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need info on beef bacon.

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Wife has been told not to eat pork because of blood pressure problems.
Is there any way to make Beef bacon that is practical? Maybe like U would
Canadian Bacon ? Got the equipment just lack the info.. Thanx, HemiPDT_Armataz_01_04.gif
post #2 of 7
different tallow.... I would look to make turkey bacon or duck bacon. Should avoid what she is trying to avoid and still taste decent when it is cured up.

Of course there is always beef breakfast sausage!
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Of course there is always beef breakfast sausage!
USMC Sgt, Semi-retired

Beef breakfast sausage? point me at a recipe please.. PDT_Armataz_01_01.gif
post #4 of 7
I would further clarify with your doctor why he or she specifies 'not to eat pork' - is it because of the meat itself or what it is made into (like sausage and bacon, both salt-intense products which is hell on blood pressure). You can make both sausage and bacon from beef as well as lamb, goat, deer, turkey, etc. but in it's processing you have to use about the same ingredients you do with pork - salt, sugar, cure, etc. - i suspect that is the real problem, not the pork itself, unless it's lean vs. fat battle, then you can make your own with lean pork.
post #5 of 7
I have heard and seen someone here make bacon out of the point of the brisket. I do have it on my short list in the bacon makin wants.
post #6 of 7
I too would ask Doctor why, Pork of its self is not bad on blood pressure as far as I know.
post #7 of 7
I sincerely apologize, I was remiss and did not address your original question; how to make beef bacon. I'm not upholding my OTBS duty and obligation to you. Please allow me to answer now.
To be from the same cut as traditional belly bacon in a pig, you would have to use the plate, the section below the rib:

However, this may be hard to find unless you know a farmer butchering his own. It's kissing cousin, the brisket, would be far more obtainable retail, and be leaner. Or, you could use chuck roasts too, just cut them lengthwise into narrower pieces then slice on the face.
Whatever cut you choose, you then pickle it; either dry or wet cure, whatever is your choice. I wet-cure everything with a brine made up of 1 cup sugar, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup salt and 1 tbsp. DQ Cure #1 in 1 gallon of water. If you're doing a whole brisket, I would inject the thicker point-end of the brisket to get the brine inside so it's curing inside-out as well as outside-in; I would probably brine it about 10 days to 2 weeks (of course under refrigeration). Make sure it is totally immersed in the brine, hold it down with ziploc bags of water.
Then, just take it out of the brine, rinse it off a bit and let dry for an hour or so at room temp, then smoke and cook to 150°; well done but not low and slow to try and tenderize it; you need it firm so you can slice it; cook at 250° to 275° or so. Let cool and slice - voila, beef bacon!
You'd use the same process for pork belly bacon, canadian bacon, pork butt bacon (buckboard), smoked chicken or turkey, dried beef (I add an extra cup of salt for the dried beef) etc. etc.
Here's me injecting a turkey breast so it pickles from the inside-out as well as the outside-in:

The finished bird:

and some finished buckboard bacon:

pumping an eye round for dried beef:

and the finished product:

A chicken pickling:

and cooked:

So you can see I've pickled and smoked beef, pork, turkey and chicken using the same brine and the same pickling method. If I can do it, you sure can, and I'm sure much better, too! Give it a try!
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