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Smoked bread

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Has anyone ever smoked the flour before making bread?  I'm wondering how smoked flour, probably cold smoked, would be in a recipe...

post #2 of 19

Look for a post from Squirrel where she smoked the flour and made bread

post #3 of 19

Yup! Squirrel did some a while ago, Shoot her a PM.

post #4 of 19

It's awesome, and yes you need to cold smoke it. I use it for bread and pasta. Don't use the whole amount smoked, only start with maybe 1/4 of the flour smoked and the rest unsmoked. The first time I made it I used all smoked and didn't care for it. Way too smokey and almost bitter. I just wanted enough to let you know it was there but not take away from the bread flavor. I really like it with making pasta too, and biscuits, and gravy too. I have also cold smoked corn starch that I use to thicken sauces. Good stuff. Todd created a monster when he sent me that darn AMS.

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 

Sounds good! I'm gonna have to try this!  Also good for using smoked flour for fried chicken I'm guessing? 

 

I'm doing a winter bacon project and haven't used the heat inside my smoker since I got that little rack!  Love it!

post #6 of 19

I have smoked pizza, and bread wrapped around fatties. It was good that way!

post #7 of 19

icon_cool.gif

Now that squirrel girl is off the hook. If it's a strange method or a strange ingredient  she has done it. That's yet another reason why we love here sooo much. You know like the Adam's Family. If it's cookie or it's different, alittle strange or spooky it's the squirrel girls that will try it. OK so I'm corny

post #8 of 19

"OK so I'm corny"  hmm. smoked cornmeal for cornbread or polenta or..... ??

post #9 of 19

Squirrel, how long did you smoke the flour?

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluefrog View Post

Squirrel, how long did you smoke the flour?


for about 4 hours. I tried doing it 6-7 and I thought that was a bit much.  I forgot to mention how yummy grits are smoked.

 

Hey Mark - you hit the nail on the head buddy. I recently smoked butter. Melted butter. Then I used it on corn on the cob. Yum. I also did a shot of it. All in the name of experimentation. I'm thinking of future generations ya know.

 

I'm still having to go to the library, long story, but hopefully will have a new computer by Wednesday. I'm Jonesin' bad my friends.

 

 


 

post #11 of 19

I've got gritz, pistachios, and two cheeses (sharp chedder & monterey jack) cold smoking right now in the bradley with an amaz-n-smoker.  Just stirred the gritz and nuts and of course had to taste a pistachio.  Even thou the smoke is not complete I can tell how good they will be when finished.  Yum-o.

post #12 of 19

mmm... reminds me of bread on a stick from my youth spent in the BS of A!

Smoke makes everything taste better.

 

Anybody try smoking the dough? getting the smoker down to about 165-170 with a big pan of boiling water in the bottom, and light hardwood chunk to smoke it up like a hazy proofer? 

post #13 of 19

I don't know about raising the temp up that high to do dough.

If I was going to try smoking dough, which does sound interesting, I would do it during the rising process which should be done maybe slightly above room temp.

At  120 degrees the yeast will start to die.

 

80-90 degrees would be perfect

 

If I was going to do dough, I would also do very low smoke for a short stretch of time because I would think it would absorb way more really fast.

You can not 1/4 dough like squirel did with the flower, it is really an all or nothing thing.

 

My buddy is a baker and we do pizzas a lot. He has gotten me in to doing pizzas and he is following me in to the smoking world.

We have done smoked meets on Pizza maybe this will be the next step.

I know I have planned on getting a grill to do pizzas in, maybe this will be another alternative or addition.

 

BTW, I have had pizza where the dough was made with beer mash and it is ultra yummy.

 

 

post #14 of 19

Smoked pistachios.Sounds intriguing. Gonna have to try that.

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjlued View Post

I don't know about raising the temp up that high to do dough.

If I was going to try smoking dough, which does sound interesting, I would do it during the rising process which should be done maybe slightly above room temp.

At  120 degrees the yeast will start to die.

 

80-90 degrees would be perfect

 

If I was going to do dough, I would also do very low smoke for a short stretch of time because I would think it would absorb way more really fast.

You can not 1/4 dough like squirel did with the flower, it is really an all or nothing thing.

 

My buddy is a baker and we do pizzas a lot. He has gotten me in to doing pizzas and he is following me in to the smoking world.

We have done smoked meets on Pizza maybe this will be the next step.

I know I have planned on getting a grill to do pizzas in, maybe this will be another alternative or addition.

 

BTW, I have had pizza where the dough was made with beer mash and it is ultra yummy.

 

 



That's a good point, I'd forgotten that 165 is fatal to yeast and bacteria. Perhaps "cold" smoking would work? Then again there'd be the risk of over-smoking the dough... buttered ashtray just doesn't sound that good. I'd like to try baking it in a smoker, I've grilled breads, but smoker-roased bread may be another stretch into that frontier.

 

Beer mash bread? That sounds so good, like how bread was mean to be made!

post #16 of 19

Lots of people cook bread or pizza on a grill.

However, the idea of smoking in my mind generally means cooking it slow at low temps.

Many breads cook better fast at high temps IMO.

When my buddy and I do Pizzas, we are talking about 500 degrees on  a stone and they are done in a matter of minutes.

I actually plan on the next grill I buy being capable of doing at least 2 pizzas at a time.

 

However, if you want that smoked flavor, I would say to either stick with the flower or if you do the dough try it during the rising process.

I am no expert in smoking or baking and and although my buddy is a hell of a baker, he is just learning smoking but he agrees.

(BTW, he has over 20 years working in kitchens)

 

I think our next pizza we might try smoking the dough.

If so, I will let you all know.

 

 

 

 

post #17 of 19

I definitely agree that breads need high heat in order to shine, I think the smoked flour routine is pobably the safest direction to go.

post #18 of 19

I just got don't making some pizzas and smoked one of the dough balls.

Really nice touch.

 

 

post #19 of 19



sounds good!

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjlued View Post

I just got don't making some pizzas and smoked one of the dough balls.

Really nice touch.

 

 



So here's an idea:

Proof the dough ball in the smoker, or cabinet that's being warmed by a hot plate on low, with a pan of boiling water on top, just like a professional proofer. Add an AMNS with enough dust for maybe an hour's smoke, so as to not oversmoke. Oil on the surface of the dough will help it not dry out, and will help the smoke flavor migrate beyond the crust.

Viola: dirty proofer!

I think cherry wood would be nice

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