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"Ugly Duckling" Dry Aged - Salt Crusted - Prime Rib Roast - Q/View - Page 4

post #61 of 73
Thanks Tom,
I acutally thought of the same thing when using it to melt ice! lol

I love crust, but I love learning new techniques even more. The local grocery chain has rib roasts for $6.99/lb right now, so I will be doing this in the near future for sure.

Do you use bone in roasts at all? How would the cooking method be different with bone-in vs. boneless?
post #62 of 73
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Humdinger View Post

Thanks Tom,

I love crust, but I love learning new techniques even more. The local grocery chain has rib roasts for $6.99/lb right now, so I will be doing this in the near future for sure.

Do you use bone in roasts at all? How would the cooking method be different with bone-in vs. boneless?

 

I like the bark on pork butts and burnt ends, but after taking the time to age a quality piece of meat, I want as much of the favorable meat as possible and this technique provides just that.

 

$6.99, good price.

 

After using bone in roast in the past it was found to be a pita.  After dry aging, the bones are carved away.  Just found it easier to use boneless. Why pay for the bone when it is going to be tossed or used for stock at the most although it does save carving the dried meat from one side.  Never tried salt crusting a fresh roast with the bone in.

 

Tom

post #63 of 73
Thread Starter 
 Why go to so much trouble for prime rib steaks?  Wanting to duplicate steaks that demanded high prices and were the ultimate in luxury and taste, like those served in the highest priced steakhouses for the privileged few.  Research showed these are steaks that are dry aged (minimum 30 day's), like those sold at Strassburgers in N.Y. City, not wet aged, which does little to improve the meat. 
 
 Unlike the prime rib steaks served in affordable steakhouses, I chose to dry age a choice boneless rib roast for 45 days, then take it a step further and cook it in a way that would produce a steak that had incredible beef flavor.  Although they can be good, I did not want one that was heavily smoked, seasoned, then drowned in a seasoned au jus, disguising the true beef flavor, this would involve salt crusting.
 
 Cooking the roast in a salt crust insulates the roast, producing one that is cooked gently and evenly with no overcooked meat around the edges, rare from center to the edges with plentiful juices, making au jus totally unnecessary. 
 
Tom
post #64 of 73

Wow!

 

Just that. No other words. WOW!

 

Thank you for the great post!

 

Cheers!

Ed

post #65 of 73
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward36 View Post
 

Wow!

 

Just that. No other words. WOW!

 

Thank you for the great post!

 

Cheers!

Ed

 

Thank you, I will take that as a compliment, Ed. 

 

Happy new year to you and all are Israeli friends.

 

Tom

post #66 of 73
This is an amazing thread, I will absolutely have to try this method ! Thanks so much for sharing this info Mr.T !

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beercheer.gif
post #67 of 73
Mr.T,
Great work (and creativity) on that rib.

I would like to try it.

How can one know how much to trim after aging? Go by colour change?

If aging in the "house" fridge is smells from other foods an issue (since the meat can't be covered ).

30 vs 45 days- is there a major yield difference?

Would a striploin roast work?

Thank you
post #68 of 73
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by atomicsmoke View Post

Mr.T,
Great work (and creativity) on that rib.

I would like to try it.

How can one know how much to trim after aging? Go by colour change?

If aging in the "house" fridge is smells from other foods an issue (since the meat can't be covered ).

30 vs 45 days- is there a major yield difference?

Would a striploin roast work?

Thank you

 

atomicsmoke,

Thank you. 

 

Trim down to fresh meat, there will be a color change as well as texture.

 

Your meat will pick up odors from surounding foods.  Best to have a designated cooler with plenty of air circulation.

 

The beef flavor will start to intensify after 21 days and becomes more pronounced as time passes.  As for yield between 30 vs 45 days, I would guess 10% difference.

 

I don't see why a strip loin would not work. 

 

Tom

post #69 of 73

So, let me get this straight. I can buy a roast, stick it in the fridge & leave it for 30-60 days, and I'm good to go?  Obviously trimming off the dried & funky bits before cutting it into steaks. Is that about right?

post #70 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by AK1 View Post

 Obviously trimming off the dried & funky bits before cutting it into steaks. Is that about right?
Naah...trimming is only for the faint of heart.

Kidding!

I can't wait to try this.
post #71 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by atomicsmoke View Post


Naah...trimming is only for the faint of heart.

Kidding!

I can't wait to try this.

I was gonna save the funky bits for jerky:439:

post #72 of 73

Thanks for sharing your excellent work.

post #73 of 73
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterinHoleBrew View Post

This is an amazing thread, I will absolutely have to try this method ! Thanks so much for sharing this info Mr.T !

points1.png

beercheer.gif


Thank you very much and you are welcome.

 

T

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by twoalpha View Post
 

Thanks for sharing your excellent work.


Thank you and you are welcome.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AK1 View Post
 

So, let me get this straight. I can buy a roast, stick it in the fridge & leave it for 30-60 days, and I'm good to go?  Obviously trimming off the dried & funky bits before cutting it into steaks. Is that about right?

Answers below.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by atomicsmoke View Post

Mr.T,
Great work (and creativity) on that rib.

I would like to try it.

How can one know how much to trim after aging? Go by colour change?

If aging in the "house" fridge is smells from other foods an issue (since the meat can't be covered ).

30 vs 45 days- is there a major yield difference?

Would a striploin roast work?

Thank you

 

Welcome adventurist.  If you are going give this method a try, let's go slow. We don't want to expect to win the "Indy 500" or the "Montreal  Grand Prix" before we get our drivers license. By doing this, you will then understand what each subtle change will make in the eventual end product.

 

 There are probably less than a handful of very high end steak houses that prepare their steaks this way.  If you are considering doing a salt crust to replicate the very high end steak houses, begin by salt crusting a fresh roast, size is not overly important here .  You will then understand what this cooking technique has on your product compared to other methods.

 

For comparison reasons, try a roast that has been wet aged two or three weeks also, you will then be able to distinguish and understand the difference between wet and dry aging. You will also notice the difference each change has on the beef taste or flavor, as other than a possible grind of pepper and a bit of smoke is all the seasoning needed in this process.  The whole idea of doing this is so we can enjoy the intensified and delectable flavor of beef alone.  Related thread:  Mr T's - Fresh - Salt Crusted - Prime Rib Roast - Q/View

 

It would be suggested, if you are planning on dry curing at home that you have a designated cooler for this purpose.  Dry aged products need to be on a rack and in an environment with good air circulation around the entire roast and away from products that may infuse their odor into your product.  Another and possibly preferred method would be, ask the butcher where you purchase your product if he would be willing to age it for you.  The advantage of this would be, the environment would be such that aging would be with the correct humidity and temperature control.  A little incentive ($) may be required here, but well worth it.

 

 When ready to start dry aging, begin aging for a period of  21 days.  By doing this you will observe the difference in tenderization of wet and dry aging.  The beef taste and aroma does not begin to intensify until after 21 days, but we want to fully understand this also. By starting this way you will have much less trimming to do.  My research explains that a total loss in weight of 40% is common, but you can expect a 21 day roast will be much less.

Keep good notes and consider in time doing you own thread along with keeping this thread up to date on your progress in hopes that others will be encouraged to pursue this method of cooking.

 

 Prepare yourselves for negative criticism of this method.  Considering most of the sources, I have learned to take it with a grain of salt (pun intended).

 

Tom

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