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Making of hungarian style Csabai with Q-views - Page 2

post #21 of 32

Yeah I usually stick with F' temps and find it simpler now I have a F thermometer on my brinkman.

Heres a simple way to convert from C to F 

 Add 15 to the value and then double it

20 C' becomes 35 x 2 = 70 F

 

To convert F to C divide by two and subtract 15.

post #22 of 32

Awesome thread looking good

post #23 of 32

Great Q-View. Great step by step. Looks delish.

post #24 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnyd View Post

Yeah I usually stick with F' temps and find it simpler now I have a F thermometer on my brinkman.

Heres a simple way to convert from C to F 

 Add 15 to the value and then double it

20 C' becomes 35 x 2 = 70 F

 

To convert F to C divide by two and subtract 15.


Use that formula if you don't need to be accurate. 20*C is really 68*F.

The real formula is:

°F = (9/5)°C+32

°C = (5/9)°F-32

post #25 of 32

Wow! Really spectacular!

post #26 of 32

ok another on my list momma.  LOL

post #27 of 32

Rytek Kutas recommends a similar method in his classic sausage making manual, Great Sausage Making Recipes.  He suggests boiling water and putting the boiling water in a chip bowl in the smoker on the electric burner until the sausage gets to 156, which happens very quickly, but does not melt the fat.  This method is also on the instructional DVD for his smokers that he sells at Sausagemaker.com. That video is a hoot, he sounds like John Candy doing his "Smenge Brothers" routine.  The way he says "Bapy Dial Termometer" cracks me up every time. He can't pronounce "Th," just like my Polish speaking father from the Southwest side of Chicago.  "Thirty third and third comes out as "Tirty tird and tird."  Despite the pronunciation issues, his method really cuts time and keeps the sausage from drying out. ...... And he's written at least one more book than I'll ever write.

post #28 of 32

Thanks, great work!

 

I'm lucky, Joe the local Hungarian butcher will let me hang stuff in his smoke house if there is room.

 

Csabai (czabayi) is possibly the most addictive substance on earth.. -)
 

post #29 of 32

Now the first of the month (food buying day for me) is approaching.

 

I'll buy a cheap and nice cut of meat be it pork or beef, brine it with spices, and will ask to hang it in the smoke house.

 

Biltong, Pemmican, or Hungarian style? Don't yet know, but it's great to experiment!  Best.

post #30 of 32

Laszlo, Thanks for the presentation. took me back to childhood. Aussie born but got to work as you did around my hungarian family at killing time. Fond memories of the uncles coming home with what seemed to me a giant pig and going through the process of making all our various beautiful foods. Between what you have shown me and what my father can teach me I am looking forward to my first go this winter. Just gettingThe traditional summer kitchen ready and buying all the bits and bobs.

Thank you they look great. Oh I think I'm used to seeing the fat a bit larger also.

post #31 of 32

Thanks! Fantastic stuff, hope it works out, thanks for sharing.

 

I agree that the quality of the paprika is the main point, only buy mine bulk from the local Hungarian butcher. You say "...preferably from Szeged area", I'll have to ask.   :-)

 

I use fresh garlic, smashed and blanched quickly to stop the enzymatic activity, a trick I learned from a Polish sausage maker.

 

Do you use a nitrate/nitrite Prague powder before smoking?

post #32 of 32

Those are some damn beautiful links!  Well done sir!  :yahoo:

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