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pvc for stack

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Ok I'm building a smoker out of a old freezer for smoking jerky at 150 to 160. would it be ok to use pvc for a smoke stack? I was thinking that it would be ok because of the low temp inside. Thanks
post #2 of 16
Would you stop into Roll Call nad intrduce yourself if you don't mind please. We like to give a nice big warm welcome to memebers. Now for your pvc question I don't think it would be any harm but I'm not a expert on it and I wouldn't use it till I found out for sure. It might be ok or it might be deadly too.
post #3 of 16
Just keeping at low temps might be ok. But I'm no expert on plastics. I did just read a thread about somebody that was using Saran Wrap on some stuff and cooking and there were thoughts that at higher temps the plastic breaks down and releases toxic chemicals. I'd also have some concern about the glue or whatever you're going to use to seal and attach it.

I'd just do some more research and/or wait for some more knowledgeable folks to stop in and sound off on this question.
post #4 of 16
I agree with mballi3011 , That is some pretty funky glue they use with PVC. A little heat may just get it giving off some funky chemicals.

Or it might be perfectly safe. Who knows?
post #5 of 16
PVC is commonly used for domestic water distibution systems, but the maximum service temperature for sched 40 pvc is 140*. Why not just use 4" single wall steel flue material?
post #6 of 16
YeaI would use 4" stovepipe Home Depot or lowes have it don't cost that much. That way if for some unforscene acyion wolud occour and your temps rise you won't have to worry about your pipe.
post #7 of 16
for safety and cost go with stovepipe.
post #8 of 16
I would not use PVC. Reason why, that was not its intented purpose. Why risk it. PDT_Armataz_01_03.gif
post #9 of 16
I've seen it use, but personally I try to keep plastic away from my smokers cause ever once in awhile we have a ragin inferno ta deal with!

Ya can get several sizes a metal pipe fer bout the same cost as the pvc an won't give ya the possible headaches.

Just my two coppers worth.
post #10 of 16
There is a lot of concern in using plastic in general. There are chemicals in there that build up over time and can be toxic. If you heat it up it could release those chemicals faster. Not sure really, and may not cause any problems, but I try to minimize as many toxins to the body as possible.
post #11 of 16
I'd recommend against PVC in favor of actual metal stovepipe, but not for the reasons already given. Smoking is an addiction, and like any other addiction the "user" builds up a tolerance for the same old dose of the same old drug and experiments with other drugs to get a better high. You're satisfied with jerky now, but sooner or later you're going to want to try sausage or a pork butt or a fattie or a brisket or ribs or... you get the idea. You might as well build your smoker capable of handling the higher temps needed for some of these other smokes.

Or you can plan on having more than one smoker. No law against that, either!
post #12 of 16
PVC vent pipe used in HVAC must only be used with a power exhaust system.
Really there is no advantage for a home built smoker in using PVC vent vs metal venting.
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
You guys have some very good points. I'm still looking for what I need.It will be metal pipe all the way.Thank you for your help.
post #14 of 16
I have had 12 years in the plastic film industry and I can assure you that most plastics (PVC included), will begin to release dioxins at around 150 degrees. Dioxin has been implicated in the onset of breast cancer as well as other illnesses. Please folks, keep the plastic away from heat. It's like waving around a loaded gun. It may never go off, but I sure don't want it pointed my way if it does.

For the vent mod, I used roof flashing. Be sure to use the stainless type and not galvanized. Just measure the diameter of your stack and cut the flashing a little longer. Roll it into a cylinder and insert it into the stack. You can then adjust it up and down to allow the grills to be removed. Remember to wear gloves when you play with it though. That stuff will bite you!
post #15 of 16
You might want to read about PVC pipe at this link and draw your own conclusion. If it was me don't think so.
post #16 of 16
No way on the PVC. I used it extensively in my fish ecology research and know that it doesn't take extremely hot temps to make it pliable. And as lots of others said, it gives off all sorts of nasties when exposed to heat.

Especially as you can probably find a workable metal pipe in a different isle at the same hardware store.
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