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Capacola Part One W/QVIEW

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Here is the butt I bought a few days ago.

Here it is boned and tied. Pain in the butt, pun intended. Here things start to go wrong, I ran out of twine, I will have the butcher do it next time, I didn't think of it at the time. Then my brine pump was broke so I wasn't able to pump it.icon_evil.gif

Here it is in my pressure cooker as I didn't have a pail around.

Following the bag instructions I made 10 cups of brine and submerged for a rest. Still not sure how long because the bag says 24 hours, Rytecs book says 3 days.

Oh well just another experiment with the unknown, Wont be the first or last time, that's what this is all about.

Thanks for watching and any all comments are welcome. Wish me luck!!icon_smile.gif
post #2 of 21
good luck ron ..can't wait to see the q-view...looks like its going to be good...
post #3 of 21
Tell me more about this Capacola thing you are going for. I recognize the cust of meat as an Italian meat. What process are you putting the meat through?
post #4 of 21
The first step is right on target. Lookin forward to the end result. Which of course I will have to be very patient. Glad your your going out on a limb and trying new adventures.
post #5 of 21
OMG!! I can't wait to see your que-vue!! I love capacola........oh tell me next is panchetta...oh la la.....
Awesome Ron!!
post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 
Well I thought I could add something new here for the mebers here. I don't think there is much risk, it will still be edable, lol I hope.

Thanks BBQGODESS, I am not sure of that procces until I reasearch it,but I will.
post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
I didn't mean to ignore you, sorry.

Just keep watching and reading, I will cover every step along the way.
post #8 of 21
More of what he said.
post #9 of 21
Ron, given the fact you did not pump it with curing solution, in order to get a complete cure it may be significantly longer than 3 days. Otherwise it's gonna be a seasoned pork roast.
post #10 of 21
cool Idea bud can't wait for the q-view
post #11 of 21
I agree. I'm thinking more like 3 weeks. 1 in. per 7 days and it should be penetrating from all side being in a brine. I'm very interested in how this turns out. Thanx Ron!
post #12 of 21

pump it up

Ron i would get some cure inside ...inject with big needle...it will take longer to cure and that size might not get the inside cured..MHO..go for it im waiting like others here,,,,thanks
post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
I hear ya Ritch.

You are welcome.

You are welcome. If I can find something to pump it I will.

Ok, I am at a loss now. I called Mortons and got no help at all. She asked what the original recipe said and I told her Prague Powder Number 1. She said we have no way of converting that to our product. I asked her what the directions on the package meant for brining 24 hours. She says it is for small cuts of meat. So here I am soaking.icon_evil.gif

I just went to Morton's site and decided to maybe follow this since I don't have a pump.

Canadian Bacon
View Printer-Friendly Version
Add to Recipe Box
More recipes with Morton® Tender Quick® Product
More recipes with Morton® Sugar Cure® Product (Plain and Smoke Flavored)

Prep Time: 20 minutes; refrigerate 3-5 days
Servings: 1 pork loin, cut into 1/8 inch thick slices
1 boneless pork loin
1 tablespoon Morton® Tender Quick® mix or Morton® Sugar Cure® (Plain) mix per pound of loin
1 teaspoon sugar per pound of loinDirections
Trim fat from pork loin. Mix Morton® Tender Quick® mix or Morton® Sugar Cure®
(Plain) mix and sugar. Rub mixture into the loin. Place loin in "food grade" plastic bag;
tie open end. Refrigerate and allow to cure for 3-5 days. Remove from cure.
Soak loin in cool water for 30 minutes; pat dry. Refrigerate uncovered to dry
slightly before cooking.
Cut into 1/8 inch thick slices. Preheat skillet; brush with oil. Fry over low
heat, turning to brown evenly, about 8 - 10 minutes.

I will drain and start this tonight as I don't know what else to do. Any ideas let me know. I haven't given up yet.

Wish me luck!!
Thanks for watching.
post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 
I may have saved the day. Quick thinking I went to a horse supply store and bought a syringe they use for injecting horses.

When I get home I'll post a pic of it.

post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 

Saved I hope

I stopped at a horse supply store and got this. The needle is about 2 1/2 inches long and will work.

I pumped about 6 ounces in. It seemed like the meat was a little soft and mostly rejected the brine and it ran out. So I am thinking that it absorbed quite a bit of brine on it's own.

Before pumping I sliced a thin piece off and fried it up. SALTY, yikes and I did rinse it off.

After that I decided to probably remove tomorrow from the brine and soak, maybe even in the morning as I would rather have less salt. I will season it tommorow and smoke it.

Let me know of any ideas you might have.

As always, thanks for watching, I'll post the progress as I go.

post #16 of 21
I found a little information on Capicola. I am not familiar with it. My wife is probably familiar with it. It is extremely hard to find good italian meats in this part of the country. It doesn't sound like you are doing a true capicola but it should be good.

I know (Pro-Shuut) as my wife pronounces it is not cooked at all but is air dried. It sounds like Cappacoli is smoked. The article I found doesn't give any specifics on how long or what kind of wood is used usually. I also read elsewhere they like to use red chili flakes. Makes sense, Italians love red chili flakes.

In its production, Capicola is first lightly seasoned, often with red and sometimes white wine, garlic, and a variety of herbs and spices which differ depending on region. The meat is then salted (and was traditionally massaged) and stuffed into a natural casing and hung for up to six months to cure. Differences in flavor can also depend on what type of wood is used for smoking as well as what breed of pig is selected. It is essentially the pork counterpart of the air dried, cured beef bresaola. There is also a less common version which is cooked, called coppa cotta (cup cooked).

Capicola is esteemed for its delicate flavor and tender, fatty texture, and is often more expensive than most other salumi. In many countries it is often sold as a gourmet food item. It is usually sliced thin for use in Antipasto or sandwiches such as Muffulettas, Italian subs, and Panini, as well as some traditional Italian Pizza.
post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 
This a confusing issue I know, but I am willing to experiment, if tastes good, I don't care.

Thanks for your interest in this thread, I'll keep you updated.
post #18 of 21
Ron, looks great so far. You have more patience than I do, LOL PDT_Armataz_01_37.gif
post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 
THANK YOU, it's called persistance and thinking on your feet. I'll find a way if I have to soak it forever, Lol

Thanks for your interest in this.
post #20 of 21
You could use it as a toy ( rubber duck ) in the bathtub with ya for the rest of the week. Just kiddin ron sounds good.
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