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Types of curing salts - Page 2

post #21 of 29

Yes each one has its place as well as each one of us has our own opinions!  What is right for my curing needs might not be right for next person!

post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pineywoods View Post

But have you tried the hi mountain buckboard bacon cure if not try it

I have not tried it. Heard Hi mountain is salty?
post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 

Living in Thailand I am kinda limited on obtaining MTQ, and other curing salts.  I have the 6 kilo's of the Butchers Quick and can't find the measurements.  I emptied the bag and no instructions inside.  I have sent them an email, but haven't heard back.

 

Chalee

post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by c farmer View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pineywoods View Post

But have you tried the hi mountain buckboard bacon cure if not try it

I have not tried it. Heard Hi mountain is salty?

Not sure bout the BBB cure, but their jerky cure & seasoning rocks ! icon14.gif
post #25 of 29
Im going to smoke sausage and was wondering which curing salt to use. I have Prague powder #2 but now think I should of purchased #1. I'm going to slow smoke until IT reaches 152* F and then just let them get a cold smoke after that. We let these hang and dry a bit after taking them out of freezer before we eat them or sometimes eat them before they dry out completely. Am I alright with the Prague #2?
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Fucco View Post

Im going to smoke sausage and was wondering which curing salt to use. I have Prague powder #2 but now think I should of purchased #1. I'm going to slow smoke until IT reaches 152* F and then just let them get a cold smoke after that. We let these hang and dry a bit after taking them out of freezer before we eat them or sometimes eat them before they dry out completely. Am I alright with the Prague #2?


You are correct to purchase cure #1.... Cure #2, nitrate, is intended for meats that are cured for long periods of time and not necessarily cooked...

http://www.susanminor.org/forums/showthread.php?736-Curing-Salts

Cure #2 has the same curing and food preservative properties as sodium nitrite, and the extended curing time of sodium nitrate. It is specifically formulated to be used for making uncooked dry cured products that require several weeks to several months to cure. Dry curing meat or sausage properly cannot be done with Cure #1 which contains sodium nitrite only; it dissipates too quickly.

Cure #2 can be compared to the time release capsules used in medicines – the sodium nitrites start working immediately, while the sodium nitrates slowly reduce over time into sodium nitrites. Thus allowing for the much longer curing times required to dry cure, which can take up to 6 months. Generally used in such sausages as pepperoni, hard salami, geonoa salami, prosciutto hams, dried farmers sausage, capicola and others that do not require cooking, smoking, or refrigeration.
post #27 of 29
Thank you. I ordered the #1 and sent back the #2. Is there a certain amount of time it should be mixed in meat before going into smoke house?
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Fucco View Post

Thank you. I ordered the #1 and sent back the #2. Is there a certain amount of time it should be mixed in meat before going into smoke house?

For whole muscle meat...... As a general rule, mix the cure #1 with an appropriate amount of salt, sugar and spices for the hunk of meat you want to cure.... apply the mix and let sit for at the very least, 24 hours per 1/4" inch of thickness... applying the mix to all sides.... longer is better.. and it needs to be in the refer.... What you are trying to obtain is a completely homogenized piece of meat with the mix... consider this example.... when you apply salt, the surface of the meat is pure salt... it takes time for the salt to penetrate so the surface and center are the same saltiness.. I prefer 12-14 days for a pork belly, as an example...

For ground meats like sausage, when properly mixed in with the meat 12 hours is adequate as it has come in contact with all the small ground particles... it will take longer for any spices to "bloom" and give a good flavor to the product...
post #29 of 29
How long before the #1 stops working? Days, weeks?
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