How do you chop your firewood down to the Karubecue C60 size brick or redbull can size? Axe recommen

Discussion in 'Wood Smokers' started by superthinjerky, Aug 17, 2017.

  1. How do you chop your firewood down to the Karubecue C60 size brick or redbull can size?  What kind of Axe is best?  I have the recommended Black and Decker Alligator Loppers.  But I need input on how to chop this Red Oak Firewood I have, I'd like to split with an axe these already split pieces of red oak, as seen in the stack picture, so that they can all be ready for the Black and Decker Alligator Lopper .  I purchased a 8 Lb Husky Splitting Maul but it barely puts a ding in the red oak let alone even get close to splitting it.  I mostly use the alligator lopper and sometimes I must use a larger electric chainsaw for the larger pieces of red oak.  If I can only find an Axe or method to split the pieces of red oak then they would be all easily processed by the alligator lopper.  Any suggestions?





     
  2. i6quer

    i6quer Fire Starter SMF Premier Member

    Ever looked at the kindling cracker?

    How do you like your Karubecue? I've read the Amazing Ribs review a couple of times, seems like a very unique design to get really clean smoke. Share some pics sometime if you get a chance!
     
  3. glocksrock

    glocksrock Smoking Fanatic

    I use a Fiskars splitting axe, the biggest one, and a sliding compound mitre saw from Harbor Freight to cut my splits down to size for my Lang 48, it works very well. I only use Hickory, which may not be as hard as oak, but it still works well on seasoned splits.
     
  4. Are you using a chopping block or just on the ground?
     
  5. smokedcaveman

    smokedcaveman Smoke Blower

    I second on the kindling cracker - easy to do at the end of the day when you're tired and don't want to wind up overstriking, understriking, or picking up your toes and putting them in a cup of ice to go to the ER.
     
  6. yankee2bbq

    yankee2bbq Meat Mopper

    I was going to ask the same question about if the firewood is placed on the ground or splitting block. When I did not have my hydraulic splitter I place my logs on a splitting block. My splitting block was a tree stump. It makes a difference. Just sitting on the ground absorbs the impact.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2017
  7. browneyesvictim

    browneyesvictim Smoking Fanatic ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    Since getting a Fiskars X27 I don't use my big heavy maul much anymore. If its real knotty or twisted I set it aside and use a hydraulic splitter.
     
  8. Rings Я Us

    Rings Я Us Master of the Pit Group Lead

    So I can use 1/4 splits in my ECB if they are 12 inches... But how do you shorten splits from 18 or whatever to 12 inches? Lol🤔 I'm not sure how big splits are.. must be 16" or more. The wood stoves need shorter ones also I would think.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2017
  9. yankee2bbq

    yankee2bbq Meat Mopper

    16" is standard for wood stoves (or firewood in general).
    I use my saw-zaw or even my chain saw to shorten lengths in all ready split firewood.
     
  10. I6Quer

    -Ever looked at the kindling cracker?

    Never heard of it but after watching some youtube vids it looks like a great product.  Only concern I have is if the kindling cracker blade is perhaps to thick and it can't dig into the wood.  That seems to be the problem I am having with the Husky Maul Axe.  I do not have a stump to put the wood on.  I've tried chopping it on the dirt ground, and I've tried chopping it on the patio's concrete slab.  Maybe the split wood needs to be on a stump before I chop it?  But if so why isn't the maul axe biting into it even more when I try to chop it on concrete?

    -How do you like your Karubecue? I've read the Amazing Ribs review a couple of times, seems like a very unique design to get really clean smoke. Share some pics sometime if you get a chance!

    I really enjoy the Karubecue and I'm glad I purchased it instead of a green egg.  I love how much space I have inside the KBQ.  Once the heat wave/ fire season started here in the LA County / Ventura County area I haven't used it because of the wood splitting issue.  Also if I'm going to use the Karubecue during the fire season I must go around and remove any dead leaves brush etc.  5 days ago the heat wave died down so I'm preparing to start back up again and develop a better kindle creating method.  Right now I just chainsaw the wood, and with how thick the wood is it would be ideal if I could split those already split pieces one more time to get them a bit thinner.  I don't have any new pics at the moment but I should once the kindling issue is solved.  I don't think its that easy to get hickory out here.  Red & White Oak firewood is the most available type of woods in this area.

    glocksrock

    -I use a Fiskars splitting axe, the biggest one, and a sliding compound mitre saw from Harbor Freight to cut my splits down to size for my Lang 48, it works very well. I only use Hickory, which may not be as hard as oak, but it still works well on seasoned splits.

    I wish now looking back that I got the Fiskar Axe.  I think the Husky Maul Axe's blade is too wide and it can't wedge itself into the wood.  Do you think this is the reason why I'm not able to split the red oak firewood, or is it due to the surface that the wood is resting on?  I like the sliding compound meter saw better than the chainsaw because you create less wood chips and sawdust because the sliding compound mitre saw's blade is thinner than the chainsaw's.

    wimpy69

    -Are you using a chopping block or just on the ground?

    I tried on the dirt ground, and on the concrete patio slab.

    SmokedCaveman
    -I second on the kindling cracker - easy to do at the end of the day when you're tired and don't want to wind up overstriking, understriking, or picking up your toes and putting them in a cup of ice to go to the ER.

    Thank you for this feedback.  The more I think about it the kindling cracker is a lot safer than an axe for sure.  

    yankee2bbq

    What is strange is that putting the wood on concrete didn't allow the axe to bite into it anymore than on the dirt.  I guess I will ask the guy I bought the firewood off of if he has a stump for sale.

    -Browneyesvictim

    I will keep the hydraulic splitter in mind, but I hope I can get this kindling created with either a chopping block, or a different splitting device.
     

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