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soldering iron and cold smoking - Page 3

post #41 of 54
Quote:

 

Believe me when I say, "I am trying to help answer your questions, it just doesn't sound like it".. 

 

Let me know if I can be of more help.....  Dave
 

 



Your input is very helpful. All info that I get I use to reduce my trial and error is awesome. I have no problem learning from other's successes and mistakes. Thank you!

 

post #42 of 54
I did the soldering iron method I used the first can I made and I made it wrong it only smoked for like 45 mins. I let the cheese rest and it has a hint of smoke flavor. I am going to redo it and try again. In the can does it have to be chips or can it be pellets also?


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post #43 of 54
Thread Starter 


monoxide, evening... I have used chips like lil chief but I'm sure dust and pellets will work also.... I'm going out on a limb here guessing the 45 min smoke was due to too much air supply... I can't be sure... just a guess... close up the can with foil and have a small hole for the iron and a small hole hear the top for smoke and see what happens... You can do the test without meat if you want.... just put it in the smoker, grill or cardboard box that you would normally use to check the performance.... you can even fine tune the system doing that....

Let us know of your success or not so success so others can learn....  Pics would be good too...

Always glad to help out... just paying it forward so to speak....  Dave
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monoxide View Post

I did the soldering iron method I used the first can I made and I made it wrong it only smoked for like 45 mins. I let the cheese rest and it has a hint of smoke flavor. I am going to redo it and try again. In the can does it have to be chips or can it be pellets also?


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post #44 of 54

pellets work well but burn faster than chips in my experience.

post #45 of 54

Dang wish I had seen this earlier. I have been using a couple lit briquettes or a hand full of lit lump, and chips too cold smoke. (very time consuming) The can would be much easier. However I ordered the AMNSP on Sunday so that will be even easier. biggrin.gif

post #46 of 54
Thread Starter 

Sprky, evening.... Todd does make life easier doesn't he..... the man is a genius......  Dave

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sprky View Post

Dang wish I had seen this earlier. I have been using a couple lit briquettes or a hand full of lit lump, and chips too cold smoke. (very time consuming) The can would be much easier. However I ordered the AMNSP on Sunday so that will be even easier. biggrin.gif



 

post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by mballi3011 View Post

icon_cool.gif

Now that method of cold smoking is kinda out of style to say. Now days there are many products on sale around here and other places too. Try the a-maze-n smoking product on TJohnson signature and you will see wome of the newest. 


Cold smoking is out of style? Where you been hiding? Cold smoking is still going strong and hard. We cold smoke bacon, cheese and lot of sausages and other things. Also easier then ever. Personally I use My Bradley for cold smoking. Others use the wood tray am-zin smoker or the smoke daddy and lots of others. When needed cold smoke is the only way to do it.

 

 

post #48 of 54

I love cold smoking.  I got the AMNPS a couple of weeks ago and have used it a bunch already.  I also just read in a Charcuterie book that pastrami was traditionally cold smoked and then hot smoked.  Cold smoking is still going strong.  I ended up purchasing the AMNPS because there are no wires, pumps or anything else to break down.  I believe that in the long run it is going to be cheapest.  Indestructible.

 

I also have a great deal of respect for Todd showing a link on the soldering iron cold smoker and not pushing his product.  That shows his integrity in my book.  

post #49 of 54
I want to order a amnps when I have the extra money for it.


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post #50 of 54

Now that method of snappy smoking is kinda out of call to say. Now days there are numerous products on merchandising around here and other places too. Try the a-maze-n breathing quantity on TJohnson line and you give see wome of the newest.I instrument scrap that aim and use a least bond.

This solder-iron idea opens up a full new man to vaporisation hard foods.
 

post #51 of 54

^ 31.gif

post #52 of 54

I've known for a short while about cold smoking with soldering irons.

 

I recently went to a hardware store to choose a soldering iron for cold smoking.  For goodness sake?!?  There were so many to choose from.  Different sizes, wattages, etc.  I expected the heating element part of the soldering iron to be quite long, but it's only a few centrimetres long, at the most.  Is this going to be big enough to smoke a can full of sawdust/chips?  Also, one of the staff at the hardware store said some of the soldering irons have their tips "already tipped" (prepared or primed in some way), where as some of them don't.  This has got to make some difference, in terms of food safety.  I also read online that you should only ever use a brand new, unused soldering iron that has not been used for actual soldering.

 

Before I poison myself with some weird chemical smoke, can someone give me some advice with soldering irons please?  Types?  More/Less wattage is best?  Specific brand(s)/model(s) perhaps?  Any sort of metal cans (for the sawdust) that you should not use?  But the main issue is getting (or avoiding) an "already tipped" soldering iron, as well as wattage.

 

If you post a reply in the Forums, that would be great....but please....PM me as well.  Thanks all.

post #53 of 54
Thread Starter 

Gasbag, morning...   As far as the wattage goes, all soldering iron get to about 900 deg F in order to melt the solder..  The wattage is important when trying to heat a larger mass... A 30-40 watt iron if fine......  Do not get a "pre-tinned" tip...  plain tip is healthier...   If the sawdust/chips/pellets are dry, the iron will ignite them and they should smolder on their own... Everything being right, the iron can be turned off after the first 20 min or so and the smoke should continue....  Dry wood is important... I dry mine in pie tins in the smoker while preheating...  usually for an hour or more and then store them in air tight tins for later use.... controlling the air supply to a tin of chips can be important to keep them from bursting into flame..... unplugging the iron will (should) put out the fire...  reduced air intake and exhaust will control a good smoke....   Dave 

post #54 of 54

I bought my 40 watt soldering iron from Radioshack, not sure if the tip was pre tinned or not, doesn't look like it,,,,,,anyway I unscrewed the tip and used it in the can without the tip. I also plugged it in on the work bench for quite awhile to burn anything off of it before I used it.

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