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The piece of Brisket I cut off from a few smokes ago. - Page 2

post #21 of 25

Oh, that will be good , if you keep your lid shut. Build up the Bark and soak-up the smoke. It'll be great. and will fall apart like this ;

 


Good smoking and  . . .

post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by bruno994 View Post
 

As far as being dry, there are several factors that contribute to that.  First of all, you were cooking the just the flat section as others have mentioned, this area will typically be more dry due to less internal fat marbling.  The flat is a lean cut even with a choice or prime grade piece of beef.  Most of us cooking competition will always take our turn in slices from high off the flat section, as close as we can get to the point as possible, due to the higher amount of fat content.  The second major factor to a dry flat section is as I mentioned above, the grade of beef that you bought.  The higher the grade, the better the chance of a moist flat section due to (once again), internal marbling and fat content.  I cook quite a few briskets during the year and have cooked every grade from selects all the way up to CAB Prime, if the brisket does not have the internal fat, it doesn't matter what you do, it's going to be dry.  I cook briskets to toothpick tender every time, no probes, no worrying about IT's, just 4 hours smoke, wrap them up in a pan with some beef broth or reserve au jus from a previous cook, then start checking them with toothpicks around the 3 1/2 hour mark after being wrapped.  My toothpick test, is with little to no resistance...slides in easily.

 

Thanks for the tip's.  I had wondered if the quality of the brisket had caused the dryness.  (It wasn't popcorn dry, just a little drier than I had hoped).  I was pretty diligent about checking doneness by sticking a probe in it.

post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by One eyed Jack View Post
 

 

Thanks for the tip's.  I had wondered if the quality of the brisket had caused the dryness.  (It wasn't popcorn dry, just a little drier than I had hoped).  I was pretty diligent about checking doneness by sticking a probe in it.

 

 

Here's the thing though, lots of BBQ shacks use select briskets yet they manage to turn out tender and moist products.  Even the ones that radically trim off all the surface fat.     I think there is something else going on here other than the grade of the meat.

post #24 of 25

True, there are a lot of little BBQ restaurants turning out quality product using good ol' USDA Select grade beef, the secret is that each one has found a method that works best for their setup, their pit, and their customer volume.  Whether that be wrapping with aluminum foil or butcher paper, or no wrap at all, slow and low or hot and fast.  It's the same process that we all have to do as well, find what works best for your pit, your taste and your desired tenderness.  When I mentioned grade of beef is a big factor, which it is, I was not saying you couldn't get a moist product out of a Select, I have and will continue to do so, I was just pointing out that you stand a better chance of a moist end product with a higher grade than you do with a lower grade.  Now tenderness, that's your own fault, I have never had a brisket that I couldn't make tender as long as you put heat to it for long enough time. It will eventually break down and give it up producing a tender product, you just might have to add some sauce or drink a lot of sweet tea to wash it down...Over the years I have cooked many Select grade briskets right next to each other on my pit, using the exact same process through the entire cook and more often than not, there is always one that turns out a bit moister than the other, this comes from the internal fat marbling...if all other factors are the same, then it comes down to the quality of the meat. Remember that the actual briskets aren't graded, the carcass is graded between the 7th and 8th rib (if I remember right) a Select brisket has come off a carcass that graded Select, which means you could actually end up buying a Select grade brisket that has Choice grade marbling and vice versa. I would also add, that if you get the chance, try wet aging a brisket one day, just buy you one a month ahead of when you think you might cook one, place it in a secondary fridge, still in the original packaging and let it sit there for 28 days. Then either cook it that weekend following the 28 days or stick it in the freezer until you need it. Much better results in my humble opinion. 

post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by bruno994 View Post

 

True, there are a lot of little BBQ restaurants turning out quality product using good ol' USDA Select grade beef, the secret is that each one has found a method that works best for their setup, their pit, and their customer volume.  Whether that be wrapping with aluminum foil or butcher paper, or no wrap at all, slow and low or hot and fast.  It's the same process that we all have to do as well, find what works best for your pit, your taste and your desired tenderness.  When I mentioned grade of beef is a big factor, which it is, I was not saying you couldn't get a moist product out of a Select, I have and will continue to do so, I was just pointing out that you stand a better chance of a moist end product with a higher grade than you do with a lower grade.  Now tenderness, that's your own fault, I have never had a brisket that I couldn't make tender as long as you put heat to it for long enough time. It will eventually break down and give it up producing a tender product, you just might have to add some sauce or drink a lot of sweet tea to wash it down...Over the years I have cooked many Select grade briskets right next to each other on my pit, using the exact same process through the entire cook and more often than not, there is always one that turns out a bit moister than the other, this comes from the internal fat marbling...if all other factors are the same, then it comes down to the quality of the meat. Remember that the actual briskets aren't graded, the carcass is graded between the 7th and 8th rib (if I remember right) a Select brisket has come off a carcass that graded Select, which means you could actually end up buying a Select grade brisket that has Choice grade marbling and vice versa. I would also add, that if you get the chance, try wet aging a brisket one day, just buy you one a month ahead of when you think you might cook one, place it in a secondary fridge, still in the original packaging and let it sit there for 28 days. Then either cook it that weekend following the 28 days or stick it in the freezer until you need it. Much better results in my humble opinion. 

 

 

Hey Bruno,

 

Thanks again for your further insight's.  I have limited access to brisket, at least whole packers), around here.  My first and only brisket so far, was a choice from wally-world.  I had read about aging on another forum, and as luck would have it weather and family obligations delayed my first smoke date and so the brisket did age in it's cryopac for several weeks.

 

I smoked it at 225* to 250* on my Char Griller Akorn to an IT of about 170*,  wrapped in butchers paper, and at 190* IT started checking with my Thermapen as a probe.  I have probed a fair number of Chuck roast's,  (Smoking for pulling), and figured that I had a decent touch for probe tender.  All that is behind my disappointment in the dryness but it is my first and only brisket so far.  It's about time to get another and try it again.

 

 

 

 

 

Cubed point was really almost too good.  Can't believe it's not illegal.

 

 

 

 

 

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