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Temperature

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I normally set my smoker to 225* when smoking a pork shoulder but I've got a friend that swears by 195*. Any big advantage?
post #2 of 11

None, the shoulder will take a very long time to cook and the finished product will be no better than one cooked at 225° IMHO.

post #3 of 11

If the internal meat temp of the shoulder that you are looking for is 205.

 

Which is where most of us take it, you will never get there if your smoker temp is only 195.

 

I run my offset at 260-280. Food gets done quicker & just as juicy!

 

Al

post #4 of 11

Your friend either does not make Pulled Pork, slices at 160 or so, OR has A LOT of time on his hands. At 195, an 8 pound Butt will get to the point that it will pull but will take in excess of 20 hours. Even at 225° 2 hours per pound to an IT of 205 is not uncommon...JJ

post #5 of 11

i agree with every thing said... there is another possibility. your friend is going my their stock thermometer in their smoker which is reading low... they have absolutely no idea what temp they actually smoke at, but on the inaccurate temp, 195 is getting the job done.

 

195 could be a dangerous temp to be honest... you need to pass 40-140 in 4 hours or have cure in the meat to be safe.

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by uzikaduzi View Post
 

i agree with every thing said... there is another possibility. your friend is going my their stock thermometer in their smoker which is reading low... they have absolutely no idea what temp they actually smoke at, but on the inaccurate temp, 195 is getting the job done.

 

195 could be a dangerous temp to be honest... you need to pass 40-140 in 4 hours or have cure in the meat to be safe.

Good call! Didn't think of that one.:points:...Just an FYI for our readers...40-140 in 4 Only applies to Ground, Boned, Repeatedly Punctured or Injected meat and Poultry. For the average, non-enhanced, Pork Butt, Loin, Brisket, etc, Bacteria is only on the surface and it doesn't matter, short of Days, how long the interior takes to get above a particular temp...JJ 

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef JimmyJ View Post
 

Good call! Didn't think of that one.:points:...Just an FYI for our readers...40-140 in 4 Only applies to Ground, Boned, Repeatedly Punctured or Injected meat and Poultry. For the average, non-enhanced, Pork Butt, Loin, Brisket, etc, Bacteria is only on the surface and it doesn't matter, short of Days, how long the interior takes to get above a particular temp...JJ 


i had never heard that... thank you!

post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by uzikaduzi View Post
 


i had never heard that... thank you!

No problem and you are welcome. There are old techniques in Prime Rib joints of placing whole 20lb Rib Roasts in very accurate Holding Ovens like an Alto.Shaam and slow roasting 24+ hours at 150°F until the IT gets to 130°F. If there was Bacteria throughout the meat, like a Meatloaf, this would be deadly. But since the interior is sterile and 150 is plenty hot enough to kill surface bacteria, all is good to go over this very long cooking process...JJ

post #9 of 11

Question JJ

 

When cooked in a holding oven at 150 does the outside brown like it would at a higher temp?

 

David, Richardson, TX

post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef JimmyJ View Post
 

No problem and you are welcome. There are old techniques in Prime Rib joints of placing whole 20lb Rib Roasts in very accurate Holding Ovens like an Alto.Shaam and slow roasting 24+ hours at 150°F until the IT gets to 130°F. If there was Bacteria throughout the meat, like a Meatloaf, this would be deadly. But since the interior is sterile and 150 is plenty hot enough to kill surface bacteria, all is good to go over this very long cooking process...JJ

 

 

that sounds amazing...

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWDunlap View Post
 

Question JJ

 

When cooked in a holding oven at 150 does the outside brown like it would at a higher temp?

 

David, Richardson, TX

 

i don't actually know for sure, but any browning would be from drying and not the Maillard reaction which is an important part of the flavor of the traditionally seared outside. i don't see why you couldn't do this same thing and crank it up to 450 at the end to get that though for 20 minutes to get that though

post #11 of 11

They don't brown at that low temp so they can either be pre or post seared in a 500° oven...JJ

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