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Time To Try A Brisket

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone,

 

Well this summer has flown by and I haven't gotten a chance to smoke anything good for a long time.  Having a little party this Saturday and decided it was about time I tried a brisket on my Lil Tex Traeger Elite.  This is the first time doing a brisket so I had a few questions or wondered if anyone had any better suggestions for me.  I have been searching and searching this site and have already gotten most of my questions answered.

 

I will be doing a 12-14lb brisket.  I plan on cooking it low and slow around 200-220 degrees.  Not sure on the wood to use.  Probably mesquite or hickory.  Might mix in some apple as well.  Since this is my first brisket I was going to do a very simple dry rub.  Probably 50/50 kosher salt and course black pepper. 

 

So from a suggestion of a friend I plan to cook the brisket to an internal temp of 170.  Then I will foil it with liquid and put it back on the smoker.  He uses an au jus mix.  Not sure if I need to really do this???  But if I have the time I might. 

 

Then once I get an internal temp of 190 I'm going to wrap it in foil/towels and let rest in a cooler for a couple hours.  I'm hoping that it will turn out good and moist.

 

I think my biggest question has to do with the Maverick ET-73 thermometer I got and have never used.  How do I place the thermometer probe?  Do I put in through the side to the thickest part of the brisket or through the top?  With the other probe can I place it on the grate right next to brisket for a good chamber reading? 

 

I would love to hear any other suggestions if you have them.  I will try to make a post on my first experience with some Q view. 

 

Thank you!!!

post #2 of 9

Hi,

 

I am new but I have been reading a lot about... well everything I can.  lol

 

One thing I was very interested in was the Maverick ET-733.  Mine finally came in the mail yesterday. WOOO HOOO!

 

Regarding the probe to give the temp of the CC I read from someone that you can put the probe through a potato and place the potato on the grate.  I don't think you want to probe to touch the metal grate.  As for where to insert the probe for the meat I think either choice is good.  Just don't move it once you insert it.  In other words don't remove it and stick it numerous other places during the cook.  Leave it once it's in.  Otherwise constant poking will let wonderful juices pour out of your brisket and you don't want that.

 

My biggest question when using the Maverick ET-733 is the probe cord.  How are we supposed to close the door once the probes are in the CC?  I am afraid of crushing the cords.  Pleas let me know if you hear anything about that.  Is it safe to just close the door on the cord?  I am very curious to hear peoples suggestions about that.

 

Please document you Smoke here in it's own thread with plenty of pictures.  Good luck.

post #3 of 9

Phil

 200° -220° is going to be to low. Kick it up to 230°-250° You can go to 275° if you don't have any sugar in your rub. I like 230° with lots of smoke. You can drop your probes down the top vent and place one in the brisket at the thickest point. I would go threw the top as to not have a hole in the side of my foil. (I don't foil) Then the potato works well.

Happy smoken.

David

post #4 of 9
I put the probe in the flat (thanks, bearcarver!). Even though the point is thicker, it cooks faster due to all of the fat.
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by huskerphil View Post
 

So from a suggestion of a friend I plan to cook the brisket to an internal temp of 170.  Then I will foil it with liquid and put it back on the smoker.  He uses an au jus mix.  Not sure if I need to really do this???  But if I have the time I might. 

 

 

This saves time. If you're going to foil, I recommend doing it around 160 as you start to enter the stall. The stall is caused by evaporative cooling, and when you wrap the brisket you stop evaporation, so you minimize the stall. Much quicker brisket.

 

Whether or not you choose to wrap is up to you. It can help keep the brisket moist, but you won't get that nice bark. Generally for me if I'm working with a good well-marbled Prime brisket, I won't foil it. The fat keeps it moist. If I'm using a lesser cut of brisket, I'll foil.

post #6 of 9

WRT the Maverick probe, I haven't quite identified exactly where the temp sensor is on it.   So, I locate the thickest part of the flat and then I stick my probe in from the side.   My reasoning is that there's more room for error.

 

That said, I'd suggest that you not cook the brisket to a predetermined temp, but rather, cook it until it's done.  Do the probe test on it starting at about 190.   Take your probe and start poking around the thickest part of the flat.   When it goes in and out like a knife through room temp butter, the brisket is ready to be pulled, wrapped and rested.

 

The reason for this is that some briskets might be ready at 190, yet other briskets aren't ready until they reach 200, or 205.   But, ALL briskets are ready when they pass the probe test.

post #7 of 9

Trending now is 203 IT degrees for brisket. However, the poke test can give it a reality check. Some people poke it with a toothpick to check if it's done, feels like poking into room temp butter. Hard to do in foil. If you smoke at 250 or above and go to 203 IT, I think the only foiling you'd need to do would be for the rest period. If you have to foil for time's sake, do it when it hits the stall. At that point, if you want to add au jus, pour it around, not on the meat and wrap the foil tightly around the brisket.

 

For Rob Sicc too:

As for the ET-733, it had a clip for the temp probe which holds it to the grate.

This is the only pic I have showing the temp probe on the grate, it's hard to see down at the bottom right.

 

I drilled a 1/4" hole in the side of the smoker just above grate level to pass the probes through. You want to know the smoker temp where the meat is, so place it near, but not touching the meat.

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grillmonkey View Post
 

Trending now is 203 IT degrees for brisket. However, the poke test can give it a reality check. Some people poke it with a toothpick to check if it's done, feels like poking into room temp butter. Hard to do in foil. If you smoke at 250 or above and go to 203 IT, I think the only foiling you'd need to do would be for the rest period. If you have to foil for time's sake, do it when it hits the stall. At that point, if you want to add au jus, pour it around, not on the meat and wrap the foil tightly around the brisket.

 

For Rob Sicc too:

As for the ET-733, it had a clip for the temp probe which holds it to the grate.

This is the only pic I have showing the temp probe on the grate, it's hard to see down at the bottom right.

 

I drilled a 1/4" hole in the side of the smoker just above grate level to pass the probes through. You want to know the smoker temp where the meat is, so place it near, but not touching the meat.

Thanks for the advice.  I have been thinking drilling a hole.  I may try going down the chimney first..  Either way these chickens look amazing.

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thank you everyone for the suggestions.  I can't wait to see the finished product.  Got the brisket rubbed and ready in the fridge.  Going in the smoker tonight!

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