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post #21 of 30
Jimmy, sounds like good info. Remember though that all people are different and there are probably a number that have a sensitivity to MSG. Just because something is natural and occurs in some foods does not mean that some people might not have a problem with it to some extent or another. Especially considering when food manufacturers and processes could elevate in some food above and beyond what people might get by eating more organic or natural foods.

I have known a couple of people that were sensitive to MSG but did not find out about it until after I had fed them some veggies that had a seasoning salt that had it in it. They did not know ahead of time what I had used when we had dinner and I did not know they were sensitive to it. An hour or so later they both got pretty bad headaches and asked if any thing we ate had MSG in it.

I think overall for most people though it is not a real problem.
post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundown Farms View Post
 

Fake Food Science Exposed!!!  I have wanted to try Accent for a long time but decided I ingest enough risky stuff already. Are there any rules of thumb on using it in lieu of salt or other ingredients in recipes that do not call for it? 

 

A little goes along way. I add 1tsp to a gallon of Soup. A pinch in most dishes...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BBQBrett View Post

Jimmy, sounds like good info. Remember though that all people are different and there are probably a number that have a sensitivity to MSG. Just because something is natural and occurs in some foods does not mean that some people might not have a problem with it to some extent or another. Especially considering when food manufacturers and processes could elevate in some food above and beyond what people might get by eating more organic or natural foods.

I have known a couple of people that were sensitive to MSG but did not find out about it until after I had fed them some veggies that had a seasoning salt that had it in it. They did not know ahead of time what I had used when we had dinner and I did not know they were sensitive to it. An hour or so later they both got pretty bad headaches and asked if any thing we ate had MSG in it.

I think overall for most people though it is not a real problem.

 

Brett, I stated that there are people who are sensitive to the refined version...BUT...There are hundreds of internet articles that claim every Glutamate containing food from Parm Reggiano, Soy Sauce, Sauerkraut and Grandma's Spaghetti Sauce to Sauteed Mushrooms are all MSG and dangerous! ALL building on the paranoia and bad press.

 

I don't doubt your friends are sensitive just like I don't doubt friends of mine that are Celiacs, my point is, an entire generation born after the 60's have eaten MSG in hundreds of convenience foods from Cambell's Soups, to Hot dogs, Bologna and RAMEN and have No Clue and no problem, but swear they are allergic to MSG. IMO it is silly to ignore a useful tool in your culinary arsenal based on hysteria. Your last line is spot on...JJThumbs Up

post #23 of 30

Thank you JJ. Very informative. Just what I had already come to believe, but this acknowledgement is perfect.

 

As for other flavor enhancers- I've been experimenting lately with applications and use of Bragg Liquid Amino. It still has 320mg per tsp though. I have always been a fan of Worchester, and now Hendersons Relish. Soy has its place as well as fish and oyster sauce.

post #24 of 30

My 2 cents

 

I have been experimenting with MSG on and off with sausage seasonings for some time and IMO it can be difficult to figure out the exact amount needed in a recipe to enhance the flavor. I have added too little and couldn't tell the difference and added too much and could taste the MSG too much and had to punt it. There is a fine line when mixing MSG with other ingredients and the way it blends with other ingredients. If you are going to use it there may be some trial and error.  When I try a product that is superior in flavor it usually has MSG in it along with other additives or preservatives so I'm always leaning towards trying to use them in a recipe that will be in the marketplace. At the moment for personal use I don't use it in any sausage seasonings except for a breakfast sausage. I use co-workers as guinea pigs who volunteer as taste testers and they tend to like the products with MSG in them although they don't know its in there..... 

 

I have a buddy who swears he and his son are allergic to MSG and get severe headaches even if they touch it. I haven't told them the Stevens breakfast sausage they eat all the time at the country store's breakfast counter has MSG in it and they eat it up real good.....lol

 

 

Joe

post #25 of 30

   FWIW........             

These magical foods are loaded with natural MSG

gus-lubin.jpg
  • Feb. 3, 2017, 11:30 AM
  • 7,650
 
parmesan cheese
 
Brent Hofacker / Shutterstock
 

 

Monosodium glutamate is a powerful flavor enhancer that, despite what you may have heard, is widely accepted in the scientific community as a safe additive. In fact, MSG or other "free glutamates" occur naturally in many of the most flavorful foods, some of which have been used to enhance flavor in cooking for millennia.

What makes MSG and other free glutamates so potent, researchers believe, is that they trigger special glutamate receptors in your mouth, unlocking the savory taste known as umami.

How do you get free glutamates in your food naturally? Here are some of the foods with the most, according to a review of studies by the Australia/New Zealand food board and a Japanese NGO devoted to umami:

Kelp: 230–3380 mg /100g

Seaweed: 550–1350 mg

Marmite 1960 mg

Vegemite: 1431 mg

Fish sauce: 727–1383 mg

Soy sauce: 400–1700 mg

Parmesan cheese: 1200–1680 mg

Roquefort cheese: 1280 mg

Dried shiitake mushrooms: 1060 mg

Oyster sauce: 900 mg

Miso: 200–700 mg

Green tea: 220–670 mg

Anchovies: 630 mg

Salted squid: 620 mg

Cured ham: 340 mg

Emmental cheese: 310 mg

Sardines: 10–280 mg

Grape juice: 258 mg

Kimchi: 240 mg

Cheddar cheese: 180 mg

Tomatoes: 140–250 mg

Clams: 210 mg

Peas: 200 mg

Potatoes: 30–180 mg

Scallops: 140–159 mg

Squid: 20–146 mg

Shimeji mushrooms: 140 mg

Oysters: 40–150 mg

Corn: 70–130 mg

"If you want to make something taste good, put Parmesan on anything," food scientist Steve Witherly tells Business Insider. "The Italians have known this for about 2,000 years."

So it's logical that a bit of kelp, seaweed, soy sauce, or any other of these ingredients, when added the right way, could punch up the flavor of an existing recipe as well. Yes, a lot of this stuff comes from East Asia (including artificial MSG, invented in Japan).

"Asians are way ahead on the savory side," Witherly says.

If you want a shortcut to umami heaven, you can, of course, use artificial MSG. Witherly swears by it in his home-cooking, particularly what he calls the "ideal mixture" of 9 parts salt to 1 part MSG (plus a bit of disodium inosinate and disodium guanylate). You can buy that potent combination in premixed forms at most Korean and Japanese grocery stores.

post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef JimmyJ View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundown Farms View Post

 
Fake Food Science Exposed!!!  I have wanted to try Accent for a long time but decided I ingest enough risky stuff already. Are there any rules of thumb on using it in lieu of salt or other ingredients in recipes that do not call for it? 

A little goes along way. I add 1tsp to a gallon of Soup. A pinch in most dishes...
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBQBrett View Post

Jimmy, sounds like good info. Remember though that all people are different and there are probably a number that have a sensitivity to MSG. Just because something is natural and occurs in some foods does not mean that some people might not have a problem with it to some extent or another. Especially considering when food manufacturers and processes could elevate in some food above and beyond what people might get by eating more organic or natural foods.


I have known a couple of people that were sensitive to MSG but did not find out about it until after I had fed them some veggies that had a seasoning salt that had it in it. They did not know ahead of time what I had used when we had dinner and I did not know they were sensitive to it. An hour or so later they both got pretty bad headaches and asked if any thing we ate had MSG in it.

I think overall for most people though it is not a real problem.

Brett, I stated that there are people who are sensitive to the refined version...BUT...There are hundreds of internet articles that claim every Glutamate containing food from Parm Reggiano, Soy Sauce, Sauerkraut and Grandma's Spaghetti Sauce to Sauteed Mushrooms are all MSG and dangerous! ALL building on the paranoia and bad press.

I don't doubt your friends are sensitive just like I don't doubt friends of mine that are Celiacs, my point is, an entire generation born after the 60's have eaten MSG in hundreds of convenience foods from Cambell's Soups, to Hot dogs, Bologna and RAMEN and have No Clue and no problem, but swear they are allergic to MSG. IMO it is silly to ignore a useful tool in your culinary arsenal based on hysteria. Your last line is spot on...JJThumbs Up

Regardless you have provided some great info. And I am glad I do not have any problems with msg.
post #27 of 30

The injection I use in my brisket has a cup of beef stock in it and while I make my own chicken and vegetable stock I don't get the bones to make beef stock often.  The beef stock has MSG in it so I do use it for flavor in a lateral sort of way.  I've never got any of the ingredients by themselves Accent, MSG or yeast extract.  I wouldn't be too opposed to it if it made my recipes taste better.

post #28 of 30
The information JJ gives above deserves a bump so many more can read it. As always, JJ is spot on.
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveOmak View Post
 

   FWIW........             

These magical foods are loaded with natural MSG

gus-lubin.jpg
  • Feb. 3, 2017, 11:30 AM
  • 7,650
 
parmesan cheese
 
Brent Hofacker / Shutterstock
 

 

Monosodium glutamate is a powerful flavor enhancer that, despite what you may have heard, is widely accepted in the scientific community as a safe additive. In fact, MSG or other "free glutamates" occur naturally in many of the most flavorful foods, some of which have been used to enhance flavor in cooking for millennia.

What makes MSG and other free glutamates so potent, researchers believe, is that they trigger special glutamate receptors in your mouth, unlocking the savory taste known as umami.

How do you get free glutamates in your food naturally? Here are some of the foods with the most, according to a review of studies by the Australia/New Zealand food board and a Japanese NGO devoted to umami:

Kelp: 230–3380 mg /100g

Seaweed: 550–1350 mg

Marmite 1960 mg

Vegemite: 1431 mg

Fish sauce: 727–1383 mg

Soy sauce: 400–1700 mg

Parmesan cheese: 1200–1680 mg

Roquefort cheese: 1280 mg

Dried shiitake mushrooms: 1060 mg

Oyster sauce: 900 mg

Miso: 200–700 mg

Green tea: 220–670 mg

Anchovies: 630 mg

Salted squid: 620 mg

Cured ham: 340 mg

Emmental cheese: 310 mg

Sardines: 10–280 mg

Grape juice: 258 mg

Kimchi: 240 mg

Cheddar cheese: 180 mg

Tomatoes: 140–250 mg

Clams: 210 mg

Peas: 200 mg

Potatoes: 30–180 mg

Scallops: 140–159 mg

Squid: 20–146 mg

Shimeji mushrooms: 140 mg

Oysters: 40–150 mg

Corn: 70–130 mg

"If you want to make something taste good, put Parmesan on anything," food scientist Steve Witherly tells Business Insider. "The Italians have known this for about 2,000 years."

So it's logical that a bit of kelp, seaweed, soy sauce, or any other of these ingredients, when added the right way, could punch up the flavor of an existing recipe as well. Yes, a lot of this stuff comes from East Asia (including artificial MSG, invented in Japan).

"Asians are way ahead on the savory side," Witherly says.

If you want a shortcut to umami heaven, you can, of course, use artificial MSG. Witherly swears by it in his home-cooking, particularly what he calls the "ideal mixture" of 9 parts salt to 1 part MSG (plus a bit of disodium inosinate and disodium guanylate). You can buy that potent combination in premixed forms at most Korean and Japanese grocery stores.

 

Vegemite: (veg-e mite) Noun. A rare form of explosive produce containing an abnormal amount of Trinitrotoluene. Although rare in nature, synthetic vegemite can be recognized by any common fruit or vegetable such as watermelon and eggplant that has a reddish core and a fuse-like stem. Vegemite is recognized as an Eco-friendly stump remover.

Other forms of vegemite may be produced by marinating whole vegetables in a solution of fuel oil and ammonium nitrate (cure #4). The latter is not recommended..

 

I don't know if I'm going to get in trouble for this but I just couldn't pass it up...

post #30 of 30
Vegemite
Sorta like sex on toast yahoo.gif
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