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Questions for smoking a turkey... - Page 2

post #21 of 39
I agree with Blackhawk. I also Googled the temps.
post #22 of 39
I GIVE UP..OK SO ALL OF YOU GET YOUR RECIPES FROM YAHOO ETC.. WHATEVER THE WEB TELLS YA.IM SORRY BUT I CANT DEAL WITH COOKIN ON A WEBSITE LIKE THIS...YAHOO DOESNT TELL ME HOW TO COOK RIBS OR CHICKEN.. I WENT THREW 4 YEARS OF COLLAGE TO LEARN PROPER METHODS. IM SO SORRY BUT I CANNOT FIND THE OPEN MIND HERE......GO ON COOK TO USDA STANDARDS..TO THE LETTER...GOOD LUCK . I CANT DEAL WITH THE USDA.....EVER THINK WHAT DO YOU WANT TO SERVE MINE OR USDA.. IM SURE YA CAN FIND 1000 WEB SITES.,JUST REMEMBER 1 THING I DONT COOK OR SM0KE JUST FOR ME I CREATE NOT FOR ME BUT ALL MY NEIGHBORS FRIENDS AND TO ALL WHO I SEE..ITS MY GIFT TO THIS WORLD TO GIVE FOOD SUCH A LIFE BEING SINGLE BUT MY ROOTS VENTURE FAR ALWAYS REMENBER ..WHAT YOU READ ON THE WEB.DONT MEAN ANYTHING UNLESS YOU MAKE IT REAL..USDA GUESS THEY NEED MEDIVAC.....always cookin mike ...mvadakin@charter .net
post #23 of 39
If you had read my entire post you would have found info in my google search to also back your side, it said this


"Some sites also say 170° for breast and 180° for the thigh, so there's a lot of info out there to back up both sides of this, personally I brine(don't baste with the brine) and bring the breast to 170°"
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post #24 of 39
MAVADAKIN, I don't think anyone said that you were wrong. If you look at my thread from yesterday ... I went the 170*. I believe we just refered to what the U.S.D.A. is saying about the 165*.
post #25 of 39
I don't know why they lowered the temperatures on turkeys but I did my last one at 165 degrees and the meat on the leg bones (drumsticks) was still to raw looking for my liking.

I threw those babies back on the smoker for another 20 minutes!

What the USDA says you can do, and what a person actually does may differ from person to person. I'll keep smoking my birds to 170 - 175 degrees and let it rest up to 180 before eatting. I never had a dry bird yet - not even in the oven!
post #26 of 39
BLACKIE DO YOU SEE YOUR RESPONE HELLO YAHOO SAYS THIS WHAT EVER YOU TRIEAD ..........TRY IT BEFORE COMENT MYGOD I CAN GET 10,000,000 RECIPES ON LINE..WHICH ONE YA WANT.....LETS GET REAL OR CAll medivac
post #27 of 39
Easy does it - it's just a comment you can use it as a guide or not it's up to you! smile.gif
post #28 of 39
When you post in caps you're yelling and I don't take well to being yelled at, one more time I say that my post backed up your temps also, I flew enough Medivac ,that is not something I joke about or take lightly, it was not fun. You've made up your mind and I'm not trying to change it, I said in my first post that there was info there to back up both sides but your being to closed minded about it and I'm tired of being yelled at. You Win.
post #29 of 39
The truth of the matter is this and I think I wrote this in one of my tutorials.. the USDA for many years recommended 180 degrees for poultry but realized that this was overkill just a year or two ago.

The USDA does not make changes or recommendations without proper analysis and scientific evidence to back up what they are saying and if they did they would be liable.

There newest recommendation is 165 which brings the bird to perfection instead of drying out the meat like 180 does.

With poultry, every degree matters and brining is a no brainer for the most part in my opinion.

Having said that.. if you feel more comfortable with the higher temp then go for it. At SMF we are going to go with the recommendation made by the USDA on all meats.

180 will not hurt a thing.. just make sure you brine and have some gravy because it will be a little dry especially in the white meat portions.

I usually err on the side of caution and cook all poultry to 167 which gives me a safety net of a couple of degrees without getting dry meat.

At this temp, I have never had red near the bone and never had dry chicken or turkey.

Everyone is entitled to your opinion and to argue opinions is like arguing whether you should like pizza or not.. doesn't really change anything and.. when it is all over, some will still like pizza and some won't.
post #30 of 39
Jeff, your last paragraph sums it up. Personally, I like chicks and I like pizza.
post #31 of 39
Well, I was readin' along, sayin'...yep...yep...I agree. But then I get to the pizza thing, and dog gone it, this is America, and we eat pizza! I mean how can ya' not like Pizza!icon_razz.gif
post #32 of 39
I'm new to smoking so I have a rookie question. Everyone agrees that the meat will continue to cook after it's out of the smoker. So when you discuss 165 as being done, is that when you take it off or do you take it off earlier and let it rise to 165?
post #33 of 39
Ttown - pull it at that temp it will go another few degrees after you pull it.
post #34 of 39

Turkey Nervosa

As October is knocking, I think of Thanksgiving Turkey. Then I get the sweats thinking What if I screw it up? My plan is 15 lbs. Brine overnight, inject with something nice, rub with olive oil and then a collection of spices, fill cavity with apple,celery,onion,garlic. Cook 325-350 'till 170deg. Basting when I refill my drink. Oh and use apple/cherry wood chunks. I DON'T want rubber skin. I DO want juicy white meat. I figure I'll cover with foil for 30 min. after it's out.
Sooooo, will I screw it up? Any suggestions appreciated. I can't repeat last year's mess or the wife will shoot a hole in my GOSM.
post #35 of 39
I made the "worth the wait" turkey in the Smoke & Spice book (pg 190) using the injection and the paste but not the mop a couple of weeks ago. I had not read this about the new USDA approved 165 temperature yet and so did it to 180 like the books said to. I was using an ECB charcoal with the water pan, and I tell you, that was the best dang bird I've ever had! Moist as all get-out. Skin was a bit rubbery but now I've read how I could have crisped it out some by finishing at a 300 temp for about half hour.

Can't wait to try it again!
post #36 of 39
Nice call. They both come in lots of variety and this is good!
Besides, Beer goes well with both. :)
post #37 of 39

  I just read the USDA web site concerning internal temps, and it says 165 degress.

post #38 of 39

the breast will be done by 165, but the thighs will be red at the bone, and more than likely so will the breast bone be red. I would eat it and I know one or two others that would but if you were to serve it to the general public or 99% of your friends they would not, all the talk of under under cooked birds has people confused and they see red and right away they think raw or under cooked.

post #39 of 39

I highly reccomend a brine as well! From what i've been told/read, turkeys and chickens were not meant to be cooked slow and low and will tend to dry out if you do.. unless you brine!!! Give brineing a try! Search for Tip's brine.

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