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post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

I know the owner of a Q joint here in town . she asked me would i pay $7 for a leg 1/4 and 3 sides? ( maybe 3oz per side)  I told her No. she got a lil upset w/ me.

  I explained that 1. i know what it cost to make. 2. I can make it as good if not better.

3. that i would rather sell 100 plates at $6 ea. than to sell 40 at $7 cause my prices were to high.

   I then told her to try it at $7 and see. If folks will pay it go for it.

  Was i wrong???

post #2 of 24

If she was asking for your opinion and you gave it, I don't see where you could go wrong Bob.

post #3 of 24

Don't you just hate it when asked your opinion and folks get upset............

post #4 of 24

I wouldn't pay that either. 

post #5 of 24

What Dave said!



post #6 of 24

I wouldn't pay it.  But, I wouldn't pay $5 or $6 for a "meal" deal of garbage at MacDonalds either.


It will be interesting to see how she does.  Most of these Q joints, with a very few exceptions, aren't around for long.


Good luck and good smoking.

post #7 of 24

Perhaps she should have asked someone who doesn't have or know how to use a smoker?


People without, will gladly pay $7, if it is better than they can make themselves.


That would not include members of this forum.  biggrin.gif






post #8 of 24

If you ask a question. You better expect an answer. Did she want you to lie to justify her pricing? 6 is better. 7 if she throws in a drink. Drinks are cheap anyway.

post #9 of 24

Would I pay it no not usually unless on the road but do I think others will pay it yes if she includes a soda or sweet tea maybe 7.50 or so. Have you been to the fast food restaurants lately their prices are crazy??

post #10 of 24

Well Bob   answers 1 and 2 put you at an advantage over so many other people.  


I wish I could pay 7 bucks for a meal like that at the Saints game or downtown.  Probably wouldn't touch it here in the subburbs if you dont have a nicely air conditioned seating area where I could get out of the heat for lunch and lots of free extras like ESPN on the widescreen and pretty waitresses that smile a lot.  Hooters gets 8 bucks for a hamburger!


7 bucks for lunch is only a buck or two higher then a burger meal.



post #11 of 24

I have not bought a Q meal in many years but I think that 7bucks now days is about normal. I would not pay it  because I don`t like leg 1/4 trs..I think you did right by your answer..

post #12 of 24

In Charlotte you can't get lunch for less than 8-9 bucks except maybe KFC or Wendy's.

post #13 of 24

If someone asks my opinion and then gets mad at an honest answer...I usually just laff and walk away.


I used to always wonder why a decent Q-sammie costs as much as it does.


Then I learned how to  make it.. now I know why.


 Have a great day..



post #14 of 24

Eh....going to hold my tounge on this one.

post #15 of 24

Leg quarter plates for 5 bucks! 


















Relax,  its a monkey.

post #16 of 24

Hard to say without having been there for the conversation. If she was asking your business advice with respect to pricing of her product and you said you would not pay it because you know what it costs to make and you can make better, that's not very useful feedback for a business person because it has nothing to do with the market and what it will support in your area.


Your point about volume and pricing is the crux of the matter and that is something she needs to figure out for herself. As noted, most BBQ joints are not around for long. Hell, only 15% of new restaurants survive the first year as it is. The variables that go into pricing are complex and so attached to location, style, quality, etc. that for her to ask the question as some sort of disembodied hypothetical is sort of pointless. Would people pay $7 for a quarter chicken and three sides? Of course they would if it was outstanding and the whole style and experience of eating there merited it. That is often like catching lightning in a bottle combined with lots of hard work.


Sounds like this Q joint is already up and running and she's asking about the pricing of a new product. If that is the case then the real question is, knowing her and her establishment, would you pay $7 for it from HER?

post #17 of 24

LOL Alblancher...it's a monkey.


I don't think you were wrong. I think it needed more clarification. LovinSpoonful is right too

in that...how good is it? Is it fresh? what sides? What's her reputation? I also agree that

Q joints today are getting outrageous...one of the reasons I got into smoking my own.


Every now and then I get a client and they ask me how do I get more business,well, I put it

right back to them...what are you doing for your current business? They then start to realize

that taking great care of current customers and making sure they're 110% happy with the

food, service, atmosphere and yes, cost, the rest is easy.


There's a place the wife and I go to at least 3-4 times a month. We're pampered, the food is

always fresh and prepared awesomely and we've yet to have a bad experience. I have personally

told over 20 people they need to get there and try it. Would I pay $8.50 for something I've been

paying $7.00 for a while for, you bet, without blinking...simple see...all the best...James

post #18 of 24

If it's good.....I would gladly pay whatever the price is.........however, if she is asking if she should charge $6 or $7 because of perception of whether it's too expensive or not she certainly won't last long......you have to figure your cost then set a constant level of mark-up to make a profit....and if she has to charge $6 bucks just to sell it but doesn't make a profit.....well then she has a nice hobby but not a business.  icon_rolleyes.gif

post #19 of 24

We had this arguement in Grad School.  How much should I charge for my product?  My answer was   How Much Can You Get For It?  The Q joint owner was angry because Eman didn't think her Q was worth 7 bucks.  Maybe he should have said  If you throw in a large fountain drink you can charge $ 7.50 was the best answer.  That way in her mind she was getting 7 dollars for her Q and still selling the fountain drink for more then cost.


I used to tell our salespeople an old joke.


One day a guy walked past a pet shop and saw a parrot in the window.  He went into the pet shop and found out the owner wanted $ 1,000.00 for the parrot.  The guy rolled his eyes and told the shop owner he was crazy, no one would ever buy that parrot for 1000 dollars.  Next week he passed by the shop and the parrot was gone, he kind of laughed and prodded the shop owner about selling the parrot.  No way you got 1000 dollars for that parrot he said.    Not really was the reply, but I traded 2 - 500 dollar chickens for it!   Never forget about perceived value.

post #20 of 24

Pricng is always a tough call. My family has been in the ice cream and candy business for 28 years, my wife's family for at least that long in the restaurant business, and I manage commercial properties loaded with restaurants. When you look at just the cost of the product it may sound high compared to what you can buy it for and make it at home. You need to add in all the other expenses associated with the end price. Insurance, mortgage or lease, utilities, labor, food cost, waste, cleaning supplies, etc. It adds up quick. I have eaten at some places where the prices seem too low too make it and most of those places have not. We have even had a few competitors try to open up and undercut us. They can only lose money for so long and then they have to close the doors. 

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