some BBQ sauce to go along with it,

Gary


Lucky Neighbors!!!
Like.

Bear
 
Pork Butts and Chickens were a big hit, even got a big kiss on the Cheek

Gary
 
I'm actually gonna be doing my first brisket on Saturday. Starting my smoker at bout 4am. Got me a 22inch rocky mountain smoker. I've never been a brisket fan to me it's always been dry but I figured I'd give it a shot. I got it all spices up already in my fridge. now I gotta dig in my trash n see how much it weights I forgot to look lmao I know I paid 65 bucks at walmart for it. N I've been doing alot of reading recently since this is my first time. N none of the stuff I read mentioned wrapping or spritzing. How important is it to so this?
I appreciate any feedback. Thanks :-)
Btw this was very well written n thought out I appreciate it!!!
 
I smoked my first brisket over Memorial Day weekend with a little guidance from a friend who has smoked quite a few. I injected (I used beef broth and bourbon) and rubbed it a few hours before starting the cook. I cooked fat side up at 225 (I use a WSM with a Thermoworks Signals and Billows) and left it alone for the first three hours before checking to see if it needed any spritzing (basic apple juice/cider vinegar mix), then I checked every hour and spritzed as needed. I had probes in the point and flat, but I wrapped based more on feel/bark quality. It was around 160 when I wrapped with butcher paper, and it took about another 6 hours after that to get to 205 on my Thermapen. Rested for about 2 hours. I think I could have gotten the fat to render some more, and the bark got a little washed out in one spot where juices pooled up on top, but I was pretty happy with the results, especially for my first attempt.


IMG_1342.jpg IMG_1344.jpg IMG_1345.PNG
 
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I've got some reading to do. How do you gauge time so that your start early enough for dinner?


What ever you come up with start it much earlier, because you can hold it for many hours, by wrapping in towels in a cooler, which is better than sitting around for hours waiting for it to be done.

Bear
 
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Depending on the size, type of smoker, and other factors, usually, it takes time to get a well-cooked however a medium cooked can be done within no time.
 
Can you make please more posts like this? !!

There is a post similar to this on just about anything you can smoke. Just ask or use the search function and you will be able to find what your looking for. Heck, some folks have them listed in their signatures.

Chris
 
It has been a long time since I posted this, we have a lot of
Newbies and Folks Confused and Scared of Briskets
This should help and useful



How Long to Cook Brisket
Or

Misconception of the 1 to 1.5 hours per pound rule



This is not just my opinion, but facts gathered from various sources. One has Ph.D. in Physics from Harvard University, Texas A &M Agrilife Research & Animal Science, Texas A & M Rosenthal Meats Center and Teach Meat Science, Department of Animal Science, and TAMU BBQ group.

Also, my observations of forty years of smoking.




I am not trying to step on anyone’s toe’s or create a problem, just trying to help first time smokers in their journey to smoking a great brisket

In general thickness is a better predictor than weight.

Imagine you had one 20” long, 10” wide, 3” thick brisket. Weighs 20 lbs, and takes 30 hours to cook. But now imagine you cut in half, and separated it by an eighth of an inch. Would it take 30 hours to cook, or 15 hrs now that each half weighs 10 lbs? In fact, the cooking time only depends on the brisket thickness, not its weight. A 30” long or a 10” long brisket that is the same thickness takes the same amount of time to cook.

Similarly, a 6” diameter pork but that is 12” long cooks in the same time a 6” diameter 18” long butt.

So if you typically cook a 12lb brisket in 12 hours, and you bought an 18 pounder but really it is just longer and about as thick after trimming, the cooking time might only jump from 12 to 13 hours.....

Another example, Say you are grilling steaks, you have two pieces of meat, both weigh one pound but one is an inch thick and the other is two inches thick, you are cooking both to medium rare, they both weigh a pound, but which one will get to medium rare the quickest.

That is why so many people new to smoking have their briskest turn out dry, tough, over or under cooked, because they are going strictly by time. After you have cooked several briskets and are familiar with your smoker it is a lot easier to judge when your brisket is done. A thermometer is a valuable tool. Check your brisket at different intervals and when you think it is getting close.

Also Smoking temperature is one of the key factors, people smoke anywhere from 200° to 300° so how can your cooking time be based on weight, simply put it can’t. The one hour per pound rule is a good starting point, but don’t base your entire cook on weight alone.

So to summarize, when picking a brisket take note of the size differences a 16 pound brisket is going to be bigger all around, a little thicker, wider and longer than a 12 pounder, so take that into consideration when choosing and smoking a brisket. I wouldn’t automatically add 6 more hours for the 18 pounder, but look at how much thicker it actually is and use your good judgment.

I know smoking a brisket for the first time seems complicated for some, but keep it simple watch your temp and keep an eye on your brisket and you will be fine. I guess it’s easy for me to say since I’ve been smoking for over 40 years.

There is so much information available at your finger tips, that wasn’t there when I started. I had a lot of trial and errors; ask a lot of questions at different BBQ joints and friends who smoked. I also kept a notebook which I would refer to until I got comfortable enough not to need it any more. When I switched to a reverse flow (which I use now) it took a few smokes to get to know my new smoker and figure out the adjustments. I have smoked so much on it I know when to check it to add wood or more charcoal, how much to start with and how quickly it comes up to temp.

No two briskets are exactly the same, let’s say for example you estimate 1 to 1.5 hours per pound. A 12 pound brisket can be done in 12 hours during one smoke and the same size brisket takes 18 hours the next time. Why? There are many factors that contribute to the difference; type and breed, diet, age of the animal, amount of exercise, feed, etc. All these determine the density of the muscle and the amount of fat marbling. Type of equipment, experience level, temperature, and weather all play a part in how long it will take.

Good briskets take time, but the time varies so how do you know when it’s done ?

There are several methods you can use. One way especially for the beginner is use a thermometer. (Most briskets that are dry and tough were not cooked long enough)

Most briskets will be done around 190° to 205°. Now if you buy” Choice or Prime grade” it can be tender and juicy around 180° to 185°.

Beef needs to rest after it is cooked so the juices can redistribute before cutting. A brisket should rest at least 30 minutes and up to 2 to 4 hours in a warm ice chest.

Using the 1 to 1.5 hour rule and your brisket is around 12 pounds, a cooking time of between 12 and 18 hours depending on the above mentioned factors. A lot of cooks use the toothpick test, when the toothpick slides in like butter with no resistance its ready. Another method mostly by experienced cooks and have a lot of briskets under their belts, is looks and feel, a good bark and kind of soft and pliable.

I am hoping this helps and not confuses anyone, Smoking a brisket is not rocket science or that had, but you need to pay attention to the basics and you will have great brisket.






Brisket Texas Style

This is how I Smoke my Briskets



I usually buy my briskets at Sam’s; so far they have been very consistent in quality.
I try to find a “Choice” grade full packer with not too much fat and pliable, but not limp or stiff and around 12 pounds or so.

I do not inject or rub the day or night before. Not saying it is wrong, I just don’t do it.

The morning I am going to smoke (early) I get my brisket out of the fridge while I am getting my smoker fired up.

Take the brisket out of the Cryovac rinse it off and trim the fat cap down to about a ¼ inch.

Rub it down with olive oil and coat it with Course ground black pepper and salt, that’s it. (I have my

S & P already mixed in a shaker
) Once my smoker is running at 225° I put it on. (Note: I will let my smoker get to 250° - 275° at first, so by the time I get the brisket on and the door closed it drops down to the 225° I’m looking for) I use a combination of charcoal and wood, hickory, pecan or oak, mainly because that’s what is available. I use Charcoal to get things going then add splits.

I let it smoke for about 6 hours, or until I am happy with the bark, then pull it and wrap in butcher pape. (I do spritz a few times prior to wrapping) either with just plain apple juice or 50/50 apple juice and apple cider vinegar, then back on the smoker till done usually another 6 plus hours. I then take it off wrap in a couple old towels and stick it in a warm cooler for an hour or so. (Before I wrap in the towels, I do unwrap the butcher paper a bit and take a look to make sure I am happy).

Pull it out, unwrap and slice. I always have a great bark and smoke ring, moist and tender. I like butcher paper because it will hold in some moisture and let it form a very good bark.

I did foil in the past, up until about 6 or 7 years ago and switched to BP. Sometimes I don’t wrap at all, but found I prefer the BP method.

I have used different rubs, injected and tried lots of different techniques over the years, but have settled on this one because my wife, kids, grandkids, friends and neighbors and me all like the flavor and texture. To me it brings out that real brisket/meat flavor. I am not saying this is the right or only way, just a very good way.




Gary
Good post. brisket drives my wife crazy. "when' it going to be done?" "when it hits 202 honey" you'll have plenty of time to cook the other shit while it rests. also love to take an "enhancment session" during the stall (but that's just me.
 
It's geometry

The use of weight to estimate cooking times works nicely if and when your hunk of food is sufficiently spherical. Thus, a turkey, a chicken, or a shoulder are appropriate for the weight estimator. This is because, for a sphere of even density, weight is a good (cube root) estimator of thickness from any direction.

On the other hand, when you've got a flat food, like a brisket or ribs, then, as has been noticed, thickness would be a better estimator, since it's more closely related to any point in the center than is any other measurement. Since it's not a perfect estimator, you'll get burnt ends, but I have always considered burnt ends to be a happy child of circumstance.
 
It has been a long time since I posted this, we have a lot of
Newbies and Folks Confused and Scared of Briskets
This should help and useful



How Long to Cook Brisket
Or

Misconception of the 1 to 1.5 hours per pound rule



This is not just my opinion, but facts gathered from various sources. One has Ph.D. in Physics from Harvard University, Texas A &M Agrilife Research & Animal Science, Texas A & M Rosenthal Meats Center and Teach Meat Science, Department of Animal Science, and TAMU BBQ group.

Also, my observations of forty years of smoking.




I am not trying to step on anyone’s toe’s or create a problem, just trying to help first time smokers in their journey to smoking a great brisket

In general thickness is a better predictor than weight.

Imagine you had one 20” long, 10” wide, 3” thick brisket. Weighs 20 lbs, and takes 30 hours to cook. But now imagine you cut in half, and separated it by an eighth of an inch. Would it take 30 hours to cook, or 15 hrs now that each half weighs 10 lbs? In fact, the cooking time only depends on the brisket thickness, not its weight. A 30” long or a 10” long brisket that is the same thickness takes the same amount of time to cook.

Similarly, a 6” diameter pork but that is 12” long cooks in the same time a 6” diameter 18” long butt.

So if you typically cook a 12lb brisket in 12 hours, and you bought an 18 pounder but really it is just longer and about as thick after trimming, the cooking time might only jump from 12 to 13 hours.....

Another example, Say you are grilling steaks, you have two pieces of meat, both weigh one pound but one is an inch thick and the other is two inches thick, you are cooking both to medium rare, they both weigh a pound, but which one will get to medium rare the quickest.

That is why so many people new to smoking have their briskest turn out dry, tough, over or under cooked, because they are going strictly by time. After you have cooked several briskets and are familiar with your smoker it is a lot easier to judge when your brisket is done. A thermometer is a valuable tool. Check your brisket at different intervals and when you think it is getting close.

Also Smoking temperature is one of the key factors, people smoke anywhere from 200° to 300° so how can your cooking time be based on weight, simply put it can’t. The one hour per pound rule is a good starting point, but don’t base your entire cook on weight alone.

So to summarize, when picking a brisket take note of the size differences a 16 pound brisket is going to be bigger all around, a little thicker, wider and longer than a 12 pounder, so take that into consideration when choosing and smoking a brisket. I wouldn’t automatically add 6 more hours for the 18 pounder, but look at how much thicker it actually is and use your good judgment.

I know smoking a brisket for the first time seems complicated for some, but keep it simple watch your temp and keep an eye on your brisket and you will be fine. I guess it’s easy for me to say since I’ve been smoking for over 40 years.

There is so much information available at your finger tips, that wasn’t there when I started. I had a lot of trial and errors; ask a lot of questions at different BBQ joints and friends who smoked. I also kept a notebook which I would refer to until I got comfortable enough not to need it any more. When I switched to a reverse flow (which I use now) it took a few smokes to get to know my new smoker and figure out the adjustments. I have smoked so much on it I know when to check it to add wood or more charcoal, how much to start with and how quickly it comes up to temp.

No two briskets are exactly the same, let’s say for example you estimate 1 to 1.5 hours per pound. A 12 pound brisket can be done in 12 hours during one smoke and the same size brisket takes 18 hours the next time. Why? There are many factors that contribute to the difference; type and breed, diet, age of the animal, amount of exercise, feed, etc. All these determine the density of the muscle and the amount of fat marbling. Type of equipment, experience level, temperature, and weather all play a part in how long it will take.

Good briskets take time, but the time varies so how do you know when it’s done ?

There are several methods you can use. One way especially for the beginner is use a thermometer. (Most briskets that are dry and tough were not cooked long enough)

Most briskets will be done around 190° to 205°. Now if you buy” Choice or Prime grade” it can be tender and juicy around 180° to 185°.

Beef needs to rest after it is cooked so the juices can redistribute before cutting. A brisket should rest at least 30 minutes and up to 2 to 4 hours in a warm ice chest.

Using the 1 to 1.5 hour rule and your brisket is around 12 pounds, a cooking time of between 12 and 18 hours depending on the above mentioned factors. A lot of cooks use the toothpick test, when the toothpick slides in like butter with no resistance its ready. Another method mostly by experienced cooks and have a lot of briskets under their belts, is looks and feel, a good bark and kind of soft and pliable.

I am hoping this helps and not confuses anyone, Smoking a brisket is not rocket science or that had, but you need to pay attention to the basics and you will have great brisket.






Brisket Texas Style

This is how I Smoke my Briskets



I usually buy my briskets at Sam’s; so far they have been very consistent in quality.
I try to find a “Choice” grade full packer with not too much fat and pliable, but not limp or stiff and around 12 pounds or so.

I do not inject or rub the day or night before. Not saying it is wrong, I just don’t do it.

The morning I am going to smoke (early) I get my brisket out of the fridge while I am getting my smoker fired up.

Take the brisket out of the Cryovac rinse it off and trim the fat cap down to about a ¼ inch.

Rub it down with olive oil and coat it with Course ground black pepper and salt, that’s it. (I have my

S & P already mixed in a shaker
) Once my smoker is running at 225° I put it on. (Note: I will let my smoker get to 250° - 275° at first, so by the time I get the brisket on and the door closed it drops down to the 225° I’m looking for) I use a combination of charcoal and wood, hickory, pecan or oak, mainly because that’s what is available. I use Charcoal to get things going then add splits.

I let it smoke for about 6 hours, or until I am happy with the bark, then pull it and wrap in butcher pape. (I do spritz a few times prior to wrapping) either with just plain apple juice or 50/50 apple juice and apple cider vinegar, then back on the smoker till done usually another 6 plus hours. I then take it off wrap in a couple old towels and stick it in a warm cooler for an hour or so. (Before I wrap in the towels, I do unwrap the butcher paper a bit and take a look to make sure I am happy).

Pull it out, unwrap and slice. I always have a great bark and smoke ring, moist and tender. I like butcher paper because it will hold in some moisture and let it form a very good bark.

I did foil in the past, up until about 6 or 7 years ago and switched to BP. Sometimes I don’t wrap at all, but found I prefer the BP method.

I have used different rubs, injected and tried lots of different techniques over the years, but have settled on this one because my wife, kids, grandkids, friends and neighbors and me all like the flavor and texture. To me it brings out that real brisket/meat flavor. I am not saying this is the right or only way, just a very good way.




Gary
Good post. Thanks. I bought a Snake River Wagyu black brisket that I'm putting on the Campo Chef tonight. I''m scared sh*tless that I'm going to screw it up, so would appreciate your take on what I've planned. Eat at 6PM tomorrow (Saturday). Remove it from frig at 7:30PM tonight. Place temp probe in intersection of point and flat. Put on 225F smoker at 10PM until temp is around 160F+. Wrap until temp is about 200F+. Let it rest for 3 hours. Instead of resting, I've been toying with leaving it in the smoker at 160F for the 3 hours. Your thoughts on this would be apreciated. Thanks.
 
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