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Meat butchering knife - Page 2

post #21 of 38
My favorite is an Old Hickory curved blade handed down from my grandfather. Probably over fifty years old, but still sharp and solid. Made to last, not like some of today's thin steel throwaway knives.
post #22 of 38
I was going to mention Old Hickory, but I don't own one and wasn't sure on the quality. I see them at the hardware store for $10 for the butcher knife and have been tempted.
post #23 of 38
Make sure you get a comfortable knife with a high quality steel ..and a good set of sharpening sticks next to you.
post #24 of 38

Just wanted to address 2 things......

 

1. As far as using a steel.

 

Most people think that when they use a steel, they are sharpening the knife. A steel does not sharpen a knife. The object of a steel is to re-align the molecules of the knife blade, therby getting a cleaner, smoother cut. Can this be mistaken for a knife that "appears" sharper? Sure, but all it is doing is allowing you to work easier.

 

2. As far as the OP question on which knife to use.

 

As others have said, stay away from the well known "quality" brands. They are very good at marketing, but their knives are mediocre at best. Most will dull out VERY quickly, even if using a steel prior to each use.

 

What knife do you want? Simple. Walk around flea markets, search Ebay, etc., and get yourself a good old carbon steel butchers knife or carving knife. Find yourself a Case knife from the 1950-60's, sharpen it correctly and wipe down with vegetable oil after each use (so it doesn't rust). It will be the last knife you will ever need to buy. Best part is that it will only cost you a couple of bucks.

 

Also, get yourself a sharpening stone (flat) and learn how to use it. NEVER use one of those things you draw the knife through a couple of wheels. Absolutely the worst thing you can do to a blade.

post #25 of 38

Take a look at this knife.  It's a great everyday knife that I have done many different things with.  It keeps a good edge and it's pretty reasonable.  I bout it for about $25. a few years back.  I see it's now about $40.  If it means anything to you, take a look at the percentage of positive reviews on Amazon.  Either way, I like this knife.  I broke down a 35lb chunk of meat for a friend when I made jerky for him.  Let us know what you end up with.   Good luck!

 

http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-47521-10-Inch-Fibrox-Handle/dp/B0000CF8YO/ref=sr_1_5?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1412467613&sr=1-5&keywords=victorinox+knife+12+inch

post #26 of 38

Just a quick comment about sharpening, I agree with  "RobertWhite"  about the sharpening steel.  I use this system for sharpening.  It works very well for me.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Spyderco-Tri-Angle-Sharpmaker-Sharpener-204MF/dp/B000Q9C4AE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1412467962&sr=8-1&keywords=spyderco+sharpmaker

 

Again, good luck!

post #27 of 38

I have a set of Wusthofs I use a lot. I also have some cheaper knives that also work well. It is all a mater of what the blade is made of.

Happy smoken.

David

post #28 of 38
I ha
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Sicc View Post

Take a look at this knife.  It's a great everyday knife that I have done many different things with.  It keeps a good edge and it's pretty reasonable.  I bout it for about $25. a few years back.  I see it's now about $40.  If it means anything to you, take a look at the percentage of positive reviews on Amazon.  Either way, I like this knife.  I broke down a 35lb chunk of meat for a friend when I made jerky for him.  Let us know what you end up with.   Good luck!

http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-47521-10-Inch-Fibrox-Handle/dp/B0000CF8YO/ref=sr_1_5?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1412467613&sr=1-5&keywords=victorinox+knife+12+inch

That's my knife!!!

Just a word to the wise... If you go into a restaurant supply store tell them you work at a local restaurant or hotel you'll get at least a 10% discount.
post #29 of 38

I use, for meatcutting, several basic, non-fancy knives.  Chicago Cutlery, Dexter, Victorinox, and so on.  I have two steels - a regular medium steel

 

 

and a diamond steel.

 

 

 The regular steel hones the edge of the knife, standing it up when it rolls over, but does not sharpen.  The diamond steel actually removes metal as well as setting up the edge.  But steeling a knife is not sharpening a knife.  I have had many many years of experience with a single sided

 

and two-sided stones

plus the triple-sided knife sharpener with coarse, medium and fine stones in a revolving mechanism that keeps the stones bathed in honing oil.

 In the meatrooms, however, they usually provide a HookEye belt sharpener:

 

 

You have to have experience and training on this machine as it can burn up, remove blade temper and destroy a brand new knife in seconds; it takes a light touch.

 

However, Work Sharp® has come out with a new line of sharpeners that work very nicely for the amateur, similar to the HookEye but not nearly as powerful, yet still accurate and can put a good edge on a knife.   Remember, you are putting a burr on the edge of the knife to cut with, like micro-teeth.  When it gets bent over, you have to 'set up' the burr again with a steel.  When the knife loses its burr, you must then sharpen it to re-establish the burr.

 

I got mine from Northern Tool and for me, it does a fine job, esp. since having my strokes.  It is inexpensive, the belts are replaceable, and it can produce a sharp edge on a knife, I paid $69 for mine.

 

Now, purists in knife sharpening want to take off the burr, to a fine polished edge, like a Japanese water stone.  I am no purist.  Meat is tough with sinew and ligaments and skin and bone.  I want quick, efficient knife sharpening so I can continue cutting meat up safely and efficiently.  A dull knife is a danger to the operator.  Some of my knives:

 

 

 

All good, solid, sharpenable quality, but not overly-expensive knives.  The two wood-handled, carbon steel knives are great knives, got from my dad in the meat room before stainless knives were required, they're over 50+ years old.  If you go to a lot of rummage sales, you may find some good carbon steel knives of meat cutting quality.   Antique stores usually grab them up for themselves if they have any idea what they have, however. 

 

There are plenty of videos and instructions on how to sharpen knives on the internet, I won't even attempt to duplicate them here.  Restaurant Supply retailers in your home town can usually supply great knives at a reasonable price ($25 - $100).  Also, I use Hubert, Koch Supplies, and Ace Mart for reference and ordering, too.

post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgautheir20420 View Post
 

Chef, I'd be very happy to get that knife as a heirloom from you. Do you need my address? :drool:

 

brook, the Dexter knives popped up on my searches, so I might look into those. I think 6" is a little small for what I'm wanting though. Do you find it "meats" all your needs....haha!

I just butchered 2 whole deer with only 2- 6 in. flexible Dexter's & a 12 in. hacksaw. I use 2 so I don't have to touch up the edge til I'm done. I use the basic line less then $6 here >

http://www.foodservicewarehouse.com/   

I also recommend one of these >  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00004S1B8/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=

post #31 of 38

These are my go-to knives. The top one is an Oneida which I've named The Chickenhawk because the blade shape is perfect for cutting up a chicken. The bottom one is a no-name cleaver that I prefer for vegetables.

 

 

And then, there's this guy. It'll cut a turkey in half.

 

post #32 of 38

Victorinox Fibrox Knives!

 

Bang for the buck they are a great blade! They take an edge well and will last a long time if cared for, but even if you trash one you are generally only out $30-$50. America's Test Kitchen does knife reviews every couple of years and the victorinox fibrox line beats out a lot of "high end" very expensive knives every time. A lot of people look down on them because of the plastic handle, but these are a real hidden gem once you get to know them.

 

And like the others said, invest in a good steel as well.

post #33 of 38
Thread Starter 

Man I never expected this much information to come out of this thread. Thanks every so much!! I will be tackling this new knife soon and will be looking for a good place to have a good. Thanks again!

post #34 of 38

For anyone who may be new to the forum.

 

Forschner and Fibrox knives are from Victorinox.

 

A well known Swiss company that produces reasonably priced knives.

 

Good luck and good smoking.

post #35 of 38
post #36 of 38
Ended up here using the search button. Just got done fighting the rind on a pork belly using the wifes beloved Henckels.....never again with her knives. She may like them but no thanks. Gotta wonder if that 20* angle is a hinderance???
post #37 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by inkjunkie View Post

Ended up here using the search button. Just got done fighting the rind on a pork belly using the wifes beloved Henckels.....never again with her knives. She may like them but no thanks. Gotta wonder if that 20* angle is a hinderance???

 

Just an FYI, its a heck of alot easier to remove the skin right after smoking, before the mellow reefer stage. The fat is all soft and the knife just glides along the skin.

post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamheart View Post

Just an FYI, its a heck of alot easier to remove the skin right after smoking, before the mellow reefer stage. The fat is all soft and the knife just glides along the skin.

The wife wants to make Chicharones from the skin. I asked a few folks if i could still make them if the skin was not removed prior to smoking.....folks I asked were unsure so I figured better safe than sorry. But next time I will be finding out....
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