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Smoked Spare Ribs - Page 2

post #21 of 29

Looks good from here!!!

 

Also looks like you learned a lot for your first time!!!

 

I'm betting you'll never forget about using the wife's towel !!!   biggrin.gif

 

 

thanks,

Bear

post #22 of 29

You are on your way.  Don't let these little things stop you.

 

My other half is a dear.  I never hear a word about all the towels she has to wash.  When I am cutting meat and making sausages, I can create a large wash load with all the cleaning up and hand washing that goes into that process.  LOL  Plain white towels from Costco are a bargain.  Bleach the heck out of them and throw them in a cabinet for garage towels when they wear thru.

 

Like Jimmy told you, there is a big difference in spices.  We have a lot of ethnic deli's in my area, so we get to experiment and stock up much cheaper than buying the little bottles of the name brands.

 

Good smoking and good luck.

post #23 of 29

lol i bet that was a tasty surprise:)   re-confusing paprika and cayenne

post #24 of 29

Paul Kirk has two good books, one is a smaller book geared directly for teaching you how to make your own rubs, it has recipes. He also has his Barbecue Championship cook book with lots of good recipes and I'm sure that will help you in making your own rubs. Those are the only two BBQ books I have at the moment. I bought Steven Raichlin's BBQ Bible, but I gave it to my brother. Everything to me seemed to be towards grilling or just things that didn't seem appealing to me.

 

Here's a link to P. Kirk's books

 

http://www.baron-of-bbq.com/Books.htm

post #25 of 29

Looking Good!!

 

To remove the membrane try using a small pair of needle nose pliars.

 

I see u didnt season your smoker first....it's illrevelant now cause after you smoked your ribs it should be seasoned now.

 

But for you newbies like me season your smoker first before you put your first meat in.  Do a google search there are several methods of doing this.

 

Mel

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tjshelton View Post

Here are some more Qviews...

 

 

The nicely rubbed spare ribs go into the smoker.

 

CIMG7148.JPG

 

I forgot to take intermediate pictures - But followed the 3-2-1 method. 

Here's the final result. 

BTW - the info on the Smoked Potato Salad can be found here --> http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/forum/thread/107969/smoked-potato-salad-w-qview

 

CIMG7157.JPG

 

This was my first attempt - so here are some lesson's learned...

 

1)  You don't need to open your smoker door every 5 minutes...

2)  An overly spicy (or peppery) rub can spoil the meat.

3)  Don't use your wife's good kitchen towels to set your meat on.

4)  3-2-1 doesn't necessarily mean 3-2-1.

 

For item 1 - I figured this out pretty quickly...  but still snuck more peeks than I should have

For item 2 - There was too much black pepper and cayenne in the mix.  We snuck a small piece of meat and had to drink a lot of water.  My wife called me a bad name, then took some heartburn medicine.  When I took the ribs out to wrap them for step 2 of the 3-2-1 method, I scraped the bark off.  Fortunately, this saved the meal as most of the burn was in the bark.

For item 3 - I guess I'm taking my wife to William-Sonoma tomorrow to get her some more nice towels...

For Item 4 - I kept my eye on the meat and the meat had pulled away from the bone at 2 an 1/2 hours - so that's when I went to the next part (and ruined my wife's towel, if you're still hanging onto that).  The last hour (the "1") should have been 30 minutes.  The meat was a little dry, but still some of the best, fall-off-the-bone tender, spare ribs that I and my wife have ever eaten. 

 

I know I've learned from my lessons, and I hope I can help someone else not make the same mistakes - especially about the towel...

 

Happy Smoking...



 

post #26 of 29

Thanks Gary.  I have used the hot water rinse on the membrane side and it works great.  I had forgotten who to credit for the tip.  Thanks to your post I can now thank Smoking Ohio Butcher!

 

Good luck and good smoking.

post #27 of 29

i just made my first rub and used 1 Tablespoon of cayenne 60k. and I though that i might tone it down. i saw your 5 cups and I said to my holy S**^%. then I saw your correction and was glad to see you are human! lol 2 tbs is a lot to me probably, not to some.

 

you can mix some different peppers for taste vs heat. here are there heat ratings. http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/Articles/Cooking-Tips--Techniques-642/chile-heat-scale.aspx

 

for me personal preference I lke the tingle of some heat in the after taste but not domination. I prefer Chipotle with red meat for some reason over all other. so I am thinking my next try I will go with

1 tsp 60k cayenne

1 tsp ancho 

1 tsp chipotle

 

I should get some flavor of peppers and nice tingle that should not last as long as my last rub.

 

just sharing one man adventure in rub mixes. I'm a wimp when it come to heat. I won't go any hotter than "hot" at hooters if that help judge my opinion.

 

good luck and look forward to some rub from you.

 

 

post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by raymo76 View Post

Paul Kirk has two good books, one is a smaller book geared directly for teaching you how to make your own rubs, it has recipes. He also has his Barbecue Championship cook book with lots of good recipes and I'm sure that will help you in making your own rubs. Those are the only two BBQ books I have at the moment. I bought Steven Raichlin's BBQ Bible, but I gave it to my brother. Everything to me seemed to be towards grilling or just things that didn't seem appealing to me.

 

Here's a link to P. Kirk's books

 

http://www.baron-of-bbq.com/Books.htm


thanks for that link. more fun <insert evil scientist laugh here>

 

post #29 of 29

Great thread for a newbie. I see great success in your future. You put a lot of time and effort in your process, it won't be long til you figure out what works and what doesn't. I have been smoking for years and am finely refining my technique, with help of this forum. I bought Jeff's recipe, it's a great start and you can adjust your taste accordingly. 

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