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Apple pork sausage - Page 2

post #21 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanMcG View Post

SmokinBurt, Here's a link to an apple onion sausage I did a while back. Its a low fat sausage put could easily be made with a nice fatty butt.
http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/118465/low-fat-apple-and-caramelized-onion-pork-loin-sausage


Thanks Dan,

 

I'll give that one a try sometime.

 

SMB

post #22 of 38

Hi Smokeraiser

 

240 is really high for smoking sausage..... smoke them 160 degrees no more than 170.... 240 they will dry out.. also when u bring them out of your smoker soak them in cold water until temp drops to 100 degrees.

 

They look good though....

post #23 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamheart View Post

I have actually had the same idea, but I was thinkin a pork/apple. Somewhere I read that apple sauce is considered a binder (I don't know, but I read it somewhere). Without getting carried away with spices, maybe some ground pork, some powdered milk to help hold that apple sauce binder and maybe some allspice or caraway or cinnamin. If we could get those propotions down right would be a killer in a pan of cabbage!

You did an excellent job making them, and believe me I know about the occassional dissapointment here. But its all a learning experience, and thats where we each gather our knowldge for the next time, right?

Job well done my man, job well done.

Thanks. I had some high hopes but even though it didn't turn out as expected I still had fun and am going to keep trying.
Cheers
Mark
post #24 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr B View Post

Hi Smokeraiser

240 is really high for smoking sausage..... smoke them 160 degrees no more than 170.... 240 they will dry out.. also when u bring them out of your smoker soak them in cold water until temp drops to 100 degrees.

They look good though....

I was trying to do the ribs at the same time which had me set the higher temp. Probably not the best idea there. The smoke was about 3 hours before I took them off. A higher IT than I planed for, but the end result texture was good for what I like. The casing was a little dry and crispy with the inside juicy. Just tried a left over cold one and had a good snap. Spices still undesirable. Probably not going to try to do two things at the same time again and go for the lower smoke temp. Thank yo for the insights. Does the cold water help?
post #25 of 38

yes..... smoke the as stated before.... after smoking is complete remove and cold water asap..... because if you let them just sit, they will wrinkle up like if they were old.... if that happens you can boil some water and put them in there for a few seconds to plump the back....

TRIAL AND ERROR.... makes you get better and better.....

 

What happens with smoking high temp for sausage is that the fat melts to fast and leaks.... i just place a few pics of mine online...

"Smoked Garlic Sausage"

"Boudin Boudin"

post #26 of 38

you did a good job though!!!!!

 

if you had an after taste.... it could be that the sausage did not dry before the smoke was applied.... they were moist because of the other meat on the smoker....

post #27 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdboatbum View Post

Great job!! It looks like it'll be really tasty.
You mentioned a "small after taste" you might want to change. My guess is it was from the coriander. The nutmeg and ginger should play nicely with both the apples and the pork, so I can't see them causing an issue. Coriander does have kind of an astringent taste ( think pastrami) so it might be clashing with the other flavors.

The coriander is the after taste I think that didn't work. I put more of that in than the others. Scratching my head as to why I put it in at all. Maybe the apple pie taste was just bad to start with. It was a good experience to try. Thanks for your thoughts.
post #28 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr B View Post

yes..... smoke the as stated before.... after smoking is complete remove and cold water asap..... because if you let them just sit, they will wrinkle up like if they were old.... if that happens you can boil some water and put them in there for a few seconds to plump the back....
TRIAL AND ERROR.... makes you get better and better.....

What happens with smoking high temp for sausage is that the fat melts to fast and leaks.... i just place a few pics of mine online...
"Smoked Garlic Sausage"
"Boudin Boudin"

Thanks for the insight. I can use this as a learning experience.
Cheers
Mark
post #29 of 38
Yes....we all screwed up along sometime or another.....i know some years back i messed up 40lbs of boudin....i was not a happy camper
post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr B View Post

Yes....we all screwed up along sometime or another.....i know some years back i messed up 40lbs of boudin....i was not a happy camper

And that is why its good to make small batches till it gets perfect.
post #31 of 38

Yes sir we have all had a failure's  but you will know better next time. and another thing You never know till you try !

 

Gary

post #32 of 38


Well fellas...

 

It's not my intention to smoke the apple/onion sausage if I make a batch. I think I'd enjoy it as a fresh sausage better, much the same as that I tried where I used to work. I make a garlic, parsley and cheese fresh sausage that I enjoy but I can't bring myself to smoke any, at least not so far... it's too darn good the way it is. Yes, we've all made mistakes when making our sausages. When I first started making my own sausage many moons ago, it didn't take long to break myself of the old mindset that if so much of something is good, then more has to be better. I don't mind hot sausage being hotter than the masses prefer, so more hot pepper is fine by me, but that's about the only thing I can think of where more is better. It's fun to experiment, but always do it in small batches, that's another thing I learned early on in my sausage making trials and tribulations.

 

SMB

post #33 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by c farmer View Post


And that is why its good to make small batches till it gets perfect.

 

Whatcha talkin bout Willis?

 

Always stuff at least 50 pounds just in case you have beginers luck! LOL..... No matter how I try to curb that feeling its alway gets the last word. LOL More is better, more is better more is better. I guess I am to smoking what "Tim 'The Toolman' Taylor was to power tools..... I can't help myself I need a doctor.

 

Its why I constantly tell myself how lucky I was to buy a 5 lb stuffer!!

post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamheart View Post
 

 

Whatcha talkin bout Willis?

 

Always stuff at least 50 pounds just in case you have beginers luck! LOL..... No matter how I try to curb that feeling its alway gets the last word. LOL More is better, more is better more is better. I guess I am to smoking what "Tim 'The Toolman' Taylor was to power tools..... I can't help myself I need a doctor.

 

Its why I constantly tell myself how lucky I was to buy a 5 lb stuffer!!

Glad you feel that way... I personally can't see making a large batch of something new only to discover that I don't like it. As far as more is better, I'm sticking to my ideology on that as well. About ten years ago, I came up with a kick azz recipe for meatballs. The Mrs. and I usually make a  20-30 lb. batch every year after harvesting a deer or two. My buddies being what they are (vultures) never come up with anything of their own but they're always quick to bum my recipes when I come up with something everyone likes. One buddy of mine made a large batch of meatballs and of course had to apply the "more is better" philosophy instead of adhering to what was a great recipe. Well, his meatballs taste like a garlic clove with a slight hint of meat in the background. I told him, "Whatever you do, don't tell anyone that's my recipe".

 

SMB

post #35 of 38

I make an apple sausage that I use in meatloaf.  It's very similar to what you have barring a few exceptions.  Here's what I'd do:

 

Skip the brown sugar and the coriander.  

Use a little more cinnamon.  

Swap out your Golden Delicious for Fuji's since we need sweetness now.

Add a Tbsp or two of salt and liberally pepper the pork.

Swap the cup of water for apple cider with a Tbsp or two of apple cider vinegar (bumps up the "appleness")

 

Take 4-6 Fuji or similar sweet red apple and quarter them.  Use a pairing knife to cut off the skin and the core.  Dice down into dime sized chunks or feed them to your meat grinder if you can get a chunky cut.  As long as you don't lose juice you're good.  Set a large skillet on medium-low to medium heat.  Start some diced red bell peppers in butter.  Once they just start to go soft add your apples.  Stir that for a few minutes until the apples start to look wet and brown and then add diced onion.  You want to keep this mixture working until your onions are clear and your peppers are super soft.  Add butter if you have to keep the pan wet just don't let it pool up and fry stuff.  Once it starts to get tight and sticks together or your apples begin to brown you're done.  

 

Combine spices to cold pork and add apple/pepper mixture.  Mix it in quickly so you don't cook the pork up.  Once well combined cover it in plastic and leave it in the fridge for 24 hours to marry your flavors then stuff your sticks.  I'd use apple or cherry to keep it mild since I made an effort on the filling but you run your smoker how you want.

post #36 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr B View Post
 

Hi Smokeraiser

 

240 is really high for smoking sausage..... smoke them 160 degrees no more than 170.... 240 they will dry out.. also when u bring them out of your smoker soak them in cold water until temp drops to 100 degrees.

 

They look good though....

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokeraiser View Post


I was trying to do the ribs at the same time which had me set the higher temp. Probably not the best idea there. The smoke was about 3 hours before I took them off. A higher IT than I planed for, but the end result texture was good for what I like. The casing was a little dry and crispy with the inside juicy. Just tried a left over cold one and had a good snap. Spices still undesirable. Probably not going to try to do two things at the same time again and go for the lower smoke temp. Thank yo for the insights. Does the cold water help?

 

Smokeraiser, these are fresh sausages correct?If they are, then they need to be hot smoked (not 160-170) until IT of 165. You could smoke at 200 to prolong the time in the smoke and they'd reach safe IT in time, but I wouldn't go any lower than that. Also, if they are fresh, you don't have to do a cold water bath after they are done. They should be eaten hot.

 

If Cure was used, then smoke as Mr B says.

 

Good luck on the next batch. Learning is part of the fun of making sausage!

post #37 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgautheir20420 View Post



Smokeraiser, these are fresh sausages correct?If they are, then they need to be hot smoked (not 160-170) until IT of 165. You could smoke at 200 to prolong the time in the smoke and they'd reach safe IT in time, but I wouldn't go any lower than that. Also, if they are fresh, you don't have to do a cold water bath after they are done. They should be eaten hot.

If Cure was used, then smoke as Mr B says.

Good luck on the next batch. Learning is part of the fun of making sausage!

I didn't use any cure in this. I appreciate all the comments on this thread so far. Enjoying the learning process here. Not going to give up.
post #38 of 38
Good go hear there's gonna be a next try. Just remember it's important to hot smoke fresh sausage abs not as mr b describes.

A buddy of mine is coming over on Sunday and we're doing 10 lb of buffalo chicken and 5 of fresh hot Cajun. All with chicken thighs. It's gonna be fun.
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