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More duck prosciutto

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Seems that it's an "industry standard" now...called prosciutto despite being made from the breast.

Had some ducks for confit a few weeks ago. Time to deal with the breasts.

No excuse for the bad butchering job.

Unlike my previous batches (where I used the salt box method) this will be an equilibrium cure. I have a different method in mind for drying.



See you in 10 days.

P.s. I will smoke them
post #2 of 29
Info. We need info.
post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 
Info on what? Dry Cure? Is the typical 0.25% cure and 2.5% salt
post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 
Love duck prosciutto but never liked the asymmetric appearance of the slice. So this time I tied them up in pairs pancetta style .



Will dry them out until tomorrow, then blow some smoke on them.
post #5 of 29

Great idea doing a double to even things up...  Should help the aging also....

post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
That's what I had in mind too.

These are store ducks. Can't wait to get farm ducks again - 1 lb breasts (halves).
post #7 of 29

Ohhhhh yeah

 

Going to be good.

 

Waiting

 

:drool:

post #8 of 29
Thread Starter 


Nice tan... after about 30h of smoke.
post #9 of 29

Nice job on the smoke....   Looks better than perfect to me....  I'm guessing folks will be wondering how 30 hrs. of smoke can look like that... 

Me thinks Atomic has cold smoking down perfect....   Very nice....   2thumbs.gif

post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 
I just rendered nice lard from some leaf fat I had.


Will use a little to cover the exposed meat to slow down drying.


post #11 of 29

Hey Atomic....   Can you tell me the difference between Leaf Fat rendered and Lard purchased in the grocery store...  I could read it on the web, BUT, first hand experience is ALWAYS better....  

 

Dave

post #12 of 29
Great post. The color looks perfect.


Lard? Yes, love lard for cooking.

Now I need to research leaf fat.
post #13 of 29
Thread Starter 
Any lard will do here. Will wipe it off anyway...just needed something that doesn't go rancid.

Leaf fat is valuable as is best for pastries. Yields a bright white almost odourless lard. Creamier than lard rendered from backfat. Irrelevant in this case , but that's what I got. Backfat went for other projects.

When my wife saw the lard she got some ideas too for some Christmas baking. Hope there will be some left because I plan to use it for some confit.

This lard vs store bought? I guess the same difference as the one between store pork and the heritage breed pork.
post #14 of 29

Thanks Atomic....   Dave

post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 
After over two months...At 25% weight loss. That's the skin/fat for you (slow drying).

No rim like you would get with single breasts. Soft, melts in your mouth. Best duck prosicutto I have made.

Edited by atomicsmoke - 1/10/17 at 6:11pm
post #16 of 29
That...looks...awesome! A fermentation chamber is on my list but life keeps pushing it down on the list. You give me incentive.
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by atomicsmoke View Post

After over two months...At 25% weight loss. That's the skin/fat for you (slow drying).

No rim like you would get with single breasts. Soft, melts in your mouth. Best duck prosicutto I have made.

 

You are a mean and rotten person dangling that GORGEOUS Duck Proscuitto  in front of us and living sooooooooo  far away....   I surely do like the way "doubling up" the breasts had an effect on the finished product...  Genius, pure genius...       pts atomic....

post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 
MyownIdaho,

One of the reasons I dried the breasts in pair was the fact that I don't use a curing chamber.
post #19 of 29

Looks delicious Atomic, thanks for sharing.

 

Very nice.

post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
Another view of the smoked/dried breast, twine removed, lard wiped off
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