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Summer sausage maximum cabinet temperature

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Can you go above 180 degrees cabinet temperature when making sausage? I have only made 5lb batches until this weekend when I made a 10lb batch. I have never set the temp above 180 and I get my 5lb batches to temp just fine. However, this time was different story.

It was cool and windy outside but not unlike some of my other batches. The only other difference was I used soy protein this time and I added 1 ½ cups of water before stuffing (I did this to help with the stuffing). My internal temp would only get to 126. Is it okay to go above 180? What is your max temp? I use a Bradley digital 4-rack.

 

post #2 of 19
the wind and outside temp could have been throwing things off. if you go to high with smoker temp you will have a fat out from your sausages. May have to keep temp low and run a lil longer
post #3 of 19
I wouldn't go higher than 180. Larger batches will take longer.
post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies. So let me ask you guys this. Why in the instructions would they list your kitchen oven as an option for cooking the sausage at 300 degrees for 1.5 hours or internal temp of 165. Wouldn't this cook the fat out the same as the smoker would? I am just curious, why is it okay for high temps in the oven but not in the smoker? Or should one just expect lower quality sausage from the oven?

 

Thanks again.

post #5 of 19

I think they don't want the responsibility of asking someone to keep their oven going at 165-180 for upwards of 6 hrs. When I 1st started making summer sausage I tried some of the higher temp recipes, and while edible it came out more like cold meat loaf then a summer sausage. I've found a cabinet temp of 165-175 to make the best product. It's just sometimes batch size or outside elements make it take a lot longer to reach the finishing internal temp. That's why there is beer & TV sports!

post #6 of 19

F32, I have finished sausage in my oven at its lowest setting (165ish) but a setting of 300 would be a disaster for your sausage .

post #7 of 19

If you cook / smoke your sausage too hot and fast you won't like the way it comes out...hard and dry. Typically when smoking sausage you need to start out around 120 deg then raise the temp every hour. The process usually takes 5 to 6 hours. Once your meat reaches a temp of 152 deg then remove it from smoker and bloom it...basically running under cold water to stop the cooking process. Dry the sausage off and from there it goes into the frig unwrapped on a rack for at least few hours. After that you can package it up. 

post #8 of 19

You can do sausage in your kitchen oven, electric ovens are better as you can get lower temps of 150-170. In any type of oven/smoker try not to exceed 170* as you could get a fat-out of the meat. If you pull the sausage at an IT of 150* (no cold water) it will get to the target IT of 151-152 by itself. In the end do what works for you. You will get all sorts of posts here and they are very good.

 

I lived 22 years next to Amish and learned some tricks. Remember the longer in the fridge (un wrapped) the drier your sausage will be, this is smoked sausage and semi dry to dry (not dripping rare prime rib)

 

Have fun

post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 

Just for reference, I was at the 8 1/2 hour mark in the process and hung up on 126 degrees. At 180 I could not get the IT any higher. Not sure why I couldn't get above that mark. I moved the thermometer around, played with the vent, everything I could think of and nothing. Should I have given it more time?

post #10 of 19

Yes, a temp. stall is not uncommon. I have read it is due to the meat sweating out moisture and actually cooling the product. The internal temps. will eventually begin to rise. I'm sure one of the more knowledgeable guys on this site can explain it better!

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fitch32 View Post
 

Just for reference, I was at the 8 1/2 hour mark in the process and hung up on 126 degrees. At 180 I could not get the IT any higher. Not sure why I couldn't get above that mark. I moved the thermometer around, played with the vent, everything I could think of and nothing. Should I have given it more time?


Stalls with sausage are very common and happen between IT temps of 125-135. Best thing to do is be patient and let the chubs do their thing. Keep smoker temps below 180 or your going to fat-out. I have had chubs in the smoker from 7 to 14 hours. Yes you can rotate the chubs if needed.

post #12 of 19
As the other have said just be patient. Especially if you are using the step method for temp. My last batch of 3 lb chubs took a total of 16 hours to hit the magic IT.
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 

You guys are awesome! I really don't know what I would do with out this site. Being a novice, probably just drink beer and slam my head in the smoker door! Thanks a lot.

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fitch32 View Post
 

You guys are awesome! I really don't know what I would do with out this site. Being a novice, probably just drink beer and slam my head in the smoker door! Thanks a lot.

I know this is old, but:
I see you have some good help already, but I figured I'd slip a comment in here.

 

You ran into one of the reasons I don't hold much store in anything Morton Salt says. After using Tender Quick, they tell you to use 325° oven temp on Summer Sausage, Pepperoni, Salami, and other kinds of sausage. I've gone over 180° already, but never above boiling temp.

 

 

Bear

post #15 of 19
Well....I'm screwed! I can't get my smoker to go down in temp. I'm at 300 degrees! LOL

I know I'm a newb to smoking. My first attempt was a tri-tip that, although, a mild success for me as it was my first time...it was over cooked.

I'm doing Summer Sausages today. Using a combination of lump mesquite charcoal to get it started and a mix of woods above the coals.

My main wood is mesquite
Hickory (about 50% the amount of the mesquite)
Cherry and apple (about 25% of the mesquite for each)
Pecan is very minimal. Just a little.

Im able to get the heat down a little by propping the main lid up a couple of inches and keeping the airflow vent, on the smoker box closed.


Wish me luck.
post #16 of 19

300 is way way to high. Fat-out for sure.

The lump burns hot, how much you got in there?

post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryan Payton View Post

Well....I'm screwed! I can't get my smoker to go down in temp. I'm at 300 degrees! LOL

I know I'm a newb to smoking. My first attempt was a tri-tip that, although, a mild success for me as it was my first time...it was over cooked.

I'm doing Summer Sausages today. Using a combination of lump mesquite charcoal to get it started and a mix of woods above the coals.

My main wood is mesquite
Hickory (about 50% the amount of the mesquite)
Cherry and apple (about 25% of the mesquite for each)
Pecan is very minimal. Just a little.

Im able to get the heat down a little by propping the main lid up a couple of inches and keeping the airflow vent, on the smoker box closed.


Wish me luck.
What kind of smoker are you using?
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by nepas View Post


Stalls with sausage are very common and happen between IT temps of 125-135. Best thing to do is be patient and let the chubs do their thing. Keep smoker temps below 180 or your going to fat-out. I have had chubs in the smoker from 7 to 14 hours. Yes you can rotate the chubs if needed.
What he said. I always finish my sausage in the electric oven because my mailbox/hotplate setup won't go over around 150. At 180 oven temp my last batch of snack sticks stuck at 130 for almost an hour!
Whatever you do, don't get impatient and bump the heat up. I did it once and ruined the batch. Lesson learned...
Dan
post #19 of 19
FullSizeRender.jpg 1372k .jpg file

Char-Griller. Indirect.

Can also be used as a regular BBQ too. I know it's not fancy but this is what my budget could afford this summer. Hoping to get a much better one like a Traeger pellet style. I understand they're way easier to use and the meats come out amazing.

I'm doing my tri-trip today using a layer of normal charcoals (Jack Daniels 'cause I just wanted to try them) with my soaked wood above. Cross your fingers for it to hold 250 degrees constant.

B.
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