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Soaking?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I've read a lot of instructions on the curing process and pretty much all of em say to soak your bacon after curing for a couple hours. Why?

 

Is it to reduce saltiness?

post #2 of 11

Yes

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

I was gonna say.  I thought that was what it was

post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnum3672 View Post

I've read a lot of instructions on the curing process and pretty much all of em say to soak your bacon after curing for a couple hours. Why?

 

Is it to reduce saltiness?


You shouldn't have to soak it for a couple hours.

I soak mine for a half hour most of the time just to get the surface salt off.

Then I do a test fry, to see if it is too salty.

So far with using Tender Quick, I have never had to soak longer to get rid of salty taste.

The only time I ever soaked because of a salty taste was when I used Hi Mt Cure & Seasoning.

 

Bear

 

post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnum3672 View Post

I've read a lot of instructions on the curing process and pretty much all of em say to soak your bacon after curing for a couple hours. Why?

 

Is it to reduce saltiness?



I think your saying to soak the bacon for a few hours after the curing process..... sometimes you need to soak a few times with fresh water. But yes that's the norm. icon14.gif

post #6 of 11

The fry test is the key.  Bacon is salty by nature, but your taster determines how you like it.

 

I rinse mine carefully, then fry test.  With Tenderquick, I usually don't have to soak unless I let the curing process go too long.  I have more trouble with commercial corned beefs for pastrami.  I soak them pretty good.

 

Again, the fry test will give you a good guide.

 

Good luck and good smoking.

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Venture View Post

The fry test is the key.  Bacon is salty by nature, but your taster determines how you like it.

 

I rinse mine carefully, then fry test.  With Tenderquick, I usually don't have to soak unless I let the curing process go too long.  I have more trouble with commercial corned beefs for pastrami.  I soak them pretty good.

 

Again, the fry test will give you a good guide.

 

Good luck and good smoking.


Exacatically!  biggrin.gif

 

post #8 of 11

I brine cure the bacon here..

 

They come out of the brine after a week, rinsed, patted dry, covered with whatever I spicing with and into the fridge.

 

Craig

post #9 of 11

Dedicated fridge for brining.  Some people have all the luck, Craig!

 

Good luck and good smoking.

post #10 of 11

Grace your wife with the convenience of a modern, up-to-date appliance; cold, fresh drinking water from the front of the door, a selection of ice formats to enhance the quality of her beverages, more spaciousness for her to explore the fine points of her culinary skills, new, easy-to-clean surfaces, ... you can go on and on to the benefits of a new fridge.. as long as you find a spot out in the garage for the old one, you're in like flint!bluesbros.gif

post #11 of 11

A wise and experienced husband to give me guidance.

 

The purpose is to enhance her enjoyment of life rather than getting me a dedicated fridge.

 

Ingenious!

 

Good luck and good smoking.

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