or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Beef › going to do my first brisket...qview added
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

going to do my first brisket...qview added - Page 2

post #21 of 36
Thread Starter 

At hour 15..sitting at 187 degrees. Probably going to go ahead and pull it off the smoker in a few minutes and get it wrapped and in the cooler until we wake up. Actually, it may stay in the cooler until  after church (11:30 or so). 9 hours won't hurt it, will it?

 

Thanks for the guidance and tips. I definitely know what I'll be doing next time! 

 

I'll add pics of the finished product tomorrow..

post #22 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingt36 View Post

At hour 15..sitting at 187 degrees. Probably going to go ahead and pull it off the smoker in a few minutes and get it wrapped and in the cooler until we wake up. Actually, it may stay in the cooler until  after church (11:30 or so). 9 hours won't hurt it, will it?

 

Thanks for the guidance and tips. I definitely know what I'll be doing next time! 

 

I'll add pics of the finished product tomorrow..

 

9 hours? Yikes!!! That's way too long, even for a large full packer, and will drop into the danger-zone temps (40-140*) for quite some time before you get around to processing it for serving. I strongly recommend you process it after 3-4 hours and chill to reheat (covered pan on the oven, crock-pot etc, @ ~250* with a bit of added liquids for steam)...probably not what you wanted to read, but that's the jist of it.

 

 

Eric

post #23 of 36
Thread Starter 
No problem with that at all..I will probably do just that..

Thought I'd share a couple of pre-rest pics while I'm still up:


The fat cap side..


The other side..
post #24 of 36

GREAT caramelization! Lookin' very nice from where I'm sitting!

 

 

Eric

post #25 of 36
Thread Starter 
The brisket tastes ok. I used Jeff's rub and while I love it on pork, I don't really care for the sweetness of the bark on brisket. Next time, I'll go with SPOG. I will definitely use Eric's method as well.

Here are some pics:



I decided to go ahead and try my hand at some burnt ends also. They are on the smoker now. Here are some prep pics.







Thanks again for your guidance!
post #26 of 36
Thread Starter 
Burnt ends

post #27 of 36

It looks great, Trae!  I'm with you on the SPOG for brisket...I usually either do that or Montreal Seasoning for all beef.  Not a fan of sugar-based rubs on beef.

 

Nicely done!

 

Red

post #28 of 36

Great job on your first brisket!

 

Looks nice! How was the interior moisture? Was it hot, warm or cold when sliced/cubed and pics taken? I know it's harder to judge after chilling, and if reheated, you can force more moisture out of the meat, but did it seem dry at all? I know you'll need to wait until after you eat some of the sliced and BE's to judge the overall moisture, and I'll wait for your response on that. I could see a bit of moisture on the surface of the cuts in the pics, but it's harder to tell without knowing if it was hot, warm or cold when sliced and when the pics were taken...just trying to get a feel for you thoughts on the moisture and compare to what I've been experiencing use the wet-to-dry chamber method, as the retained moisture content should improve for you just as it has for me.

 

With your first brisket soon behind you, you can look back on this smoke and compare it to what you achieve using the wet-to-dry method...you should notice an improvement in moisture retention right away. If bark on your brisket is not what you want, that can be softened as I explained in brisket thread (or here...can't remember...better look in my thread again, though), so this method can be modified to suit your personal preferences with a little forethought and still gain the main benefits.

 

You're welcome for the help...always happy to help. I'll be around if you need any help getting the wet-to-dry method off the ground and rolling...pretty simple and easy to do though, and once it's set up, it does all the rest of the work for you without much input.

 

 

Eric

post #29 of 36
Thread Starter 
It did have some moisture, though I would have preferred a little more. That said, I wouldn't call it dry at all. The burnt ends came out pretty good. My only complaints are the sweetness of the rub and the lack of smoke ring. Which I'm sure was because it stopped producing smoke abut an hour in.

I think the reason it stopped producing smoke is because I put the chunks on the outside corners of the chip box and the chips in the middle. When I was checking it yesterday I could see that the chunks were still pretty brown, so didn't bother to pull out the box to check and assumed that the chips were the same. I found out today that all of the chips in the middle turned to ash. Next time I'll reverse that and put the chunks in the middle.
post #30 of 36
congratulation_graphics_2.gif

That looks really Great Trae!!!! I'm happy it all worked out, now it just keeps getting easier and better!!!
post #31 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingt36 View Post

It did have some moisture, though I would have preferred a little more. That said, I wouldn't call it dry at all. The burnt ends came out pretty good. My only complaints are the sweetness of the rub and the lack of smoke ring. Which I'm sure was because it stopped producing smoke abut an hour in.

I think the reason it stopped producing smoke is because I put the chunks on the outside corners of the chip box and the chips in the middle. When I was checking it yesterday I could see that the chunks were still pretty brown, so didn't bother to pull out the box to check and assumed that the chips were the same. I found out today that all of the chips in the middle turned to ash. Next time I'll reverse that and put the chunks in the middle.

 

As for moisture, I think you'll see an improvement if you roll into the wet-to-dry smoke chamber method...best part is, it gives consistent results.

 

The smoke ring should still be there with a propane, charcoal or wood-fire smoker, even if smoke is non-existent. The smoke ring comes from the burning of any organic matter, really, whether it's smoke wood or fuel, hence, you don't see a smoke ring from an electric cooker, and, why some folks strive to achieve it in electric cookers by pulling some tricks with added charcoal in the smoke wood pan/box, etc.

 

The smoke ring is produced from NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) which is a by-product of fuels burning, and is produced at temperatures above 600*, as I recall.

 

That said, there are factors which can impede the production of smoke ring which cold gave effected yours today, and the I can think of which may have had the most impact are smoke chamber temperature (higher temp = reduced smoke ring), (also effected by meat surface and internal temperatures...too high = lees smoke ring), and humidity, along with surface moisture on the meat (too little of either or both = reduced smoke ring).

 

Hope that makes sense, but if not, my explanations in the wet-to-dry smoke chamber method, how it works, in specific, roll along the same thoughts.

 

Smoke wood chip and chunk placement does matter, as you discovered. It takes a few smokes to learn how each smoker produces heavier, lighter and longer lasting smoke...sounds like you're on that already, by using chips for a more rapid onset of smoke along with using chunks for a longer lasting smoke...good work!

 

Remember, every smoke gets easier and produces better results if you're paying attention to a few details along the way. Stay with it, 'cuz you're doing GREAT!!!

 

 

Eric

post #32 of 36

Eric, do you think it would be okay to preheat a Terra Cotta pot saucer in the WSM while doing the wet chamber smoke so that it won't drop temps when replacing the water with the saucer for the dry chamber smoke?  Or, I guess I could pre-heat the saucer in my Weber Genesis too.

post #33 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayBone View Post

Eric, do you think it would be okay to preheat a Terra Cotta pot saucer in the WSM while doing the wet chamber smoke so that it won't drop temps when replacing the water with the saucer for the dry chamber smoke?  Or, I guess I could pre-heat the saucer in my Weber Genesis too.

 

Sure thing, just heat it up fairly slow so it doesn't stress-fracture and break...indirect on a gas grill would work fine with low to med-low flame. Guys use those pots and saucers a lot for electric and charcoal smokers.

 

 

Eirc

post #34 of 36

Thanks Eric,  I just re-read your brisket wet/dry smoke thread for the second time.  Looks like you set a target IT of 180 because you wanted to pull the meat?  Would you have used a different IT for slicing?  Also, your pea gravel water bowl.  Did you have to add water at some point or just let it evaporate and forget about it?

post #35 of 36

Yup,

I'm in the middle of a 5 hours stall right now on a 6# brisket (150-162* in 5 hours) with smoker temps about 215*. I'm trying to hold off from foiling this time but, we will see.

Scott

post #36 of 36
Thread Starter 

I didn't foil it when mine stalled for 4+ hours, but I wanted to. I did raise the temp by 10 degrees though. It started creeping up slowly after I did that..

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Beef
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Beef › going to do my first brisket...qview added