How much smoke?

Discussion in 'Woods for Smoking' started by freshmeat, Oct 22, 2009.

  1. freshmeat

    freshmeat Smoke Blower

    Not sure which forum this belongs so will post here. Newbie here that has successfully knocked out boston butts, bb ribs, meatloaves, and fatties all based on internal meat temperatures.

    My question is, does a piece of meat reach a point where no further smoke is going to penetrate / enhance it...do you keep smoke rolling on all products till final temp is reached?

    I have used the 2-2-1 method on the bb ribs and understand that the time in foil will not deliver in any smoke flavor.

    I now know first couple of sessions I was delivering an overkill of smoke, more of a white billowy presence rather than the 'thin blue smoke'.

    I have yet to monitor my cooking chamber temps in order to compare the temp with smoke being produced vs. temp when no smoke is being produced. Are these / should these be different? (hehehe, while typing this guess I am doing some bb ribs this weekend and will chart temp of first 2 hours, stop smoke completely during 2 hour wrap and monitor.)

    Thanks for all the help and inspiration (on this and previous lurking).
     
  2. forluvofsmoke

    forluvofsmoke Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Hope this puts thing into better perspective...happy smokin'!

    Eric
     
  3. mballi3011

    mballi3011 Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Not sure which forum this belongs so will post here. Newbie here that has successfully knocked out boston butts, bb ribs, meatloaves, and fatties all based on internal meat temperatures.

    My question is, does a piece of meat reach a point where no further smoke is going to penetrate / enhance it...do you keep smoke rolling on all products till final temp is reached? As afr as I know your meat will always except the smoke flavor during the whole smoke.

    I have used the 2-2-1 method on the bb ribs and understand that the time in foil will not deliver in any smoke flavor. While you have the meat foile it will still get smoke flavor but just so little that you wont tell it.

    I now know first couple of sessions I was delivering an overkill of smoke, more of a white billowy presence rather than the 'thin blue smoke'.
    You don't want the billowing white smoke you want the thin blue that everyone here speak of. The white is a bitter and nasty tasting smoke. You want to barely be able to see the smoke and it will be the smoke you want. As long as you can smell it your smoking.
    I have yet to monitor my cooking chamber temps in order to compare the temp with smoke being produced vs. temp when no smoke is being produced. Are these / should these be different? (hehehe, while typing this guess I am doing some bb ribs this weekend and will chart temp of first 2 hours, stop smoke completely during 2 hour wrap and monitor.)
    if you smoke your ribs at 225 you foil them and put them back in at 225 you don't raise the temp. What you are doing is tanderising the meat or just breaking down the connective tissues and then when you take them out of the foil you are just stiffing them up so they don't fall apart when transfering them to the platter or plate.
    I hope that helped you with your up coming smokes.
     

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