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Nutrition and Cooking Tips - Page 2

post #21 of 76

Thanks for the great info Pops. I've started adding more fish into our diet, cut back on mayo, sour cream and the like and use avocado, olive oil and more fresh herbs and spices. 

post #22 of 76
Thread Starter 

When eating out, split a meal with your spouse or friend.
Mayo Clinic

 

Linda and I just did that at our favorite Italian Restaurant: Mama Mia's on Magnolia in Fort Worth.  Went there for lunch, we split an antipasto salad and a Italian Sub Sandwich, had olive oil and balsamic vinegar instead of butter on the rolls they served, and balsamic vinegar on the salad!  Half the price, filled us up and was delicious!

post #23 of 76
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokinHusker View Post

Thanks for the great info Pops. I've started adding more fish into our diet, cut back on mayo, sour cream and the like and use avocado, olive oil and more fresh herbs and spices. 



 

Wonderful, take it one-bite-at-a-time and eat healthier but with satisfaction, enjoy your meal!

post #24 of 76

Thanks Pops for keeping us informed and encouraged!!!! Personally I can eat fish and veggies, but hubby likes his red meat, and since he's only home on weekends, I still add in the veggies or salads and give him his elk or venison, which is pretty healthy. 

post #25 of 76
Thread Starter 


Yes, it is lean meat, just be sure to trim as much fat that you can get away with, without him noticing, lol!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokinHusker View Post

Thanks Pops for keeping us informed and encouraged!!!! Personally I can eat fish and veggies, but hubby likes his red meat, and since he's only home on weekends, I still add in the veggies or salads and give him his elk or venison, which is pretty healthy. 



 

 

post #26 of 76
Thread Starter 

Although olive oil has great health benefits, it also has a lot of calories. Its 100 percent fat, and like all liquid oils, contains about 120 calories per tablespoon.
Food Network

post #27 of 76
Thread Starter 

Ok, this one is NOT that healthy, but it is ok to cheat once in a while!  And, of course, you can make them as gifts for "everyone else"!

 

Classic Vanilla Marshmallows


30246_RecipeImage_620x413_vanilla_marshmallows_2.jpg
Pillowy-soft marshmallows are easy to make at home: Make a hot sugar syrup, whip it with gelatin, and let the mixture set before cutting and dusting with a powdered-sugar-and-cornstarch coating. The marshmallows make fun gifts, and they’re unbeatable on top of hot chocolate or melted ins’mores. Watch Shauna Sever, author of Marshmallow Madness! Dozens of Puffalicious Recipes, make these fun treats in her CHOW Tip video.

 

Special equipment: A reliable candy/fat thermometeris crucial for getting an accurate read on the syrup.

Game plan: This marshmallow batter can also be cut into shapes with cookie cutters or used to pipe out marshmallow chicks for Easter.

 

 

 

post #28 of 76
Thread Starter 

Omega-3 fats in seafood protect against heart disease, and recent research has also linked them to lower rates of both depression and Alzheimers disease.
AARP 'Miracle Diet'

post #29 of 76
Thread Starter 

Consider sauteing as a healthy cooking alternative. Cooking food rapidly with a small amount of oil in a hot pan. For some recipes you can use broth, nonstick cooking spray or water in place of oil.
Mayo Clinic

post #30 of 76
Thread Starter 

Traditional Mediterranean herbs such as sage and oregano help battle insulin resistance, a blunting of the bodys ability to balance blood sugar that can raise risks of heart disease and stroke by 28 and 64 percent, respectively.
AARP 'Miracle Diet'

post #31 of 76
Thread Starter 

 

Trim off any visible, solid fat from meat and poultry. This includes the skin on poultry. When roasting a whole chicken or turkey, leave the skin on during cooking, but remove it and the fat underneath before eating. Also, remove any visible fat from pork and beef after cooking.
Mayo Clinic
 
See "Naked Dixee Chicks" in my sig line at the bottom of this post on skinning a chicken and just how much fat there is! 
 
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post #32 of 76
Thread Starter 

Steam vegetables. Then dress them up with flavored vinegars, herbs and spices.
Mayo Clinic

post #33 of 76
Thread Starter 

Most vegetables salad greens, asparagus, green beans, broccoli and zucchini, for example are low in calories but high in volume. Each vegetable serving is about 25 calories, and typical serving sizes are 1 cup raw, a half-cup cooked or 2 cups leafy vegetables. Some vegetables are starchy such as corn, potatoes, sweet potatoes and winter squash and contain more calories, about 70 calories in a half-cup serving.
Mayo Clinic

post #34 of 76
Thread Starter 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/119341/healthy-smoked-turkey-works-bagel-sanwich#post_788817

 

Check out this post from the poultry section... looks delicious!

 

IMG_3089.jpg

post #35 of 76

Pops let not forget our fury friends the rabbit is a great health alternative meat......

post #36 of 76
Thread Starter 

Sipping red wine has long been linked to lower heart-disease risk, but an alcoholic drink isnt the only way to get that benefit. Purple grape juice proved just as effective at lowering total and LDL cholesterol, in animal experiments conducted at the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania.
AARP 'Miracle Diet'
 

post #37 of 76
Thread Starter 


Do you have any recipes or places good to purchase rabbit?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scrappynadds View Post

Pops let not forget our fury friends the rabbit is a great health alternative meat......



 

 

post #38 of 76
Thread Starter 

This is now going on my shopping list!  I've tried and tried drinking a glass of wine a day and just can't do it.  But, Grape Juice shouldn't be a problem, it is 100% natural, no sweeteners in it!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pops6927 View Post

Sipping red wine has long been linked to lower heart-disease risk, but an alcoholic drink isnt the only way to get that benefit. Purple grape juice proved just as effective at lowering total and LDL cholesterol, in animal experiments conducted at the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania.
AARP 'Miracle Diet'
 



 

 

post #39 of 76
Thread Starter 

Drain fat after cooking. After cooking ground meat, drain the fat from the pan and rinse the meat with hot water. Blot the meat with a paper towel to remove the water.
Mayo Clinic
 

post #40 of 76
Thread Starter 

Although garlic and onions may lack the vibrant colors of other vegetables, they contain diallyl sulfide and saponins, compounds that add distinctive flavors to our recipes and fight cancer and heart disease. 
Food Network

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