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juniper berrys

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

not sure if this is the place to post  or not but since i see it called for in sausage recipes ill ask.

 

what does juniper berry taste like? what does it bring to the dish its added to? i am palnning on doing some bacon soon and wonder if this would be a good additive for flavor

post #2 of 6

It's the main flavoring in Gin. Sort of a citrus like flavor that kinda hits the taste buds in the back of your tongue. It's rather a unique flavor.

post #3 of 6
It is a main component in making pastrami too! They can be bitter. Right now in my neck of the woods it is harvest time. I will be going out this weekend and gathering what I want for the year.

One thing to mention is that they are a diuretic so eating in mass quantities is not a good idea.
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdboatbum View Post
 

It's the main flavoring in Gin. Sort of a citrus like flavor that kinda hits the taste buds in the back of your tongue. It's rather a unique flavor.

He's got the main description!

 

The mature, dark berries are usually but not exclusively used in cuisine, while gin is flavored with fully grown but immature green berries.

 

They are used in lots of wild game recipes to downplay any gaminess the meat may have.

 

The outer scales of the berries are relatively flavorless, so the berries are almost always at least lightly crushed before being used as a spice. They are used both fresh and dried, but their flavor and odor are at their strongest immediately after harvest and decline during drying and storage.

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 

thanks guys

post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokinHusker View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdboatbum View Post

 
It's the main flavoring in Gin. Sort of a citrus like flavor that kinda hits the taste buds in the back of your tongue. It's rather a unique flavor.
He's got the main description!

The mature, dark berries are usually but not exclusively used in cuisine, while gin
 is flavored with fully grown but immature green berries.

They are used in lots of wild game recipes to downplay any gaminess the meat may have.

The outer scales of the berries are relatively flavorless, so the berries are almost always at least lightly crushed before being used as a spice. They are used both fresh and dried, but their flavor and odor are at their strongest immediately after harvest and decline during drying and storage.
Excellent description! I feel like I either just ate a berry.. or did a shot of gin. biggrin.gif
> i always just say... "taste like a Christmas tree..." lol
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