or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ribs help

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

So I am ready to try some ribs, but I accidentally bought two different cuts. I have two packages of back ribs at about 3 lbs each and one package of spare ribs which is about 6.5 lbs. I want to have them both ready for dinner tomorrow. Should I start the larger cut earlier? About how much time will they all take. I know I need to cook to temperature, but I need to estimate my start time. Thanks!

post #2 of 12
How are you planning to smoke them? (Foiled, unfoiled, etc.) typically, for me, spare tend to take about an hour longer than back ribs. If your plan is, say a 3-2-1, than go with that for the spares. After an hour, put the back ribs on for a 2-2-1. At the end of the day, though, cook the meat! Look for a good pull back from the bone and a good bend in slab. Good luck and happy smokin'

Lance
post #3 of 12

Yep...With or without foil, start the Spares 1 hour ahead then add the BBacks...JJ

post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeW999 View Post
 

So I am ready to try some ribs, but I accidentally bought two different cuts. I have two packages of back ribs at about 3 lbs each and one package of spare ribs which is about 6.5 lbs. I want to have them both ready for dinner tomorrow. Should I start the larger cut earlier? About how much time will they all take. I know I need to cook to temperature, but I need to estimate my start time. Thanks!


Don't cook ribs to temp. Hard to get a good read on them with all the bone mass. I do the bend test and it's never failed me. Meal pull back on the bone doesn't always tell the story either. I've had ribs that were done perfectly with little noticeable pull back and I've had ribs done perfectly that pulled back nearly a full inch,. :confused:

 

The bend test is a no fail. When they are nearing done pick the rib up from one end with a tongs slid half the length of the rib. If it bends and just slightly cracks the surface of the meat you are at the sweet spot. If it nearly breaks in half you are overcooked.

 

Of course if you are foiling you can't do the bend test while they are in foil. Part of the reason I stopped foiling my ribs years ago. They can overcook quickly wrapped in foil.

post #5 of 12

Everybody has their own way of testing the doneness of ribs.

I prefer to test them by temp. You need a good instant read therm, like a thermapen.

But I get the same results every time by checking the IT.

And there is a growing number of people doing it this way.

 

Al

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys. I will Get the spares in early and work from there. I'm thinking 225 for the lot. Is that about right?

post #7 of 12
Sounds good!
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

One more quick question. Water in the pan or no?

post #9 of 12
What are you smoking on?
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 


MES 40

post #11 of 12
Personal preference I think. I used it in the WSM for temp control but in an MES I don't know if it really matters.

Lance
post #12 of 12

No water in the MES. It just slows things down and contributes little...JJ

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pork